Jane Fonda’s Original Workout. The original. The classic. The one and only. Jane Fonda! Throwback your fitness routine (and break out the leg warmers!) with a workout video from this ‘80s exercise genius. Fonda will take you through aerobics, strength, and flexibility movements with options for beginners and advanced. The video is available for $9.99.
Founder Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow has been 'managed' by unscrupulous business partners, into a commercial entity bearing little resemblance to his original intention, (& no involvement with Mr Hutchins himself, nor any of his original associates). The -real- SS was revolutionary for its time, but Hutchins' new textbook, "The Renaissance of Exercise, a Vitruvian Adventure", is the result of his ongoing refinements over the past 18 years. Rather than pay over a $150 for the supposed historic value of a slim, soft-cover, dog-eared $10 book & it's relatively primitive ideas, get the new hard-cover textbook./It seems that one of the main criticisms os The Manual is "too much information". True, for a casual reader.The fact is, ANY exercise protocol is simple enough to write up on one or two pages: How many sets. How many reps. How many exercises. How often. About 10 exercise technique descriptions: Done. It's the precise whys, hows, & special cases that take a book to fulfill.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 46.4 article “Modulation of Energy Expenditure by Estrogens and Exercise in Women” from authors Kathleen M. Gavin, Wendy M. Kohrt, Dwight J. Klemm, and Edward L. Melanson. Reducing estrogen in women results in decreases in energy expenditure, but the mechanism(s) remain largely unknown. We postulate that the loss of estrogens in women is associated with increased accumulation of bone marrow–derived adipocytes in white adipose tissue, decreased activity of brown adipose tissue, and reduced levels of physical activity. Regular exercise may counteract the effects of estrogen deficiency.
Walking was the most common exercise type in both training groups (Fig. 3). Compared to HIIT, MCT had a significantly higher proportion of sessions with walking and resistance training. Contrary, compared to MCT, HIIT had a higher proportion of sessions with cycling, combined endurance and resistance training, other types of endurance training (e.g. aerobic, treadmill), jogging, swimming and dancing. There were no group differences regarding cross-country skiing and domestic activities (e.g. housework, gardening) (Fig. 3).
Publications, establishment recognition, and public support followed the success. In 1932, Fairbairn was elected President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.31 Fairbairn JS. Obituary. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 1944;51:152–6.10.1111/bjo.1944.51.issue-2[Crossref] [Google Scholar] In 1936, Morris (in collaboration with Randell) published ‘Maternity and Post-Operative Exercises,’ that illustrated exercises for pregnant and puerperal women and those who had been operated on. The book emphasized breathing, relaxation, conscious training of the pelvic floor muscles, and re-establishing good posture.32 Morris M. Maternity and post-operative exercises. London: Heinemann; 1936. [Google Scholar] A year later, Morris published ‘Basic Physical Training’ for the general public, dedicated to ‘all those who, realising the inter-dependence of mental and physical well-being, are working to raise the standard of health.’33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] In 1939, Randell published her seminal textbook ‘Training for Childbirth - From the Mothers Point of View’ which described her philosophy in detail with related anatomy and pathology and exercise descriptions and instructions.25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] This was followed up in 1949 with ‘Fearless Childbirth’, a practical manual for mothers-to-be.34 Randell M. Fearless childhood. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1953. [Google Scholar]
For Ready-Made or Make Your Own Workouts: Fitness Builder (iPhone or iPad)- This is one of my favorite exercise apps, offering a variety of ways to exercise. You can choose workouts based on the equipment you have, the muscle groups you want to work or the type of workout you're looking for. There are a range of ready-made workouts and you can also create your own workouts from the amazing database of exercises included.

Olympic soccer medalist and Fit As A Pro star Lauren Sesselmann is a big fan of the “running pyramid” for 30 seconds. “It’s a mix of cardio and balance that works your whole body. You count from one to ten then ten back down to one with high knees until 30 seconds is up,” she says. “Aim to get your knees up to hip height. Raise right knee, pause. Then raise left knee, followed quickly by the right knee and pause with the right knee still up high. Then do three knees fast and pause.” Continue till you’ve done ten high knees and then back it down to the beginning. The pause will allow you to work on your balance because you are landing quickly with one knee in the air and one the leg on the ground.
Why do we exercise? We all know it's good for our health, but have you ever thought about it?  Do you exercise the way you do because you've heard that's the way it should be done? Is it possible that the current way of working out could be good for some parts of our body, but bad for others... are we doing more harm than good? Are we spending more time exercising than we need to?

To strengthen and tone your abs, Marks says to go with V-Ups. Here’s his instruction: Begin lying on your back with your legs straight and arms extended overhead. Engage your core by pressing your lower back into the ground. Keeping your legs and arms straight, simultaneously lift your legs and torso up, reaching your hands toward your feet. Your body will form a “V.” Slowly lower to the starting position. And if you want an added challenge? Dempsey says “don’t let your arms and legs rest on the ground in between reps.” Ouch! If you’re working this hard (even for just 30 seconds!) don’t undo your efforts by making any of these 30 Flat-Belly Mistakes Women Make.
Where did we come up with the moves? Well, we tapped Josey Greenwell, certified trainer and Barry's Bootcamp instructor, to show us some of his favorite heart-pumping exercises. You can create your own routine by following our guidelines—or try his workout at the end of the article. Either way, you'll be burning fat and upping your cardiovascular endurance—win-win!
In 1912, John Shields Fairbairn, a leading consultant obstetrician at St Thomas Maternity Hospital, London, started a program to revolutionize the medical approach to child delivery.22 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004. [Google Scholar] This aimed to replace the 19th century medical practice of heavily medicating women during labor and the common use of force to deliver. To implement his vision of providing pregnant women with education and natural physical health for childbirth and recovery, Fairbairn chose Midwife and Physiotherapist Minnie Randell (1875–1974) to lead the newly founded St Thomas School of Physiotherapy, which served as the project’s education and training center.22,23 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004.

The main strength of this study is the large data material on exercise patterns. Most research on exercise pattern has used a cross-sectional design whereas we followed older adults over a one-year period and collected data from each exercise session they performed. Furthermore, this is the first study to assess differences in exercise patterns between older adults instructed to follow MCT versus HIIT.
The fact that GH did not perform as well as both other pituitary hormones in the present study could be the result of the large inter-individual variation in the NFO group. One of the NFO athletes had a very low resting value before the second exercise test and showed an increase of 12 000%. Cortisol concentrations after the second exercise test seem also quite good markers for OTS but poor when it comes to distinguish NFO from OTS. Although almost all OTS athletes showed a reduced increase in the response of cortisol to the second exercise bout, almost none of the NFO athletes showed an overshoot (table 2). This result is similar to earlier findings.10 22
Finally, although performing the lower trapezius strengthening exercise as described by Kuhn (standing with the arms at the sides and moving the shoulders into extension against resistance of an elastic band) is appropriate for individuals with moderate to high pain levels or altered scapulothoracic movement patterns, other exercises have demonstrated5 greater electromyographic activity levels of the lower portion of the trapezius muscle. The prone “Y” exercise (arm raised in line with the fibers of the lower trapezius) produces high levels of lower trapezius electromyographic activity and might be more effective for strengthening this muscle.5 After an individual's pain resolves and scapulothoracic movement patterns normalize, an athletic trainer or physical therapist might progress the individual to a more challenging position, such as the prone “Y” exercise.
Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.
A simple example of an eccentric contraction is to hold something in your hand with your elbow bent. Slowly allow your elbow to straighten out while holding the weight.  You can visualize your bicep muscle lengthening as you are holding the weight while you are slowly straightening your elbow.  This is an eccentric contraction or eccentric loading of your bicep muscle.
Start by lying on your back with your feet flat on the floor and your head resting in the palm of one hand and the other hand reaching toward your knees. Press your lower back down. Contract your abdominal muscles (abs) and in one smooth move, raise your head, then your neck, shoulders, and upper back off the floor. Tuck in your chin slightly. Lower back down and repeat.
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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