One way repeated ANOVA was used to compare time to exhaustion between sessions (S1, S2 and S3). Relative reliability was calculated with the intraclass correlation (ICC) model (3, 1) [27]. Absolute reliability was calculated with the typical error of measurement (the standard deviation of the change scores divided by [28, 29]). Bland and Altman’s 95% limits of agreement were also used (calculated for S1 vs S2, S1 vs S3 and S2 vs S3) as an additional representation of measurement error and to identify the presence of heteroscedasticity [19]. As data were heteroscedastic, both raw data and log transformed Bland and Altman’s plots are presented. Limit of agreement ratio (LOA) was also calculated from the log transformed data as follow: LOA = (1.96 × SDdiff / grand mean) × 100; where “SDdiff” represents the SD of the differences between tests (S1 vs S2, S1 vs S3, S2 vs S3) and “grand mean” represents (mean S1 + mean S2 + mean S3)/3. As time to exhaustion data were heteroscedastic, we also calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for each subject as follow: CV = 100×(SD of the three measurements)/(mean of the three measurements). Mean CV for all subjects were also calculated. We also calculated the smallest worthwhile change (0.2 × between subjects SD) [21].

Remember when the only thing your cell phone did was make phone calls? Now, you can waste all kinds of time with smartphone apps that allow you to do everything from playing Scrabble to exercising. Smartphones, iPads and MP3 players are excellent resources for home exercisers, particularly if you find yourself getting bored from doing the same old thing, day after day. With the right apps, you can find guided workouts, paced music, timers and more, all of which can add variety and fun to your home workouts.


Dewayne Riggins, celebrity trainer and Founder and CEO of Inspirational Fitness, says you can work your quads and glutes with reverse lunges—30 seconds on each leg. How to do them: Stand in an upright position and then step back with one leg; bend knees as low as you can. Drop your back knee to one inch off the ground or as low as you can and be sure front knee is not leaning over the foot. Repeat with the other leg.
In 1918 following WWI, Pilates returned to Germany where he started training dancers and quickly gained acclaim. However, to avoid Contrology being used by the German army, Pilates moved to the USA in 1925 and opened the Pilates Universal Studio in Manhattan.39,42 Balanced Body, Inc. [Internet]. Origins of Pilates. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/pilates/origins-of-pilates.html.
The positive trend shown here is an encouraging result in this population in relation to the possibility of increasing their ability in performing daily activities, reducing the occurrence of falls and potential femoral fractures. Further research is needed to understand how to design a vigorous exercise protocol, which may focus not only on aerobics but also on the different skills assessed by the SFT and which may include specific training sessions to enhance those particular skills, such as 8-foot up and go test. To maximize the functional/physical capacities of those over 65, a close link between high-intensity exercise and functional exercises is required. A mixed circuit training program including both kinds of the aforementioned exercises and measurable by SFT should be followed.
The world population is ageing and the number of older adults with chronic health conditions and physical limitations is expected to increase. This, in turn, could lead to an increased burden on healthcare services [1]. Regular physical activity is an important component of successful ageing and reduces the risk of developing several age- and lifestyle related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, dementia and type 2 diabetes [2–7]. However, making older adults exercise and keeping them in exercise programs is a major challenge [8]. Understanding how older adults prefer to exercise may help developing tailored exercise programs and increase sustained exercise participation in ageing populations.
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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