I have used the standard protocol (10 seconds plus or minus two for both concentric and eccentric contractions) of this method, although sometimes I prefer going a bit faster such as 4/4, 6/6 or 8/8 seconds respectively. It is not easy and even a bit painful to do a single set of each exercise and "inroad" the muscles. Moving from machine to machine between exercises with no rest, one experiences tremendous cardio-respiratory workload (experiences counterpulsation due to very large venous return to the heart) and some feel extreme fatigue when finished. A workout can last as little as 10-12 minutes, based on 5 basic compound exercises (ie: ankle raise, trunk extension, squat, shoulder or chest press, pulldowns), and personally, I found I needed 2 workouts/week in order to achieve the strength gains I desired. Some think only one session per week is needed and I believe this is a personal and time management choice.
Spark People shares short videos for all different types of workouts. There are several categories -- Abs, Cardio, Yoga and Pilates, as well as others that diver into healthy cooking and eating ideas. These workouts are great when you are pinched for time. Choose a 10-12 minute routine and squeeze in some activity where you normally would have skipped it altogether.
Cardio-wise, there's no need to completely abandon what you love. Just tweak it. "At least one day a week, do a different activity than usual," Dixon advises. "If you're a walker, hit the pool. If you're a cyclist, get to know the rowing machine." Increase intensity during your second cardio workout of the week, and up your workout time during the third session. "Those three changes will keep your body guessing," she says.
The question used to assess location of exercise had the following response options: home, outdoor in nearby area, nature, gym, indoor- and outdoor sports facility. Indoor- and outdoor sports facility was categorized as “sports facility” due to a low response rate on the outdoor sports facility option (1%). For social setting of exercise, the response options were: exercised alone, exercised together with others, and organized by Generation 100.
Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.  He was later moved to the Isle of Man where he had duties training the injured inmates in their wards. It was there that Pilates started to connect springs to the hospital bed frames modifying them into effective and comfortable exercise devices which later evolved to become modern Pilates equipment.43 Hessel J [Internet]. Joseph H. Pilates biography. 2015 Jul 8 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.jillianhessel.com/pilates_biography.html. [Google Scholar]

First, a disclaimer: I have no financial stake in the sale of any of the other books mentioned below in my review of "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol". I'm just interested in promoting safe, logical, scientifically sound methods for people that care about being in good physical condition without any unnecessary risks or wasted time. Any other books or authors mentioned are merely for the purpose of expanding the information available regarding the history (and refinements) of High Intensity Training (HIT) since Arthur Jones first began to popularize the method in the early 1970's.


17.  If you're getting a normal amount of usable protein (about one gram per five pounds of body weight), your body will require a bit more protein than usual as you increase lean muscle tissue). Uncooked protein is preferable to cooked protein (cooking denatures proteins, damaging them, and making them appear as a foreign invader to the body which can trigger an autoimmune response). A good source of protein is fruits, vegetables, and nuts. (Yes, nuts have fat too, but it's "good" fat, and your body needs fat in your diet; you can have a lean body while eating the right kinds of fat!) Give your body the additional protein as it asks for it. Listen carefully, and you'll know when. Remember, it's very difficult to get too little protein; most people get way too much, and too much protein is a cause of degenerative disease. (See Fact or Fiction: High protein diets are great for losing weight)


Negative Sets. Weight training works with and against gravity. The motion towards the bar in a pull-up is called the "concentric movement," while heading back towards the ground is an "eccentric movement," or the negative portion of the movement. Resisting the pull of gravity during the negative porting of the movement taxes the muscles in a different way Myofibrillar disruption following acute concentric and eccentric resistance exercise in stregth-trained men. Gibala, M.J., Interisano, S.A., Tarnopolsky, M.A., et al. Department of Kinesiology (Neurology and Neurological Rehabilitation), McMaster University, Hamilton, ON, Canada. Canadian Journal of Physiology and Pharmocology. 2000 Aug;78(8):656-61.. At the end of a long set, switch to just performing negatives (with a partner's help on the way up) or work towards getting those difficult bodyweight movements (like a pull up or dip) by only performing the negative of the movement. Sounds easy? Just try it!
If you want to form a gym habit, it can be difficult to know what to do or how to workout. Once you become immersed in exercise, it can feel like there’s not enough time to try all the different things! Plain and simple, this is just a knowledge gap. Learning how to workout is like learning anything else, it requires time, research and study. Hiring a personal trainer is the fastest route around this, but it also helps to be a “student of the game” by continuing to educate yourself.

Pilates and his followers stood apart from the other MMB schools for surviving a turbulent century, for making multiple millions of people healthier in mind and body and for being a major force in reintroducing mind–body methods to healthcare establishments today. Furthermore, Pilates deserves credit for inventing his ingenious exercise equipment, which uniquely blends in harmoniously with the universal mind–body philosophy.


The MCT group was prescribed two weekly exercise sessions of 50-min continuous activity at 70% of peak heart rate, or approximately 13 on the Borg 6–20 rating of perceived exertion (RPE) scale [20]. The HIIT group was prescribed two exercise sessions a week with 10-min warm-up followed by 4 × 4 min intervals at 85–95% of peak heart rate, or approximately 16 on the Borg 6–20 RPE scale. The participants were given individual oral and written information about the training methods, including information about frequency, duration, intensity and examples of exercise sessions. The participants were free to exercise individually, with an exercise type and at a location of their own choosing. Every sixth week the participants met for a supervised spinning session where they exercised with a heart rate monitor. These exercise sessions gave the participants an opportunity to control their intensity during exercise. In addition, organized group exercise was offered twice per week for motivational purposes. Attendance to these exercises was voluntary and the activity performed varied between indoor and outdoor activities such as walking, jogging and aerobics [19]. Besides the two prescribed exercise sessions, the participants were free to exercise as desired.
"Consider this: Dr. Kenneth Cooper (author of Aerobics, The New Aerobics, Aerobics for Women), the U.S. Air Force Cardiologist who coined the term 'aerobics" (meaning a form of exercise) and has promoted their use for over 25 years, now admits that he was wrong! According to Dr. Cooper, further research has shown that there is no correlation between aerobic endurance performance and health, longevity, or protection against heart disease. He will admit, however, that such activities do carry with them a great risk of injury. Further, he admits that gross-overuse activities such as running are damaging to the body." – Ken Hutchins, SuperSlow Exercise Guild

A simple example of an eccentric contraction is to hold something in your hand with your elbow bent. Slowly allow your elbow to straighten out while holding the weight.  You can visualize your bicep muscle lengthening as you are holding the weight while you are slowly straightening your elbow.  This is an eccentric contraction or eccentric loading of your bicep muscle.


Whether you're allergic to the gym, want to save money or crave convenience, exercising at home is an easy choice to make. What's more difficult is figuring out what to do. How do you set up an effective home workout? What do you do if you don't have much equipment or space? The following series takes you through a variety of choices for exercising at home, whether you have nothing but your own body and a pair of shoes or a workout room tricked out with every piece of equipment imaginable.
If you really want to get in shape, why not turn some everyday tasks into exercise opportunities? We know you're lazy, so between your DVD-guided workout sessions, finding ways to incorporate exercise into daily tasks may help to make exercise less of an intimidating, dark, scary monster that looms ahead. Finding room for exercise in your daily life could even make exercise—dare I say it—fun.
In his new P90 DVD set, the supertrainer Tony Horton drops the "X" for an all-levels-welcome version of his wildly popular 90-day program. The 10 workouts—including total-body and core on the floor routines—are mapped out for you in a follow-along schedule. The modification options to the mix of cardio and resistance moves "make every set possible" for a gymlike intensity, testers said, all in 25 minutes. "It doesn't get much better than that," one reviewer raved.
The effects of exercise training appear to be heterogeneous across non-mammalian species. As examples, exercise training of salmon showed minor improvements of endurance,[155] and a forced swimming regimen of yellowtail amberjack and rainbow trout accelerated their growth rates and altered muscle morphology favorable for sustained swimming.[156][157] Crocodiles, alligators, and ducks showed elevated aerobic capacity following exercise training.[158][159][160] No effect of endurance training was found in most studies of lizards,[158][161] although one study did report a training effect.[162] In lizards, sprint training had no effect on maximal exercise capacity,[162] and muscular damage from over-training occurred following weeks of forced treadmill exercise.[161]
This reformer exercise is an efficient way to work the entire lower body.  Kneel on the reformer and round the back, keeping the arms straight. Use the butt muscles and thighs to push and pull your lower body back and forth. The platform will slide a few inches with each movement. Do five reps. As you get more advanced, do another five reps with the back arched.
Children who participate in physical exercise experience greater loss of body fat and increased cardiovascular fitness.[23] Studies have shown that academic stress in youth increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in later years; however, these risks can be greatly decreased with regular physical exercise.[24] There is a dose-response relation between the amount of exercise performed from approximately 700–2000 kcal of energy expenditure per week and all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality in middle-aged and elderly populations. The greatest potential for reduced mortality is in the sedentary who become moderately active. Studies have shown that since heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, regular exercise in aging women leads to healthier cardiovascular profiles. Most beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular disease mortality can be attained through moderate-intensity activity (40–60% of maximal oxygen uptake, depending on age). Persons who modify their behavior after myocardial infarction to include regular exercise have improved rates of survival. Persons who remain sedentary have the highest risk for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.[25] According to the American Heart Association, exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases, including heart attack and stroke.[22]
Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
The squat is performed by squatting down with a weight held across the upper back under neck and standing up straight again. This is a compound exercise that also involves the glutes (buttocks) and, to a lesser extent, the hamstrings, calves, and the lower back. Lifting belts are sometimes used to help support the lower back. The freeweight squat is one of 'The Big Three' powerlifting exercises, along with the deadlift and the bench press.[2]
One near constant at this age is stiffer joints. Movement of all kinds — which floods joints with oxygenated blood — is helpful. But mobility and flexibility exercises that involve large, controlled ranges of motion in the ankles, hips, shoulders, and upper back can be particularly effective. Try a yoga class, and work mobility into your daily routine as well — anytime and anywhere. Gently stretch however it feels good, and as often as you remember.

While the focus of Pilates is strength training, you'll get some cardio in with moves like this. Stand with your belly pulled in and your arms overhead. Inhale and lower your head, bending the knees and swinging the arms back. Exhale and jump up with straight legs, reaching the arms overhead. Land with the knees slightly bent and return quickly to starting position. Do 8-10 reps at a rapid pace. You should be out of breath when you finish.


Absolute values for KE MVC torques and maximal EMG RMS are presented Table 3. As EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 60 deg/s pre-exercise values significantly differ between sessions, these data were not analyzed. Planned comparisons to explore main effect of time are presented Table 3. Despite a significant main effect of time for the EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 140 deg/s, planned comparison failed to demonstrate a significant difference between times. Changes in KE MVC torque and KE EMG RMS related to baseline are presented Figs 6 and 7. Isometric KF MVC torque did not change over time (75 ± 31 to 73 ± 27 N·m, P = 0.368).
Celebrity fitness instructor Tracy Anderson (clients include Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Jennifer Lopez) offers six 10-minute, total-body dance workouts in this DVD. The first lesson covers basic steps, while the other workouts have titles like "Cardio Party" and "Sweat Fest." Don't worry if you have two left feet: Even novice dancers can master these moves.

Seven minutes of exercise per day a few times a week though isn’t a magical elixir that will give you a bikini-ready body in a few weeks. Michelle Golla, of Denver-based Boost 180 Fitness, says, “it's important not to set unrealistic expectations for a 7-minute workout. It will not completely transform your body, but it is a great way to get your heart pumping and burn calories all day long when you're pressed for time.”  

This is an extremely high-skill movement, and is one of two Olympic Weightlifting events. HOW TO DO IT: Start with the bar on the ground with your feet hip-width apart. With your hands wide on the bar, keep a big chest as you deadlift the weight off the ground (similar to the beginning of the clean). Pull from the floor with your arms in a locked position. Then, drive your hips and pull the bar as high as possible. As you receive the bar overhead, drop down as quickly as possible and lock your arms into place in a squat position with the bar overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, traps, core, shoulders and back.


What if we told you that you could get a kick-ass cardio workout that would keep you on your toes, without even leaving the house? Better still: The steps are broken down into beginner, intermediate, and advanced levels, so you can adjust as needed. And the bodyweight-only moves are mostly low impact, meaning you can do them in the comfort of your own living room without worrying about annoying the downstairs neighbors.
5.  Even when you can't complete another repetition, keep trying to complete this "impossible rep". Even though you aren't moving, metabolic work is being done, and a more thorough "inroad" to muscular failure is accomplished. "Pushing to failure" signals the body to upgrade its capabilities ("adaptive response")... something it will not do unless given a good reason to.
×