The results of this study present evidence in favor of this high intensity OLDE protocol to investigate muscle fatigue and muscle endurance. Indeed, this new protocol developed in our laboratory i) presents a lower variability than other high intensity time to exhaustion tests [20], ii) is not limited by the cardiorespiratory system and iii) allows a quick start of neuromuscular testing to fully appreciate the extent of muscle fatigue induced by the exercise. Therefore, it can provide an interesting tool to isolate the cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular effects of various manipulations supposed to play a role in muscle fatigue and performance during high intensity dynamic endurance exercise (e.g. spinal blockade of afferent feedback from the working muscles).
The wall sit, also known as a static squat, is performed by placing one's back against a wall with feet shoulder width apart, and lowering the hips until the knees and hips are both at right angles. The position is held as long as possible. The exercise is used to strengthen the quadriceps. Contrary to previous advice in this section, this exercise is NOT good for people with knee problems because the knees bear most of the load, especially when they are held at right angles (90 degrees).[citation needed]
Preliminary evidence from a 2012 review indicated that physical training for up to four months may increase sleep quality in adults over 40 years of age.[78] A 2010 review suggested that exercise generally improved sleep for most people, and may help with insomnia, but there is insufficient evidence to draw detailed conclusions about the relationship between exercise and sleep.[79]
... Consequently, it was suggested that when determining LT in trained subjects, at least 8-min stages should be used ( Foxdal et al., 1996;Weltman et al., 1990). However, using such a stage duration would not allow maximal tasks to be assessed, since the duration of the whole procedure could result in an excess of fatigue or motivation ( Buchfuhrer et al., 1983). This was shown to compromise the V Á O 2max and maximum work-rate achievements (Bentley et al., 2007). ...
Barre workouts are appropriate for individuals of all fitness levels. It is ideal for individuals who wish to improve their core strength and posture. Many of us often sit in a hunched position at a desk or in front of a computer for long periods, and it takes its toll over time. Barre is appropriate for individuals who are seeking an intense but low-impact workout that will offer quick results.

Just shy of an hour long, this video is a killer aerobic kickboxing workout. You’ll throw punches and kicks in supercharged sequences as you follow along with the ebullient Billy Blanks. Don’t be surprised if you start talking back to the screen, especially when Blanks looks straight into the camera and declares, “I see you at home! Keep going!” Talk about motivation.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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