Brooke Cates created The Bloom Method with a strong desire to empower women before, during and after their pregnancies. Using innovative methods specific to The Bloom Method, TBM provides group fitness classes, workshops and 1:1 training to mamas in Boulder, Co as well as distance and travel training. Brooke is a Pre & Postnatal Corrective Exercise Specialist, Diastasis Recti + Core Rehabilitation Specialist and Pre and Postnatal Holistic Health Coach. Through her methodology, Brooke strives to provide women with the tools to help support their current pregnancy, empower them during birth, prevent common pregnancy-related injuries such as Diastasis Recti, Pelvic Floor Incontinence, and Prolapse while allowing her clients to experience a quicker healing phase post-baby and a stronger journey into motherhood. The Bloom Method’s one of a kind core techniques are smart, innovative, effective, and easy for any modern mom to implement. The Bloom Method’s smart approach to fitness is quickly revolutionizing Pregnancy and Postbirth Exercise within the industry.
LSR, SBS, HV, NPA, JEI, UW and DS contributed to the conception and design of the study. LSR, SBS, HV and DS were responsible for the collection of the Generation 100 data in cooperation with colleagues at the Cardiac Exercise Research Group at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. LSR, SBS and XT provided the data for analysis. LSR undertook the data analysis and drafted the manuscript. All authors provided critical insight and revisions to the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript submitted for publication.
During the time to exhaustion tests, all perceptual and physiological measurements increased over time. The increase in heart rate is similar to a previous study using the same exercise on a different ergometer [18]. Furthermore, these authors demonstrated that the respiratory system is not a limiting factor for this exercise. Despite we did not measure the maximum heart rate of our subjects via a typical whole-body incremental test (e.g. cycling), it is clear that a heart rate of ~ 130 beats/min is faraway of the maximum heart rate capacity of our subjects. Therefore, taking all together, these results confirm that high intensity OLDE performed until exhaustion is not limited by the cardiorespiratory system.
After trying many different workout "schemes" with limited success, I bought this book and began doing Super Slow workouts. I'm now working out 6 times a month, spending less than 30 minutes in the gym for each workout, and I'm stronger than I've ever been. I've never experienced progress like this before. At 45 years old, my leg press has gone from 400 to 820 lbs. in a couple of months. The workouts aren't easy, but they're over quickly, and I'm able to spend more time with my family without feeling like I'm compromisng my health and fitness.
I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.
The thruster is a compound movement, meaning that it is a multi-joint movement that works several muscle groups. HOW TO DO IT: The thruster begins in the front rack position across your chest. Squat down, keeping your chest big and knees out. Drive out of the bottom of the hole, similar to a front squat, while driving your knees out. Then use the force you are creating in the squat to drive the bar overhead. Then lock out your arms overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders, back and triceps.

In 1937, Randell’s number-two Thomas was sent to Australia to lecture on the St Thomas Project, teach the exercises, and assist local physiotherapists with the program’s implementation.35 Evans EP. The history of the New South Wales branch of the Australian Physiotherapy Association. Aust J Physiother. 1955;1(2):76–8.10.1016/S0004-9514(14)60817-5[Crossref] [Google Scholar] There are multiple indications of an unknown video Thomas made during this visit, and it was reported later that as a result of the visit, the St Thomas method was implemented in maternity hospitals in Sydney and Melbourne; the exercises were used by physiotherapists on an individual basis and that Thomas was remembered as a pioneer of Australian antenatal physiotherapy.29,35,36 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm.
I believe we are coming around to the conclusion that what was recommended for years by the medical community (30 minutes of "aerobic exercise" 3-5 times a week, getting the heart rate up to 80% max. for age, etc.) has been inadequate, and of too low an intensity level. When an activity is of sufficient intensity, and not of a certain duration or repeated a certain number of times, the body will initiate a total-body response (metabolic, HDL, glucose tolerance, blood pressure, bone mineral density, immune competency, etc.) It appears that if this level of intensity is never reached, regardless of the amount of time spent or the frequency it is repeated, the beneficial response by the body never occurs, or is at least blunted.
Fit septuagenarians may even need to be held back: “Strength training is super empowering,” she says. “And people get excited when they see and feel the results. I have older clients doing multiple timed sets of kettlebell swings. One older client biked 2,700 miles in 50 days. It takes a little longer, but they can reach really impressive levels of fitness.”
Now that the holidays are creeping around the corner, you may have to break up with your regularly scheduled sweat sessions, at least temporarily. And though the most wonderful time of the year may interfere with your fave spin class or butt-kicking bootcamp routine, it’s completely possible to stay fit—all you need is an Internet connection and a little living room space. (OK, and maybe a few props here and there.) And it’s all thanks to these seriously excellent, totally free workout videos. We’ve rounded up the best YouTube workouts—we’re talking everything from traditional aerobics to ballet to high-intensity interval training routines—so you can keep your physique in tip-top shape this season and beyond.
I created The Bloom Method with a desire to empower women before, during and after pregnancy. As a Pre & Postnatal Exercise Specialist, Core Rehabilitation Specialist and Pre and Postnatal Holistic Health Coach, I strive to provide women with empowering tools to help support your pregnancy, empower you during birth, prevent common pregnancy-related issues such as Diastasis Recti, Pelvic Floor Incontinence, and Prolapse. My clients that have experienced my methods experience a quicker healing phase post-baby.

In her hilarious, naked, and explicitly honest anecdote, she described her aversion to most fitness regimens ("I can't run because I piss myself . . . and fart at the same time"), her DVD workout — "Charlotte's 3-Minute Belly Blitz" — and her complete surprise at the intensity of the routine ("THAT'S the f*cking WARMUP?"). To be honest, most of us have been there, so this is pretty damn relatable.

While the focus of Pilates is strength training, you'll get some cardio in with moves like this. Stand with your belly pulled in and your arms overhead. Inhale and lower your head, bending the knees and swinging the arms back. Exhale and jump up with straight legs, reaching the arms overhead. Land with the knees slightly bent and return quickly to starting position. Do 8-10 reps at a rapid pace. You should be out of breath when you finish.


Yoga, which when translated from Sanskrit means “to control” or “to unite,” is said to have originated in India thousands of years ago. While its origins are based upon religion, many yoga classes today focus more on the connection between mind, body and spirit and achieving a balance within the body. Yoga concentrates heavily on body awareness, breathing and stretching.
Athletic trainers and physical therapists play important roles in the management of individuals with RCIS. When caring for this patient population, an athletic trainer or physical therapist performs a comprehensive initial examination. Information obtained from the examination is used, in part, to (1) identify impairments believed to be contributing to the individual's pain and functional limitations and (2) develop an impairment-based rehabilitation program. We believe that the prescription of specific evidence-based interventions designed to address the relevant contributory factors might be more appropriate than administering the same exercise program to everyone with RCIS. Ideally, individuals with RCIS would be classified into impairment-based subgroups and prescribed interventions specific to that subgroup. Although no treatment classification for patients with RCIS exists, this approach has been used to treat individuals with low back pain and has resulted in superior outcomes when compared with a general treatment approach.2
The goal with exercise is to work WITH our bodies and slowly condition over time. This is not a quick process because creating a “heal-thy” lifestyle takes diligence and consistency. The best way to avoid Post Exercise Malaise is to increase both duration and intensity SLOWLY over time and include adequate rest breaks and recovery time in between workouts.
Strength, weight, or resistance training. This type of exercise is aimed at improving the strength and function of muscles. Specific exercises are done to strengthen each muscle group. Weight lifting and exercising with stretchy resistance bands are examples of resistance training activities, as are exercises like pushups in which you work against the weight of your own body.
Whenever I’m feeling overwhelmed and super busy, the first thing that always falls off my schedule is hitting the gym—even though I know making the extra time to sweat it out will make me feel better and more centered. But I’ve realized that you can always find a way to prioritize the things that matter, even if you have to get creative with the way you fit them in.

How much time are you willing to devote (realistically) to working out? – Another question that being brutally honest with yourself is necessary. Pretending you will devote 2 hours to working out every day isn’t practical unless you do that in some form NOW. Most people can’t keep up a two hour a day workout program unless they are professional fitness trainers or competitors. Exercise videos come in all lengths and intensity levels. Some are very short; others may be 60-90 minutes long. Knowing how much time you have to devote to working out will help you choose an exercise video that provides what you need in the time frame you have available. This will also encourage you to continue using it.
I must confess: the title of this section is misleading, because while most of us associate the first home workouts with fitness icons Jane Fonda and Richard Simmons, they were not the first ones to bring workouts inside our homes. In fact, before there were VHS tapes, before there were even televised workouts, there were the audio-only vinyl record workouts, nicknamed vinylcise.
Dewayne Riggins, celebrity trainer and Founder and CEO of Inspirational Fitness, says you can work your quads and glutes with reverse lunges—30 seconds on each leg. How to do them: Stand in an upright position and then step back with one leg; bend knees as low as you can. Drop your back knee to one inch off the ground or as low as you can and be sure front knee is not leaning over the foot. Repeat with the other leg.
Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854.  Ling founded the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute in Stockholm in 1822, was an elected member of the Swedish General Medical Association, member of the Swedish Academy, and a Titular Professor. However, Ling remained indifferent to these honors due to the lack of the establishment’s implementation of his methods.7 Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854. [Google Scholar]
The positive trend shown here is an encouraging result in this population in relation to the possibility of increasing their ability in performing daily activities, reducing the occurrence of falls and potential femoral fractures. Further research is needed to understand how to design a vigorous exercise protocol, which may focus not only on aerobics but also on the different skills assessed by the SFT and which may include specific training sessions to enhance those particular skills, such as 8-foot up and go test. To maximize the functional/physical capacities of those over 65, a close link between high-intensity exercise and functional exercises is required. A mixed circuit training program including both kinds of the aforementioned exercises and measurable by SFT should be followed.
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