These factors led to the success of Jack LaLanne's television program, The Jack LaLanne Show. His show popularized guided workouts on TV that were aimed towards women and ran from 1953 until 1985. Many of LaLanne's workouts encouraged viewers to use items that could be found in their own homes, like chairs, as exercise props. In the show's first episode, LaLanne spelled out the program's purpose: "“I’m here for one reason and one reason only: to show you how to feel better and look better so you can live longer."
As you strengthen your abs, it's vital to tone the back of the body as well. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet hip-width apart. Keep your arms at your sides and raise your hips without arching your back. Tighten the muscles of your buttocks and hamstrings, and hold for five breaths. Lower down one vertebra at a time to the floor if you're stopping here, or go on to the advanced posture.
These leisurely pursuits have their place, but there’s no substitute for the intensity of intervals and strength training or plyometrics. “When you reduce your intensity, athletic performance declines,” he says. “Cardiovascular fitness and other physiological metrics drop off.” Bone density suffers, too — particularly in women. In short, when you stop pushing yourself, you’ll become less fit, less healthy.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.1 article “Mechanisms and Mediators of the Skeletal Muscle Repeated Bout Effect” from author Rob Hyldahl. Skeletal muscle adapts to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating several but still poorly understood mechanisms that endow protection from subsequent damage. Known widely as the repeated bout effect, we propose that neural adaptations, alterations to muscle mechanical properties, structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and biochemical signaling work in concert to coordinate the protective adaptation.

Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
Natalie Jill is a very popular fitness trainer who you will see guest starring on some of the other sites and channels found in this list. Her best videos can be found on her personal fitness blog which shares workouts for weight loss, exercise ball routines, jump rope workouts, booty belt workouts, body weight exercises and more. Natalie also shares great healthy recipes and useful nutrition tips on her site.
Circuit training tips for beginners: my advice here depends on how physically demanding the circuit is. If you’re just getting into working out and you want to circuit train, start with some less challenging exercises as part of your circuit and consider decreasing the time from a minute for each circuit to 30 seconds (or whatever you’re comfortable and able to finish the circuit with). The same advice applies here as in some of the other sections above: it’s good to build a baseline level of strength and aerobic fitness before circuit training, but it also depends on your level of fitness when you start.
"Look for something with a lot of short segments," says Neporent. "This way, you can do a 10-minute set and you're not committed to a longer routine." When you're ready, you can add the segments together and the workout will still flow. DVD technology has made it easier for video exercisers to do short segments or put several together, depending on their ability
SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine web site. Michael R. Bracko, EdD, FACSM, chairman, American College of Sports Medicine's Consumer Information Committee. Rita Redberg, MSc, chairwoman, American Heart Association's Scientific Advisory Board for the Choose to Move program. Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief exercise physiologist, American Council on Exercise. Stephanie Siegrist, MD, orthopedic surgeon, Rochester, N.Y. Sal Fichera, exercise physiologist; owner, Forza Fitness, New York.
Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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