Most people instinctively move weights very quickly - they jerk upwards, lower the weight without much control, and tense up and use momentum to "bounce" the weight at both ends of the repetition. The instinct serves a purpose - the speed and bounce at the ends do allow heavier weight to be moved. In competitive weightlifting both explosive speed and momentum are essential.
After trying many different workout "schemes" with limited success, I bought this book and began doing Super Slow workouts. I'm now working out 6 times a month, spending less than 30 minutes in the gym for each workout, and I'm stronger than I've ever been. I've never experienced progress like this before. At 45 years old, my leg press has gone from 400 to 820 lbs. in a couple of months. The workouts aren't easy, but they're over quickly, and I'm able to spend more time with my family without feeling like I'm compromisng my health and fitness.
When performed at high intensity until exhaustion, OLDE has been shown to induce both peripheral and central fatigue [11, 17, 18]. However, as the exercise performed in these studies did not take place on the same ergometer where neuromuscular function was tested, the extent of peripheral and central fatigue remained unclear. To avoid the need to transfer the participant from the exercising ergometer to the dynamometer (to assess muscle fatigue), we recently developed in our laboratory a OLDE protocol on a dynamometer, reducing the time delay between cessation of the exercise and start of neuromuscular testing [8]. In this study, we demonstrated that both peripheral and central fatigue significantly recovered between exhaustion and after three minutes, but also that high intensity OLDE alters cortical and spinal excitability. Previous studies [8, 11, 17, 18] describing muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE focused only on isometric muscle fatigue (i.e. muscle fatigue measured during isometric contractions) and did not describe the extent of isokinetic muscle fatigue (i.e. muscle fatigue measured during isokinetic contractions) and its recovery. Consequently, an additional aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery induced by high intensity OLDE.

Exercise is key to good health. But we tend to limit ourselves to one or two types of activity. "People do what they enjoy, or what feels the most effective, so some aspects of exercise and fitness are ignored," says Rachel Wilson, a physical therapist at Harvard-affiliated Brigham and Women's Hospital. In reality, we should all be doing aerobics, stretching, strengthening, and balance exercises. Here, we list what you need to know about each exercise type and offer examples to try, with a doctor's okay.
This DVD is focused on strength training — you can choose whether you want to do an upper body workout, a lower body workout, an abs and back routine, or a quickie 10-minute total body workout. But don't think you have to already be super buff to jump in: This workout is designed for people of any fitness level — though you will need some equipment for it, like a stretch band and exercise ball.

The split jerk is a very powerful and fast move. HOW TO DO IT: The bar starts in the front rack position with your feet hip-width apart. Take a big breath to tighten your core, then dip straight down just a few inches to get more power. Next, drive the bar up overhead while splitting your legs into a lunge position. The goal is to get under the bar as fast as possible while driving the bar up overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.

Both groups exercised most frequently outdoors in nearby area and in nature (Fig. 5). Additional analyses showed that outdoors was the most frequently reported exercise location in both warmer (April–October) and colder (November–March) months. The MCT group had a significantly higher proportion of sessions outdoors than the HIIT group. Contrary, compared to the MCT group, HIIT had a higher proportion of sessions at a gym, sports facility and at home (Fig. 5).
Neuromuscular function tests were performed pre and post-exercise to quantify muscle fatigue. As previous studies documented the extent of isometric muscle fatigue induced by OLDE [8, 11, 17, 18], we chose to focus only on isokinetic muscle fatigue. Therefore, knee extensors (KE) MVCs were performed at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s pre (after the warm-up) and post-exercise (13 ± 4s after exhaustion). Subjects were asked to perform two maximal isokinetic knee extensions at each angular velocity (starting position corresponded to knee angle at 90 deg; range of motion was the same as the OLDE). The highest peak torque value of the two trials was considered, and a 20 s recovery was set between each set of KE MVCs. The order of contractions was randomized between sessions as follow (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s) and identical for testing pre and post-exercise of the same session. This randomization allows obtaining a time course of KE MVC torque recovery following the time to exhaustion test at each angular velocity was obtained at a different time point at each session: either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). An overview of timing can be found in Fig 1. Twenty seconds after completion of the last KE MVC, a maximal isometric MVC of the knee flexors was performed (isometric KF MVC). Visual feedback of the torque and strong verbal encouragement were provided for each MVC [please see reference 9 for more details].
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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