Equipment Needed? – Some exercise videos require equipment so this is something you will want to know ahead of time. Don’t wait until you buy the video, get it home and get ready to work out only to find out that you don’t have the stability ball or rubber bands required. Any equipment needed will be on the video case. Examples of equipment sometimes required in exercise videos are:

How to: Keep your feet shoulder-width apart and your back straight. Bend your knees and lower your rear as if you were sitting down in a chair. Your weight should be evenly distributed on 3 points of your feet -- heel, outaside ball, inside ball -- that form a triangle. Your knees won't stay in line with your ankles that way, but there will be less strain on other parts of your body.  Add dumbbells once you can do 12 reps with good form.
3.  Move v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y but smoothly. "Explosive" movement is not only nonproductive, but also dangerous. Plus, moving slowly eliminates momentum, which ensures constant muscle loading. Make a movement last about ten seconds. (A chin-up should take about ten seconds from the lowest to the highest point, and then another ten seconds from the highest to the lowest point. Same goes for a push-up.) There is nothing to be gained from fast movements. Moving slowly prevents injury. (There are over 30 million exercise related injuries annually in this country; most of these can no doubt be attributed to high-force movement.) Keep your movements low-force and high-intensity. An analogy: If you attempt to lift your car quickly, you will likely injure yourself even if using proper form. If you try lifting it slowly and intensely, your chances of injury are nil. Think of how you drive your car over speed bumps... fast will cause damage to the car's suspension, slow will not.
It’s no secret that Beyoncé is a crazy-good performer, and while we could never mimic her vocals, with some coaching, we thought we could pick up her dance moves. That’s why we were so excited to discover this video series featuring choreographer Frank Gatson, Jr., who breaks down every portion of Beyoncé’s Let’s Move! campaign, which features a remix of “Get Me Bodied.” Watch the first instructional portion and then the second one to learn the entire routine.
This is a lift that builds full-body power and tests the ability to move quickly. HOW TO DO IT: Start with the bar on the ground. Place your hands on the bar -- a little outside of your shins -- with the bar touching your mid shin. You should keep your weight on your heels with your chest big and pull the bar up like a deadlift, while driving the knees back so that the bar path stays perpendicular to the floor and you stay over the bar. This utilizes your hip hinge and activates your posterior chain. Once the bar passes the knees, you jump up (you may not actually leave the ground, but you should feel like you’re trying to) and shrug so that the bar comes as high as possible. The next step is for you to get under the bar or “catch” it as quickly as possible by squatting under the bar and changing the hand position underneath the bar, putting the body into a front squat position with the bar resting on the shoulders. You then stand the bar up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstring, calves, shoulders, core and traps.
Now that the holidays are creeping around the corner, you may have to break up with your regularly scheduled sweat sessions, at least temporarily. And though the most wonderful time of the year may interfere with your fave spin class or butt-kicking bootcamp routine, it’s completely possible to stay fit—all you need is an Internet connection and a little living room space. (OK, and maybe a few props here and there.) And it’s all thanks to these seriously excellent, totally free workout videos. We’ve rounded up the best YouTube workouts—we’re talking everything from traditional aerobics to ballet to high-intensity interval training routines—so you can keep your physique in tip-top shape this season and beyond.
Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854.  Ling founded the Royal Gymnastic Central Institute in Stockholm in 1822, was an elected member of the Swedish General Medical Association, member of the Swedish Academy, and a Titular Professor. However, Ling remained indifferent to these honors due to the lack of the establishment’s implementation of his methods.7 Georgi A. A biographical sketch of the Swedish poet and gymnasiarch, P.H. Ling. London: H. Bailliere; 1854. [Google Scholar]
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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