Ever notice how dancers have killer abs, despite never hitting the floor for crunches? There’s a reason for that — every move a dancer makes engages their abs. This quick workout with Heather Graham of BeFit walks you through the moves you need to shake your body like a dancer while getting an effective core workout, not to mention your fair share of cardio. This is a low-impact routine perfect for those just getting back into exercise.

It’s not an exact science, but when you hear the term plyometric, you can go ahead and think jumping and breathlessness. Examples would include squat jumps, box jumps, broad jumps, and burpees. One of the main purposes of these explosive exercises is increasing power, says Laferrera. Having more power means you can recruit muscle fiber faster and more efficiently, which pays off when you’re moving heavy objects or working on sprinting drills in the gym, adds Lefkowith. Plus, because these moves get your heart rate up, they’re big calorie-burners. Here are seven plyometric moves you can do at home.
* Strength building is an expensive metabolic process. Although we see it as building muscle, our body is making global metabolic adaptations. It is upgrading its metabolic efficiency by synthesizing more enzymes to make metabolism more capable. This includes aerobic metabolism, anaerobic metabolism, gluconeogenesis, glycogen breakdown and transport, blood buffering agents, and of course new muscle fiber growth. All of this new synthesis is extremely metabolically expensive; that is why your body will not make these changes unless an intense stimulus is applied, and the organism is left undisturbed afterwards to make these changes.
Jump up ^ Blondell SJ, Hammersley-Mather R, Veerman JL (May 2014). "Does physical activity prevent cognitive decline and dementia?: A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies". BMC Public Health. 14: 510. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-510. PMC 4064273. PMID 24885250. Longitudinal observational studies show an association between higher levels of physical activity and a reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. A case can be made for a causal interpretation. Future research should use objective measures of physical activity, adjust for the full range of confounders and have adequate follow-up length. Ideally, randomised controlled trials will be conducted. ... On the whole the results do, however, lend support to the notion of a causal relationship between physical activity, cognitive decline and dementia, according to the established criteria for causal inference.
In 1912, Alexander claimed that the principles of ‘conscious control’ constitute an unfailing remedy for disease, including the cases of shortening of the spine, an injured arm, and a golfer who is practicing his swing.21 Pilates and Alexander [Internet]. Macy JA. Alexander Technique and the Pilates method of movement re-education: A biomechanical perspective. 2010 Dec 6 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pilatesandalexander.com/articles/macy/. [Google Scholar] Alexander was against weightlifting, claiming that their focus on isolating muscles did not address the short- and long-term damage of impaired functional movements: ‘The physical body thus had two existences ... one fiercely active, muscular, dynamic, the other sedentary, nervous, static.’21 Pilates and Alexander [Internet]. Macy JA. Alexander Technique and the Pilates method of movement re-education: A biomechanical perspective. 2010 Dec 6 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://pilatesandalexander.com/articles/macy/. [Google Scholar] He allied himself with the turn of the 20th century MMB movement emergence:20 Alexander FM. Man's supreme inheritance. London: Methuen; 1910. [Google Scholar]

In 1912, John Shields Fairbairn, a leading consultant obstetrician at St Thomas Maternity Hospital, London, started a program to revolutionize the medical approach to child delivery.22 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004. [Google Scholar] This aimed to replace the 19th century medical practice of heavily medicating women during labor and the common use of force to deliver. To implement his vision of providing pregnant women with education and natural physical health for childbirth and recovery, Fairbairn chose Midwife and Physiotherapist Minnie Randell (1875–1974) to lead the newly founded St Thomas School of Physiotherapy, which served as the project’s education and training center.22,23 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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