The Bloom Method is a unique system that is based on solid evidence compiled by our founder through her years of working individually with thousands of women in pregnancy, early post birth and well into motherhood. The Bloom Method combines cutting edge-core techniques, breathing practices, functional [mom] movements, strength training, Lagree [pilates] based moves, HiiT [for postnatal moms] and groundbreaking philosophies into one life-changing exercise method. 
Rotator cuff impingement syndrome (RCIS) is a multifactored disease that can lead to functional limitations and an inability to participate in work, leisure, and sporting activities. This syndrome can be caused by many factors, such as weakness of the rotator cuff and periscapular muscles, decreased pectoral and rotator cuff muscle flexibility, abnormal motion patterns, extrinsic factors (eg, vibration exposure, use of hand tools, work-station height), and trauma. Kuhn provided a valuable synopsis of randomized controlled clinical trials in which the benefit of exercise for individuals with RCIS was examined. Substantial evidence1 exists to support the use of exercise for the management of this patient population. In addition, manual therapy has been shown1 to augment the effectiveness of exercise. However, we believe it is premature to label the proposed rehabilitation protocol as a criterion standard because of the lack of specific exercise descriptions, variability in the exercise programs, and inability to separate the effects of specific exercises on the measured outcomes that Kuhn noted. Furthermore, because RCIS is multifactored, use of the same exercise protocol to treat everyone with RCIS might not be the best standard of care.
The OLDE protocol and neuromuscular function tests were performed on a Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer (CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). The axis of the dynamometer was aligned with the knee axis, and the lever arm was attached to the shank with a strap. Two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Full description of the OLDE protocol can be found in Pageaux et al. [8]. Briefly, this protocol allows isolating the knee extensor muscles during a dynamic exercise involving an active isotonic knee extension (from 10 deg to 90 deg, 0 deg = knee fully extended) and a passive knee flexion. The passive flexion angular velocity was set up at 300 deg/s automatically cushioned by the dynamometer for safety purposes. Due to this cushion, the passive knee flexion angular velocity was ~ 180 deg/s. According to a previous study [8], a cadence of 50 contractions per minute (cpm) was chosen (knee extension angular velocity ~ 106°/s). Subjects maintained a cadence of 50 cpm at all visits via the use of a metronome. Power output produced by the subject was controlled according to the formula:
This program isn’t just for the true beginner who has never touched a weight before; it’s also suitable for anyone who has taken an extended leave of absence from training. How long has it been since you went to the gym regularly? Six months? A year? Five years? No worries: The following routines will get you back on track in—you guessed it—just four short weeks. Let’s get to work.

I've been climbing for about a year. This book provides a lot of fundamental techniques for things such as warmup and antagonist training. It's easy to get overzealous when it comes to training but the book gives you keys to build a strong foundation and helps you identify what your already doing right. I will be applying the information to my training.
Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This protocol was compared with standard protocols in 30 healthy male volunteers, each of whom performed four exercise tests: the STEEP treadmill and bicycle protocols, a modified Bruce treadmill protocol, and a 20 W/min bicycle protocol. During the two STEEP tests the subjects' oxygen consumption rose gradually and exponentially and there was close agreement between the bicycle and the treadmill protocols. A higher proportion of subjects completed the treadmill than the bicycle protocol. Submaximal heart rates were slightly higher during the bicycle test. The STEEP protocol took less time than the modified Bruce treadmill protocol, which tended to produce plateaux in oxygen consumption during the early stages. The 20 W/min bicycle protocol does not take account of subjects' body weight and consequently produced large intersubject variability in oxygen consumption. The STEEP protocol can be used on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer and it should be suitable for a wide range of patients.
We've said it before, but HIIT really does the job when you want to trim ab fat: A study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that people who did two HIIT and two strength sessions a week lost more visceral fat (11 percent of the dangerous kind around your organs)—about an extra inch from their waist—than those who ran twice and did two strength sessions. Plus, many of those speedy intervals, such as sprints, are total-body moves that engage your abs big time. Do speed bursts on a cardio machine or try three-minute boxing rounds (another transverse tightener) with a minute of active recovery in between. This unique HIIT workout incorporates some boxing moves and some weight training for double the benefits. (Don't get along with HIIT training? Studies show adding music will make it more enjoyable.)

The “Lying Bicycle” is one of the “gold standards” of abdominal moves according to Marie. “If it’s performed correctly, you will be targeting all areas of your abdominals and core for a tinier, tighter waistline.” To do it: Lie on your back on a mat, placing both hands at the base of your head to lightly support your head and neck (do NOT “yank”). In one continuous motion, bring one knee up to your chest and crunch up angling the opposite elbow towards that knee. Without pausing, alternate while bringing the other elbow up and toward the other knee. Perform this move in a fluid continuous motion without pausing. Count ten reps on each side. Rest and then begin again. Marie says to be sure not to “yank or turn your head,” as this move is done by the abdominals, not your neck. “Crunch up as much as you can throughout the start and finish,” she says. “Extend your legs completely; don’t just ‘cycle’ your feet.”
The exercises listed in Week 1 are a collection of basic moves that, while also used by advanced lifters, we feel are suitable for the beginner as well. Notice we’re not starting you off with only machine exercises; a handful of free-weight movements are present right off the bat. Reason being, these are the exercises you need to master for long-term gains in muscular size and strength, so you may as well start learning them now. Carefully read all exercise descriptions before attempting them yourself.

Notice in the workouts below that your first set calls for eight reps, your second set 10 reps and your third set 12. This is referred to in bodybuilding circles as a “reverse pyramid” (a standard pyramid goes from higher to lower reps), where you decrease the weight each set to complete the higher rep count. For example, if on your first set of lat pulldowns you used 140 pounds for eight reps, try using 120 or 130 pounds on set two and 100–120 pounds on set three.
Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.  Pilates swiftly gained prominence with dancers and celebrities, which led to his notoriety as a New York City exercise personality. In 1932, Pilates taught Contrology exercises at the mythological Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival as he did every summer until 1951.42,43 Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.
KE MVCs were performed at 60, 100 and 140 deg/s. Testing was performed pre-exercise (pre, average of all three sessions pre-exercise values), shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). As pre-exercise values for the EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s differ between sessions (P = 0.038), its time course was not analyzed. Planned comparisons failed to demonstrate significant difference between means for EMG RMS RF at 140 deg/s. VL, Vastus Lateralis muscle; RF, Rectus Femoris muscle; VM, Vastus Medialis muscle, KE, knee extensor muscles (sum VL, RF and VM). Data are presented as mean (SD).
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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