Exercise duration, HRmax and [La]max are presented in fig 2A, B, and C. Visual inspection of the data led to the conclusion that there is no difference in exercise duration and HRmax between the OTS and the NFO patients. For [La]max, a much lower value was found for the OTS patients in combination with a larger reduction from the first to the second test compared with the NFO patients. However, parametric analysis did not indicate significant differences. The main effect of group gave an F ratio of 2.9 for [La]max and an F ratio <1 for exercise duration and HRmax, showing that almost three times as much variance is explained by the group membership (ie, OTS vs NFO) compared with random factors. In addition, sensitivity for OTS detection with [La]max was high (table 2). With a cutoff of 8 mmol l%#x2212;1, four out of the five OTS patients would have been diagnosed correctly from the first exercise test and four out of the four OTS patients from the second exercise test. Sensitivity for NFO diagnosis was lower, however (table 2). From the first exercise test, a correct diagnostic ratio of two out of four was found, for the second test, two out of three.
The Alfredson protocol for Achilles' tendinopathy is actually two separate exercises.  To perform the exercises, you must have a small step or curb on which to stand.  Be sure to check in with your doctor or physical therapist to ensure that it is safe for you to exercise and that you are performing the exercises correctly.   Here is how you perform the Alfredson protocol:
You’re only a week into the program, yet you’ll begin to train different bodyparts on different days with a two-day training split (meaning the entire body is trained over the course of two days, rather than one as in the first week). You’ll train a total of four days this week; the split includes two upper-body days (Monday and Thursday) and two lower-body days (Tuesday and Friday), and each bodypart is trained twice. Wednesday, Saturday and Sunday will be your recovery days.
4) The schedule of workouts, while ideal for those in good shape, is a bit too aggressive for most. Your muscles NEED rest (and proper nutrition) to recover and become stronger. The calendar given provides only 1 day per week to rest. You may find you need more, especially early on while you are using and building new muscles. Modifiy and listen to your body accordingly.
Strength training means using resistance to work your muscles; that can be your bodyweight, dumbbells, kettlebells, sand bags, resistance bands, etc. The goal of this type of workout is to increase muscle mass. Getting stronger helps improve everyday performance (from sports to regular life), prevent injuries, and increase your metabolism. Need a primer on where to start? We’ve got you covered.
I've been strength training for over 15 years now. In college, between martial arts and four months of lifting weights for 6 hours per week I gave myself overuse injuries in my shoulders and knee. I've tried everything, including Mike Mentzer's books, Arnold Schwarzennegger's Bodybuilding Bible, Stuart McRobert's Beyond Brawn, Sisco and Little's Power Factor Training, routines from Men's Health, Flex, and Muscle & Fitness magazines - you name it. Super Slow (and its cousins Slow Burn and Power of 10) are the ONLY form of exercise I can handle for more than two months without having those pains flare up with a vengeance and force me to quit. I've done Super Slow for years without the slightest ache except for normal muscle soreness.
Tabata training is a form of high-intensity interval training. It consists specifically of eight rounds of high-intensity exercise using a 20 seconds on (at full capacity) and 10 seconds off (rest) format. The goal is to push yourself as hard as you can during the 20 second on period. Tabata only requires one exercise, but you can combine different strength and aerobic exercises to make your own Tabata routine. Here’s a simple example of Tabata for one exercise:
All data are presented as means ± standard deviation (SD) unless stated. Assumptions of statistical tests such as normal distribution and sphericity of data were checked as appropriate. Greenhouse-Geisser correction to the degrees of freedom was applied when violations to sphericity were present. For reliability statistics, assumptions of homoscedasticity and heteroscedasticity were checked as appropriate. Reliability analysis was conducted following the guidelines provided by Atkinson and Nevill [19]. Our sample size of eight subjects is comparable to previous studies using high-intensity OLDE [8, 11, 17].
Get your shoulders looking svelte with hand/arm raises. Riggins says here’s how to do them: Raise your hand over head; hand is at a 90-degree angle to the body as if you’re doing shoulder press with no weights. Put your hands up and raise over head; raise up to sky and bring back down. Keep repeating for 30 seconds. We know it sounds too easy, but you’ll feel it start to burn about 20 seconds in!
So what's so special about tendon problems and eccentric exercise? It seems that eccentric exercise seems to be helpful to injured tendons. Why? Researchers still do not know why this type of exercise is special. Still, if you have a tendon injury, like Achilees tendonitis, your physical therapist may have you perform eccentric exercises to help treat your condition.
Back in mid-century America, you did old-style sit-ups, which were once regarded as the gold standard of iron-gut, military discipline. Maybe they still are, so if your idea of "manly" is messing up your lower back, go for it. But few fitness trainers recommend old-style sit-ups, though there are some re-conceptualized versions of them that might work for you.
Fit septuagenarians may even need to be held back: “Strength training is super empowering,” she says. “And people get excited when they see and feel the results. I have older clients doing multiple timed sets of kettlebell swings. One older client biked 2,700 miles in 50 days. It takes a little longer, but they can reach really impressive levels of fitness.”
To qualify for inclusion, studies had to be level 1 or level 2 (randomized controlled trials); had to compare rehabilitation interventions, such as exercise or manual therapy, with other treatments or placebo; had to include validated outcome measures of pain, function, or disability; and had to be limited to individuals with diagnosed impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome was determined by a positive impingement sign per Neer or Hawkins criteria, or both. Articles were excluded if they addressed other shoulder conditions (eg, calcific tendinosis, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, adhesive capsulitis, osteoarthritis), addressed postoperative management, were retrospective studies or case series, or used other outcome measures.

Individual and group time to exhaustion duration are presented Table 2. Time to exhaustion duration ranged from 3.94 to 9.44 min (S1: 6.07 ± 1.71 min, S2: 5.59 ± 0.99 min, S3: 6.23 ± 1.68 min) and did not differ between sessions (P = 0.156). Individual and group CV are presented in Table 2. The ICC was 0.795 (0.493, 0.950). The typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and the smallest worthwhile change was 0.28 min. Bland-Altman plots for raw and log transformed data are presented in Fig 3. LOA was equal to 15.59.


The Pull-up is performed by hanging from a chin-up bar above head height with the palms facing forward (supinated) and pulling the body up so the chin reaches or passes the bar. The pull-up is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. A chin-up (palms facing backwards) places more emphasis on the biceps and a wide grip pullup places more emphasis on the lats. As beginners of this exercise are often unable to lift their own bodyweight, a chin-up machine can be used with counterweights to assist them in the lift.
Stretching helps maintain flexibility. We often overlook that in youth, when our muscles are healthier. But aging leads to a loss of flexibility in the muscles and tendons. Muscles shorten and don't function properly. That increases the risk for muscle cramps and pain, muscle damage, strains, joint pain, and falling, and it also makes it tough to get through daily activities, such as bending down to tie your shoes.
The two 20-minute high-energy kickboxing routines combined with other cardio moves eliminate boredom in this program. When I felt particularly ambitious, I did both together for one calorie-blasting 40-minute workout; I chose one or the other when I only had 20 minutes to spare in the morning. Make sure to do this in a spacious room, because the amount of kicking, punching and movement, as I unfortunately discovered, is not tailored to tiny spaces.
The military press is similar to the shoulder press but is performed while standing with the feet together. (It is named "military" because of the similarity in appearance to the "at attention" position used in most militaries) Unlike the seated shoulder press, the military press involves the majority of the muscles of the core as stabilizers to keep the body rigid and upright, and is thus a more effective compound exercise.
Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.
Tracing the origins of Western MMB training suggests that the regular practice of movement-harmonizing exercises was embedded in ancient Greek culture.1 Herodotis. The history of Herodotus. New York (NY): Appleman and Company; 1885. [Google Scholar] Calisthenics in Greek means strength and beauty, a combination highlighted in Greek mythology and everyday life. This philosophy engendered sporting activities that were practiced to facilitate self-empowerment and prepare for events such as the Olympic Games or military actions.2 The Atlantic [Internet]. Cheever DW. The Gymnasium (1859). 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.theatlantic.com/magazine/archive/1859/05/the-gymnasium/305407/. [Google Scholar] Today, Calisthenics refers to full-body movement exercises benefiting the body and mind by employing functional motions such as bending, stretching, twisting, kicking, jumping, push-ups, sit-ups, and squats.3 Greek Calisthenics Movement [Internet]. History. 2015 Jun 25 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://calisthenics.gr/en/index.html. [Google Scholar]

There are many things a consumer can do to minimize unsatisfactory purchases when it comes to exercise videos. We have put together a buyer’s guide that will give you a lot of information on learning as much as you can about exercise videos and what they are about BEFORE you spend the money. When you are armed with this information you can be more assured that the videos you decide to purchase will actually be ones you use.
Jump up ^ Blondell SJ, Hammersley-Mather R, Veerman JL (May 2014). "Does physical activity prevent cognitive decline and dementia?: A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies". BMC Public Health. 14: 510. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-510. PMC 4064273. PMID 24885250. Longitudinal observational studies show an association between higher levels of physical activity and a reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. A case can be made for a causal interpretation. Future research should use objective measures of physical activity, adjust for the full range of confounders and have adequate follow-up length. Ideally, randomised controlled trials will be conducted. ... On the whole the results do, however, lend support to the notion of a causal relationship between physical activity, cognitive decline and dementia, according to the established criteria for causal inference.

Open AccessThis article is distributed under the terms of the Creative Commons Attribution 4.0 International License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by/4.0/), which permits unrestricted use, distribution, and reproduction in any medium, provided you give appropriate credit to the original author(s) and the source, provide a link to the Creative Commons license, and indicate if changes were made. The Creative Commons Public Domain Dedication waiver (http://creativecommons.org/publicdomain/zero/1.0/) applies to the data made available in this article, unless otherwise stated.

In parallel, Prussian nationalist and exercise instructor Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778–1852) advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Jahn invented the standard equipment of modern gymnastics; the parallel bars, rings, balance beam, horse, and horizontal bar4 Bakewell S. Illustrations from the Wellcome Institute Library: Medical gymnastics and the Cyriax collection. Med Hist. 1997;41:487–95.10.1017/S0025727300063067[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] and in 1811, founded the Physical Culture Movement in Germany.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Ling and Jahn’s Physical Culture gained following and flourished in gymnasiums throughout Europe and later in the United States of America until the end of the 19th century. However, toward the end of the century, the original concept of harmonious interaction between the competitive and holistic exercise systems eroded and deteriorated. This was due to the late 19th century shift in the gymnasium environment toward harsh paramilitary style training.9–11 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890.

Our methodology, classes + 1:1 training incorporate what a lot of fitness methods are missing [regardless of pregnancy]. So while we provide you necessary tools and guide you to a strong + functional core and body, we won’t just teach you to “kegel”  or  “pull your belly button to your spine” because those techniques need to stay in the past. Instead, we create a balance in your pelvic floor and core that will continue to support you for life, preparing you for your birth marathon and motherhood with every pulse, hold, and full range move we guide you through. 

Are you new to the gym and not sure where to start? Looking to add more variety into your workout? Or are you wanting to master a move to perfection? Then look no further. Learn how to perform exercise moves safely and effectively with our exercise database, which includes top tips from our qualified trainers, video demonstrations, and a step by step guide.
... Consequently, it was suggested that when determining LT in trained subjects, at least 8-min stages should be used ( Foxdal et al., 1996;Weltman et al., 1990). However, using such a stage duration would not allow maximal tasks to be assessed, since the duration of the whole procedure could result in an excess of fatigue or motivation ( Buchfuhrer et al., 1983). This was shown to compromise the V Á O 2max and maximum work-rate achievements (Bentley et al., 2007). ...
Our huge database of exercise guides are broken up into specific muscle groups and exercise categories. If you’re looking to work on toning up your butt, just choose this muscle group from the list and you’re all set. If you are interested in getting started using kettlebells, then choose this option from the exercise types list and you will have access to over 100 muscle building, fat burning kettlebell exercises! We have included easy to access dropdown lists to choose from along with a detailed “muscle map” below which shows the area of the body where each muscle group is located. Just click on the body part you want to tighten up and you’re on your way to a firmer physique! From free weight exercises using dumbbells and barbells, all the way to bodyweight movements, our extensive database of exercise guides really has a workout solution for anyone who is interested in living a healthier lifestyle.

The neurobiological effects of physical exercise are numerous and involve a wide range of interrelated effects on brain structure, brain function, and cognition.[33][34][35][36] A large body of research in humans has demonstrated that consistent aerobic exercise (e.g., 30 minutes every day) induces persistent improvements in certain cognitive functions, healthy alterations in gene expression in the brain, and beneficial forms of neuroplasticity and behavioral plasticity; some of these long-term effects include: increased neuron growth, increased neurological activity (e.g., c-Fos and BDNF signaling), improved stress coping, enhanced cognitive control of behavior, improved declarative, spatial, and working memory, and structural and functional improvements in brain structures and pathways associated with cognitive control and memory.[33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42] The effects of exercise on cognition have important implications for improving academic performance in children and college students, improving adult productivity, preserving cognitive function in old age, preventing or treating certain neurological disorders, and improving overall quality of life.[33][43][44]

So, for me, squatting while commuting or planking (one of the 7 Best Ab Exercises for Women!) before bed has become quick and foolproof ways to make sure I get some part of my workout in without having to stress about making time for the gym. Instead, I bring the working out with me even on the go. Everyone has at least 30 spare seconds (trust me, even the days you’re sure you don’t—you do). That’s why I went to the experts and compiled a master list of exercises that work every body part. Best of all? Each one brings results if you do them for 30 seconds every day (some ask for 60 seconds, but that’s so you can work both arms and both legs). Just remember to keep your diet on track, too; just because you squeeze in mini workouts doesn’t mean you can feast on foods like these 20 Shocking Foods With More Fat Than a Big Mac!

The benefits of exercise have been known since antiquity. Dating back to 65 BCE, it was Marcus Cicero, Roman politician and lawyer, who stated: "It is exercise alone that supports the spirits, and keeps the mind in vigor."[143] Exercise was also seen to be valued later in history during the Early Middle Ages as a means of survival by the Germanic peoples of Northern Europe.[144]
If you notice words like high intensity, fat blasting, sweat producing and similar phrases, you can almost guarantee that the video is for intermediates at the very least and probably more suited for advanced users. The reason you want to start off slow is so you don’t get burned out the very first time you struggle through it. This doesn’t mean don’t challenge yourself, it just means start off with something you can have success in finishing and build on that success.
Exercise and physical activity fall into four basic categories—endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. Most people tend to focus on one activity or type of exercise and think they’re doing enough. Each type is different, though. Doing them all will give you more benefits. Mixing it up also helps to reduce boredom and cut your risk of injury.
The barre method uses your own body weight for resistance and focuses on small, deliberate movements that focus on specific groups of muscles, specifically muscles that aren’t used in other workouts. Muscles are worked to the point of fatigue, and then stretched for relief. Proper form, body alignment and posture is stressed, which in turn leads to an overall strengthening of core muscles and the appearance of an aligned, lean body.
Physical exercise is important for maintaining physical fitness and can contribute to maintaining a healthy weight, regulating digestive health, building and maintaining healthy bone density, muscle strength, and joint mobility, promoting physiological well-being, reducing surgical risks, and strengthening the immune system. Some studies indicate that exercise may increase life expectancy and the overall quality of life.[10] People who participate in moderate to high levels of physical exercise have a lower mortality rate compared to individuals who by comparison are not physically active.[11] Moderate levels of exercise have been correlated with preventing aging by reducing inflammatory potential.[12] The majority of the benefits from exercise are achieved with around 3500 metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes per week.[13] For example, climbing stairs 10 minutes, vacuuming 15 minutes, gardening 20 minutes, running 20 minutes, and walking or bicycling for transportation 25 minutes on a daily basis would together achieve about 3000 MET minutes a week.[13] A lack of physical activity causes approximately 6% of the burden of disease from coronary heart disease, 7% of type 2 diabetes, 10% of breast cancer and 10% of colon cancer worldwide.[14] Overall, physical inactivity causes 9% of premature mortality worldwide.[14]
Begin this starter sit-up with your legs straight in front of you. Extend your arms over your legs and lower your head between your arms. Curl backward, bending your knees, and stop halfway down. Raise your arms straight up and pull your abs in tightly. Exhale and lower your arms as you curl back up. Do 6-8 reps at a moderate pace. As you become more advanced, try lowering all the way to the floor.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.1 article “Mechanisms and Mediators of the Skeletal Muscle Repeated Bout Effect” from author Rob Hyldahl. Skeletal muscle adapts to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating several but still poorly understood mechanisms that endow protection from subsequent damage. Known widely as the repeated bout effect, we propose that neural adaptations, alterations to muscle mechanical properties, structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and biochemical signaling work in concert to coordinate the protective adaptation.
Or should I say Chalene JAMS! This is a really fun program. I admit I felt kind of foolish and uncoordinated at first, but now that I know the moves I get in there and sweat up a storm! I like that there are low impact modifications for those of us with back or knee issues that preclude a whole lotta jumping around. I haven't lost any weight doing the program (probably more hormonal and metabolic roadblocks than lack of trying) but I feel better when I do it, so I am not disappointed one bit.
P corresponds to the power expressed in watt (W), T the torque in newton meter (N·m) and the angular velocity in rad/s. Typical recordings of torque, position and EMG signals from the Vastus Lateralis (knee extensor) and Biceps Femoris (knee flexor) could be found in Fig 2. Fig 2 presents all signals previously mentioned for an isotonic resistance of 9 N·m (~ 16.7 W, panel A) and 37 N·m (~ 68.5 W, panel B). The inactivity of the Biceps Femoris during the flexion phase confirms that we were successful in creating a protocol on the dynamometer that isolates the knee extensor muscles during dynamic exercise, as in the exercise model originally proposed by Andersen et al. [10].
Exercising stock options should not be a passive event that happens after a given amount of time. It's rather like playing a hand of cards: if your plays are strategic, you'll probably "know when to hold them and when to fold them." Many alternatives and trade-offs need to be considered. But, as always, rules, requirements, and regulations govern this area, and this is where we begin.
The findings indicated that exercise improves outcomes of pain, strength, ROM impairments, and function in patients with impingement syndrome. In 10 studies, investigators reported improvements in pain with supervised exercise, home exercise, exercise associated with manual therapy, and exercise after subacromial decompression. Of the 6 studies in which researchers compared pre-exercise pain with postexercise pain, 5 demonstrated that exercise produced statistically significant and clinically important reductions in pain. Two studies demonstrated improvements in pain when comparing exercise and control groups. In 1 study, investigators evaluated bracing without exercise and found no difference in pain between the brace and exercise groups. Investigators evaluated exercise combined with manual therapy in 3 studies and demonstrated improvement in pain relief in each study and improvement in strength in 1 study. In most studies, exercise also was shown to improve function. The improvement in function was statistically significant in 4 studies and clinically meaningful in 2 of these studies. In 2 studies, researchers compared supervised exercise with a home exercise program and found that function improved in both groups but was not different between groups. This finding might have resulted from a type II statistical error. In 4 studies, researchers did not find differences between acromioplasty with exercise and exercise alone for pain alone or for outcomes of pain and function.
The second aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Firstly, the absence of isometric KF MVC torque decrease confirms that our exercise only solicits the knee extensors and does not involve the knee flexors. Secondly, EMG RMS measured during KE MVCs shortly after exhaustion and during the recovery period was not altered by high intensity OLDE, confirming the results of a previous study [8]. Therefore, as a decrease in knee extensors force production capacity can be observed without concomitant changes in EMG signal, our data combined with the data of a previous study [8] suggest that EMG signal cannot be used to investigate dynamic exercise-induced muscle fatigue. The lack of changes in EMG signal is likely to be caused by a potentiation of the maximal evoked muscular wave (M-wave) induced by high intensity OLDE [8]. Finally, according to our hypothesis, isokinetic KE MVC torque quickly recovered and plateaued after exhaustion (within ~ 30 s at 60 and 100 deg/s, and within ~ 50 s at 140 deg/s). This quick recovery in torque production capacity is likely to be associated with recovery in both central and peripheral fatigue. This assumption is supported by one previous study in our laboratory demonstrating that not only peripheral and central fatigue, but also cortical and spinal excitability recovered shortly after exhaustion [8]. Froyd et al. [32] also demonstrated a significant recovery in skeletal muscle function within 1–2 minutes after completion of a one-leg isokinetic time trial performed at high intensity. Taking all together, these results demonstrate that to fully appreciate the extent of neuromuscular alterations induced by high intensity dynamic exercise, assessment of muscle fatigue must be performed within 30 s of cessation of the exercise.

In 1890, English-born American physician Edwin Checkley published ‘A Natural Method of Physical Training’ in which he presented his MMB philosophy. Checkley’s exercise method was non-competitive, did not encourage physical or mental exhaustion, and did not require equipment. The aim was ‘to feel naturally light and strong and to have an effective body.’9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Checkley expressed his dismay toward the vigorous and ‘unnatural’ athletic training methods utilized in the gymnasiums at the time, as well as toward the new mechanized ‘muscle-molding schemes’ he referred to as ‘straining’ more than ‘training.’ He criticized the ethics of aggressive performance-enhancing gymnastic and athletic training techniques claiming they were not natural, therefore harmful for the body and mind. In comparison, Checkley described animals in nature that sustain a lifetime of health, fitness, and beauty by performing seemingly effortless movements on a regular basis.9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Perhaps ironically, Checkley’s philosophy and exercises famously ‘converted’ Alan Calvert, the weightlifting pioneer who founded the Milo Bar-bell Company in 1902 and started Strength Magazine in 1914 (Figures 1, 2).12 Beckwith KA. Building Strength. Alan Calvert, the Milo bar-bell company, and the modernization of American weight training; PhD thesis. Austin: The University of Texas; 2006. [Google Scholar]
You won’t find another person like Brooke, in this whole world. The inspiration and motivation she carries is way beyond what most people hold. the knowledge she has about pregnancy and post pregnancy exercise is something you will want to connect with, and continue to work with. Taking a step to work with Brooke is making a choice to support your whole life: family, baby, body, mind, spirit. thank you Brooke for making exercise and fitness such an essential and safe part of pregnancy.

The novelty of the present study is that of demonstrating the possibility of applying a specific vigorous physical exercise program [17] on healthy elderly adults over 65 years and evaluating its effects on functional capacity using the classical SFT [3]. To administer the high exercise intensity, we used a HR control under continuous accurate visual monitoring by a sport scientist. As expected, after only 12 weeks of training, we found significant enhancements of almost all skills tested. Our results clearly show that our VE program is relevant and has a positive impact on people over 65 in helping them to maintain a high quality of life. The difference from most of the literature [18–22] regards the exercise protocol intensity, which is usually milder than ours. Also, in the aforementioned studies there was a poor attention about the consequences of the exercise program on general quality of life of subjects. They mainly focused on the attenuated risks of falling. On the contrary, the SFTs applied in our study clearly show that our VE program may ameliorate several motor abilities and in turn the general quality of life in healthy elderly adults over 65 years of age. However, two other studies showed that elderly people need to exercise close to their limit of maximum capacity [23, 24] to improve their physical fitness but, unlike the present research, they were conducted on patients who were in deconditioning status linked to their chronic illnesses.

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