Video Abstract for the ESSR 44.4 article “The Age-Associated Reduction in Propulsive Power Generation in Walking” from author Jason R. Franz. Propulsive power generation during push-off in walking decreases with advancing age. A common explanation is an accommodation for sarcopenia and muscle weakness. Yet, muscle strengthening often yields disappointing outcomes for walking performance. We examine the hypothesis that declines in force or power generating capacity of propulsive leg muscles cannot fully explain the age-related reduction in propulsive power generation during walking.
The novelty of the present study is that of demonstrating the possibility of applying a specific vigorous physical exercise program [17] on healthy elderly adults over 65 years and evaluating its effects on functional capacity using the classical SFT [3]. To administer the high exercise intensity, we used a HR control under continuous accurate visual monitoring by a sport scientist. As expected, after only 12 weeks of training, we found significant enhancements of almost all skills tested. Our results clearly show that our VE program is relevant and has a positive impact on people over 65 in helping them to maintain a high quality of life. The difference from most of the literature [18–22] regards the exercise protocol intensity, which is usually milder than ours. Also, in the aforementioned studies there was a poor attention about the consequences of the exercise program on general quality of life of subjects. They mainly focused on the attenuated risks of falling. On the contrary, the SFTs applied in our study clearly show that our VE program may ameliorate several motor abilities and in turn the general quality of life in healthy elderly adults over 65 years of age. However, two other studies showed that elderly people need to exercise close to their limit of maximum capacity [23, 24] to improve their physical fitness but, unlike the present research, they were conducted on patients who were in deconditioning status linked to their chronic illnesses.

If you've been to yoga before, you'll recognize this as a near chaturanga—but a little faster. Start in a down dog position with hands on the ground, hips high in the air, and feet on the ground so you form a triangle shape. In a fluid motion, dive head toward the floor, coming into a low push-up position, and then swoop chest forward and up so you end in an upward dog position. From there, push hips up to return to starting position.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Mura G, Moro MF, Patten SB, Carta MG (2014). "Exercise as an add-on strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a systematic review". CNS Spectr. 19 (6): 496–508. doi:10.1017/S1092852913000953. PMID 24589012. Considered overall, the studies included in the present review showed a strong effectiveness of exercise combined with antidepressants. ...
Our exercise guide video animation feature is a great benefit since it shows you exactly how to perform each exercise safely and effectively. Multiple photos are merged together into a video style demonstration which displays the movement of the exercises smoothly which gives the viewer a real-time experience of how the exercise is performed. Under each exercise video is textual content with specific instructions and advice on how to properly execute the movement. This allows you to both visually see the exercise and read important facts about things you should follow when performing the exercises.
If you're one of those busy folks who thinks you simply don't have time to exercise, let this DVD prove you wrong. You'll get two 30-minute cardio-strength workouts: The first is a boxing workout, and the second is focused on strength training with weights. Meant to be quick, effective and empowering, these workouts will be over before you know it!
This Chinese martial art that combines movement and relaxation is good for both body and mind. In fact, it's been called "meditation in motion." Tai chi is made up of a series of graceful movements, one transitioning smoothly into the next. Because the classes are offered at various levels, tai chi is accessible — and valuable — for people of all ages and fitness levels. "It's particularly good for older people because balance is an important component of fitness, and balance is something we lose as we get older," Dr. Lee says.

Insanity: The Asylum is the "sequel" to Insanity, and it pushes you hard, further, deeper in ways that the original Insanity workout wasn't meant to do. I'm going to discuss what to expect in this DVD series, then tell you a little about my results. To give you some perspective, I'm almost 40, and only 2.5 months ago, weighed more than I ever had before (222 pounds). I'm pretty short, so I looked like a man-dumpling. I did insanity (all 63 days, never missed a workout), lost 22 pounds, and then was looking for the next thing to help me keep losing. Fortune struck, and this set came out at just the right time. I segued directly into this series. Here's the story.


Because CFS/ME is often related to viral issues or co-infections in the body, the immune system is "working overtime". CFS can actually be more debilitating than fibromyalgia, depending on the pain levels within fibro on any given day. This is simply due to the complex nature of CFS within the immune system. In fact, my preferred reference to this illness is not CFS but rather CFIDS or ME (Chronic Fatigue Immune Deficiency Syndrome OR Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)
The searches identified 80 studies, of which 11 met the inclusion criteria. In 5 studies, the diagnosis of RCIS was confirmed using an impingement test consisting of lidocaine injected into the subacromial space and elimination of pain with the impingement sign. Randomization methods were used in 6 studies, and blinded, independent examiners were involved in follow-up data collection in only 3 studies. Validated outcome measures were used in all studies. Follow-up was very good in 10 studies and was less than 90% in only 1 study. The specific exercise programs varied among studies. However, general treatment principles were identified among the different studies and included frequency, ROM, stretching or flexibility, strengthening, manual therapy (joint and/or soft tissue mobilizations), modalities, and others.
Here's how to do a perfect push-up: From a face-down position, place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Place your toes or knees on the floor, and try to create a perfect diagonal with your body, from the shoulders to the knees or feet. Keep the glutes [rear-end muscles] and abdominals engaged. Then lower and lift your body by bending and straightening your elbows, keeping your torso stable throughout.
I have used the standard protocol (10 seconds plus or minus two for both concentric and eccentric contractions) of this method, although sometimes I prefer going a bit faster such as 4/4, 6/6 or 8/8 seconds respectively. It is not easy and even a bit painful to do a single set of each exercise and "inroad" the muscles. Moving from machine to machine between exercises with no rest, one experiences tremendous cardio-respiratory workload (experiences counterpulsation due to very large venous return to the heart) and some feel extreme fatigue when finished. A workout can last as little as 10-12 minutes, based on 5 basic compound exercises (ie: ankle raise, trunk extension, squat, shoulder or chest press, pulldowns), and personally, I found I needed 2 workouts/week in order to achieve the strength gains I desired. Some think only one session per week is needed and I believe this is a personal and time management choice.

Lauren Duhamel, a trainer for modelFIT says doing 30 seconds of sumo squats will transform the glutes and inner thighs. “Take a wide stance with your feet turned out instead of facing straight forward. Keep all your weight on your heels and slowly bend your knees and sit your booty back and down,” she explains. “Then, press back up without locking out your knees. Do ten of these then hold in a low squat for ten seconds.”
The recent “consensus statement” of the European College of Sport Science indicates that the difference between NFO and OTS is the amount of time needed for performance restoration and not the type or duration of training stress or degree of impairment.1 In essence, it is generally thought that symptoms of OTS, such as fatigue, performance decline and mood disturbances, are more severe than those of NFO. However, there is no scientific evidence to either confirm or refute this suggestion.1 The distinction between NFO and OTS is most of the time based on “time to recover”. Hence, there is a need for objective, immediately available evidence that the athlete is indeed experiencing OTS.

Chronic stress and the subsequent chronic peripheral glucocorticoid secretion plays an important role in the desensitisation of higher brain centre response during acute stressors because it has been shown that in acute (and also chronic) immobilisation, the responsiveness of hypothalamic corticotrophin-releasing hormone (CRH) neurons rapidly falls.26 These adaptation mechanisms could be the consequence of changes in neurotransmitter release, depletion of CRH and/or desensitisation of hypothalamic hormonal release to afferent neurotransmitter input.26 Indeed, concentrations of CRH are elevated, the number of CRH-secreting neurons in the limbic brain regions is increased and the number of CRH binding sites in the frontal cortex is reduced secondary to increased CRH concentrations following chronic stress.25


Tracy Anderson: The Method For Beginners. Choose from a handful of workout DVDs from this celebrity trainer. She’ll have you working up a sweat doing cardio or more targeted moves for the arms, legs, and core. Anderson’s queue of videos range from about $2.99 to $9.99. Considering that Anderson has her own collection of studios across the globe that run about $45 per class, this is a steal!
Figure 1 Squat. Checkley9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] and Randell, reproduced with kind permission of Wellcome Library. Demonstrated by Barbara Mortimer Thomas.26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar]

Lauren Duhamel, a trainer for modelFIT says doing 30 seconds of sumo squats will transform the glutes and inner thighs. “Take a wide stance with your feet turned out instead of facing straight forward. Keep all your weight on your heels and slowly bend your knees and sit your booty back and down,” she explains. “Then, press back up without locking out your knees. Do ten of these then hold in a low squat for ten seconds.”

You won’t find another person like Brooke, in this whole world. The inspiration and motivation she carries is way beyond what most people hold. the knowledge she has about pregnancy and post pregnancy exercise is something you will want to connect with, and continue to work with. Taking a step to work with Brooke is making a choice to support your whole life: family, baby, body, mind, spirit. thank you Brooke for making exercise and fitness such an essential and safe part of pregnancy.
An essential move to any workout. Keep in mind that if doing a push-up on your toes is too tough, you can always start on your knees. It’s still a very effective strengthening move. HOW TO DO IT: Begin the push-up in a plank position with your hands on the ground under your shoulders and with your feet together, toes driving into the ground. Your body should be in one straight line with your core locked. Slowly lower yourself down to the ground so that your chest touches the ground, then push yourself back up to the starting position without collapsing your lower back. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, triceps, biceps and core.
In his new P90 DVD set, the supertrainer Tony Horton drops the "X" for an all-levels-welcome version of his wildly popular 90-day program. The 10 workouts—including total-body and core on the floor routines—are mapped out for you in a follow-along schedule. The modification options to the mix of cardio and resistance moves "make every set possible" for a gymlike intensity, testers said, all in 25 minutes. "It doesn't get much better than that," one reviewer raved.
Negative Sets. Weight training works with and against gravity. The motion towards the bar in a pull-up is called the "concentric movement," while heading back towards the ground is an "eccentric movement," or the negative portion of the movement. Resisting the pull of gravity during the negative porting of the movement taxes the muscles in a different way Myofibrillar disruption following acute concentric and eccentric resistance exercise in stregth-trained men. Gibala, M.J., Interisano, S.A., Tarnopolsky, M.A., et al. Department of Kinesiology (Neurology and Neurological Rehabilitation), McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmocology. 2000 Aug;78(8):656-61.. At the end of a long set, switch to just performing negatives (with a partner's help on the way up) or work towards getting those difficult bodyweight movements (like a pull up or dip) by only performing the negative of the movement. Sounds easy? Just try it!
The barre method uses your own body weight for resistance and focuses on small, deliberate movements that focus on specific groups of muscles, specifically muscles that aren’t used in other workouts. Muscles are worked to the point of fatigue, and then stretched for relief. Proper form, body alignment and posture is stressed, which in turn leads to an overall strengthening of core muscles and the appearance of an aligned, lean body.
This is what you should be doing before exercise to raise your heart rate and body temperature in preparation for the workout. During this type of warm-up, you moving through stretches and light exercises without stopping (as opposed to a passive stretches, which are held in place, like you do in a cool-down). This helps increase mobility and range of motion so you can get deeper into exercises. Here are five great dynamic warm-up stretches to try.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.4 article “Mechanisms Associated With Physical ActivityBehavior: Insights From Rodent Experiments” from authors Michael D. Roberts, Gregory N. Ruegsegger, Jacob D. Brown, and Frank W. Booth. Dopaminergic signaling differences in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) seemingly predispose rats to adopt different physical activity behaviors. Physical activity behavior also may be regulated through peripheral mechanisms (i.e., muscle and fat derived as well as hormonal signals). We hypothesize that physical activity behavior is regulated by the convergence of central and peripheral mechanisms onto the NAcc.
Samples were collected in prefrozen 4.5 ml K3 EDTA vacutainer tubes (Becton Dickinson Vacutainer System Europe, Plymouth, UK) and immediately centrifuged at 3000 rpm (Minifuge 2, Heraeus, Germany) for 10 min, and plasma was frozen at −20°C until further analysis. Samples were assayed via RIA for cortisol (DiaSorin, Stillwater, Minnesota, USA), ACTH (Nichols Institute Diagnostics, San Juan Capistrano, California, USA), PRL (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) and GH (Pharmacia & Upjohn Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden).

Squat between putting away dishes. During repetitive physical activities such as putting away dishes or loading the dishwasher, throw in squat, lunge, or other repetitive exercise between each repetition. This way, you'll naturally end up doing repetitions of exercises that need to be performed in repetition. putting each dish away or in the dishwasher.
If you don't have access to weights, then you can perform resistance exercises utilizing just the weight of your own body. These types of exercises include pull ups, push ups, crunches, squats, and lunges. If you'd like to find a well designed workout using body weight resistance, try the Slow Burn Fitness Revolution, which relies on slow movements to really increase intensity as you perform isotonic exercises.
Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This protocol was compared with standard protocols in 30 healthy male volunteers, each of whom performed four exercise tests: the STEEP treadmill and bicycle protocols, a modified Bruce treadmill protocol, and a 20 W/min bicycle protocol. During the two STEEP tests the subjects' oxygen consumption rose gradually and exponentially and there was close agreement between the bicycle and the treadmill protocols. A higher proportion of subjects completed the treadmill than the bicycle protocol. Submaximal heart rates were slightly higher during the bicycle test. The STEEP protocol took less time than the modified Bruce treadmill protocol, which tended to produce plateaux in oxygen consumption during the early stages. The 20 W/min bicycle protocol does not take account of subjects' body weight and consequently produced large intersubject variability in oxygen consumption. The STEEP protocol can be used on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer and it should be suitable for a wide range of patients.
Jumping is the purest form of explosiveness. In this move, the athlete starts from the ground and jumps onto a box of a certain height – start with a lower height box and build your way up. HOW TO DO IT: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart, and drop down to a quarter squat. Then, drive your arms up as they explode out of the quarter squat and onto the box. Once your feet land on the top of the box, you open your hips and stand up. To repeat, you can “plyo” the jump by rebounding immediately off of the ground. An alternate way of completing repeated box jumps is to step down off of the box before jumping back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves.
Pilates is a fitness method that was developed by Joseph Pilates in Germany during World War I. Originally intended to help rehabilitate injured soldiers, Pilates broadened his method to help people of all walks of life, including police officers and dancers, to strengthen their bodies. His method stressed the use of the mind to control the muscles and was often used to help heal and build strength in individuals who were recovering from injuries.

The plank is a yoga position that is basically a push up at the top of the action; you're suspending your body in a straight line from your toes while holding your body at an incline with your arms pressing straight up from the ground. Better yet, you're squeezing your abdominal muscles while you're holding the position. This works the transverse abdominis, the deepest-lying of the abdominal muscles. Though not visible, strengthening it will enhance your core stability and posture, both of which add to the effect of an upright profile.

One near constant at this age is stiffer joints. Movement of all kinds — which floods joints with oxygenated blood — is helpful. But mobility and flexibility exercises that involve large, controlled ranges of motion in the ankles, hips, shoulders, and upper back can be particularly effective. Try a yoga class, and work mobility into your daily routine as well — anytime and anywhere. Gently stretch however it feels good, and as often as you remember.


Planning and preparation are important when you're getting started with exercise, but to be successful, you also need momentum—and the more you can create, the easier it is to stay motivated. The best way to build and maintain momentum is with action. While it's great to ponder your weight-loss goals, think about motivation, and work on your commitment to exercise, there's something to be said for just doing it—before too much contemplation drains your energy. It's easy to spend too much time researching, reading, and exploring rather than actually doing the exercise.
Around thirty years ago, Andersen et al. [10] developed a novel exercise model (i.e. one leg dynamic exercise, OLDE) allowing dynamic isotonic contractions of the knee extensor muscles. This exercise model isolates the knee extensor muscles via an active knee extension and passive knee flexion, and due to the reduced muscle mass involved, this exercise is not limited by cardiorespiratory function [11]. Therefore, this model was extensively used to investigate the effect of OLDE on the cardiorespiratory system (e.g. [12]), skeletal muscle physiology (e.g. [13]) but also with patients suffering from cardiorespiratory limitations [14, 15] or for studying mechanisms regulating circulatory response to rhythmic dynamic exercise [6, 16]. More recently, high intensity OLDE has been used to investigate CNS processes involved in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance [8, 11, 17, 18]. Despite being recently used to investigate muscle endurance, the reliability of high intensity OLDE has not been tested. Reliability can be defined as the consistency of a performance measure, and should be established for any new measurement tool [19, 20]. Furthermore, reliability of a protocol can be used to estimate the sample size required for an appropriate statistical power [20]. The main aim of this study was to establish the reliability of high intensity OLDE as a measure of muscle endurance. Additionally, as the sensitivity of a protocol reflects its ability to detect small changes in performance, we also calculated the smallest worthwhile change as a measure of sensitivity [21].

For Paced Audio Workouts: MotionTraxx (iPhone or iPad) - This music-based app is another great option for home exercisers, particularly if you're a walker or runner. Deekron the Fitness DJ has put together an incredible variety of music mixes, all set at different beats per minute, so you can find the perfect pace for any workout - Walking, running, lifting weights or other activities. There are also coached workouts (these cost extra) available at iTunes.


In the 1950s postwar period, American capitalism prospered and families began moving to the suburbs. This led to an increase in automobile sales, as driving became a more viable transportation option than walking or taking public transportation, which took a small toll on public health. At the same time, families increasingly owned televisions and stay-at-home mothers spent much of their time at home during the day. As such, stay-at-home mothers became television's primary audience during the day, and created a market for televised workouts.
DOMS stands for delayed onset muscle soreness, which is the soreness you feel the day or two after a hard workout. This happens because when you’re working out you’re damaging muscle fibers (that’s a good thing!). The muscle then repairs and rebuilds and that’s how you get stronger. The soreness and pain you feel from DOMS comes from the chemicals that set off pain receptors during the repair process, Robert Hyldahl, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist at Brigham Young University, previously explained to SELF. This soreness may last anywhere from 24 to 72 hours after your workout. (Here’s what to do when DOMS kicks in after a workout.)
I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.
This powerful upper-body toner can be done on a mat, reformer, or Wunda chair. If using a mat, sit with your legs straight in front of you, feet together and flexed. Press your hands flat on the mat, look down, and use your upper body strength to lift your backside and upper legs. Swing yourself forward and backward before lowering slowly to the mat. Do five reps.
“Foam rolling is a form of massage (or trigger point release) that you can do to loosen tight muscles to help improve your mobility,” says Lefkowith. Using a foam roller helps smooth out “knots” in your fascia (the layer of connective tissue surrounding your muscles), which can get in the way of your range of motion. This is crucial for performing exercises with correct form and making sure the right muscle fibers are firing away. While you can stop, drop, and foam roll anytime, it’s often recommended to spend a few minutes with the foam roller before your workout to help get the juices flowing.

Early motor skills and development have also shown to be related to physical activity and performance later in life. Children who have more proficient motor skills early on are more inclined to being physically active, and thus tend to perform well in sports and have better fitness levels. Early motor proficiency has a positive correlation to childhood physical activity and fitness levels, while less proficiency in motor skills results in a tendency to partake in a more sedentary lifestyle.[20]
I've always wanted to try out the trendy fitness classes at Physique 57 in NYC, but they run a pretty penny. Now, the infamous Physique 57 technique (certain muscles are targeted, overloaded to point of fatigue and then stretched for relief) is available to all in this 30-minute workout. It was just enough to make me realize why people are obsessed with the classes and left me — especially my glutes — sore the next day.

Exercise is a key part of staying healthy, but figuring out how to get more active can be tough. If you’re not used to physical activity, start slow. Go for 10 to 15 minute walks, and work your way up to briskly walking or jogging for 30 minutes daily. Try adding strengthening exercises 2 or 3 days per week, and consider boosting your flexibility with yoga or Pilates classes. Whenever you work out, always listen to your body’s limits, and ask your doctor for advice if you have a history of any medical issues.


There are tons of exercise videos for sale on the market today. That makes finding one that you will enjoy and use both overwhelming but entirely possible since so many are out there. Following the information in these exercise videos buyer’s guide will help you narrow down your choices based on your needs and fitness goals and choose one that you will enjoy and benefit from as well. Knowing what to look for is the most important step in making the right choice for your needs. With so many styles and choices available you can even decide to buy several so you have a good variety to choose from. Boredom is one of the biggest reasons people stop their workouts, so giving yourself choices can alleviate this problem completely.
Greg Brookes is the founder of GB Personal Training Ltd and KettlebellsWorkouts.com. He has been featured in Men's Health, Women's Fitness, Men's Fitness, and Health & Fitness Magazine, where he wrote a monthly column. He has also been featured in the majority of UK national newspapers. Labelled as "the trainer to the trainers" he delivers seminars and a regular newsletter to help Personal Trainers improve their skills and achieve better results for their clients. Continue reading

In the third week of the program we step it up to a three-day training split: Train all “pushing” bodyparts (chest, shoulders, triceps) on Day 1; hit the “pulling” bodyparts (back, biceps) and abs on Day 2; and work your lower body (quads, glutes, hamstrings, calves) on Day 3. As in Week 2, you train each bodypart twice a week, so you’ll hit the gym six days this week.


The neurobiological effects of physical exercise are numerous and involve a wide range of interrelated effects on brain structure, brain function, and cognition.[33][34][35][36] A large body of research in humans has demonstrated that consistent aerobic exercise (e.g., 30 minutes every day) induces persistent improvements in certain cognitive functions, healthy alterations in gene expression in the brain, and beneficial forms of neuroplasticity and behavioral plasticity; some of these long-term effects include: increased neuron growth, increased neurological activity (e.g., c-Fos and BDNF signaling), improved stress coping, enhanced cognitive control of behavior, improved declarative, spatial, and working memory, and structural and functional improvements in brain structures and pathways associated with cognitive control and memory.[33][34][35][36][37][38][39][40][41][42] The effects of exercise on cognition have important implications for improving academic performance in children and college students, improving adult productivity, preserving cognitive function in old age, preventing or treating certain neurological disorders, and improving overall quality of life.[33][43][44]
The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology has published "The Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness & Lifestyle Approach", which details fitness assessment protocols. One such protocol, the mCAFT, is designed to give information about the aerobic fitness of a person, while using minimal equipment. The subject works by lifting its own body weight up and down double steps (40.6 cm in height total) while listening to set cadences from a compact disc. The end-stage of the age and gender specific stepping rate requires 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. The heart rate increases approximately in a linear fashion from 50% to 100% of maximal oxygen intake. The heart rate does not decrease significantly during the first fifteen seconds of recovery. Thus, one can predict an aerobic fitness using the heart rate right after exercise of a known sub-maximal rate of working.
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