The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology has published "The Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness & Lifestyle Approach", which details fitness assessment protocols. One such protocol, the mCAFT, is designed to give information about the aerobic fitness of a person, while using minimal equipment. The subject works by lifting its own body weight up and down double steps (40.6 cm in height total) while listening to set cadences from a compact disc. The end-stage of the age and gender specific stepping rate requires 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. The heart rate increases approximately in a linear fashion from 50% to 100% of maximal oxygen intake. The heart rate does not decrease significantly during the first fifteen seconds of recovery. Thus, one can predict an aerobic fitness using the heart rate right after exercise of a known sub-maximal rate of working.

I read "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol" back in 2000. Then relatively new to learning about exercise and bodybuilding I found it to be a truly fascinating and very challenging read. Not only was the material challenging in the intellectual sense but also in a philosophical sense. It was turning much of what I believed about "exercise" upside down. So meatheads and gym-rats be warned, "Superslow" is a highly technical book that the typical bodybuilder or exercise enthusiast would find "boring" (see other reviews here on Amazon) because it isn't full of ridiculous promises about gigantic, ripped muscles and marketing jargon for selling supplements. What it is is a very thorough analysis of the variety of benefits one can derive (regardless of their limited genetics) from properly performed exercise and the many proven pitfalls associated with a low-intensity and high workload/volume. The book also provides an in-depth history lesson on the continually evolving refinements to Arthur Jones' Nautilus principles. Hutchins' dogged determination to continually seek a safer and more effective way for people to exercise is admirable and shows his devotion to sound scientific principles.
Although exercise testing is useful in the diagnosis and management of cardiovascular and pulmonary diseases, a rapid comprehensive method for measurement of ventilation and gas exchange has been limited to expensive complex computer-based systems. We devised a relatively inexpensive, technically simple, and clinically oriented exercise system built around a desktop calculator. This system ... [Show full abstract]Read more
10.  Work the whole body during one session. Exercising different muscle groups on different days is counterproductive. Your whole workout should take no longer than 45 minutes, and this includes time spent on a treadmill to move lymph fluid to prevent lactic acid pooling in muscles. (Forty-five minutes, once a week for a high level of fitness... who can't find time for that!)
I personally admit to having roller-coaster exercise habits myself. I’ll be a gym rat for three months, followed by four months of sloth and busy-ness. A few years ago, I finally realized how crappy I felt when I hadn’t exercised, and I resolved to find some way to ensure I was at least getting some exercise every day -- even when I couldn’t make it to the gym.

In fig 3A–D, absolute hormone concentrations are presented for the NFO and the OTS groups. Visual inspection of the data led to the conclusion that resting concentrations cortisol, ACTH and PRLwere higher for OTS patients comparedwithNFO. However, reactions to exercise tests did not differ between the groups. Resting hormone concentrations were tested with independent t tests. Only for ACTH, the t test gave a value >2 (ie, t8=2.6; p<0.05), meaning that only for ACTH, the difference between the groups was more than twice as large as the SE. Sensitivity of resting cortisol, ACTH and PRL was four out of five (cutoff 175 μg l−1), four out of five (cutoff 40 ng l−1) and two out of five (cutoff 50 IU l−1), respectively (table 2). Sensitivity for detection of NFO was three out of five, four out of five and three out of five respectively for cortisol, ACTH and PRL, respectively (table 2).
The symptoms associated with OTS, such as changes in emotional behaviour, prolonged feelings of fatigue, sleep disturbances and hormonal dysfunctions are indicative of changes in the regulation and coordinative function of the hypothalamus.8 19 Previous studies have shown different results for stress-induced hormonal responses.6 20 21 Results from a previous study10 and the present study show that contradictory findings cannot solely be explained by different measurement methods and/or definitions used. From figs 3 and 4, it is clear that hormonal responses to one single exercise bout are not sensitive enough to distinguish NFO from OTS.
Most gyms assault their members with a cacophony of distractions – thumping music, blaring televisions, and grunting patrons. We are careful to maintain a clean and distraction-free facility. There is no music and there are no mirrors or televisions. The temperature is kept at 68 degrees. The sessions are one-on-one with a focus on privacy. Instructors are dressed professionally at all times and closely monitor and record every aspect of their client's performance.
Pharmacologic beta-adrenergic blockade reduces maximal heart rate (HR) during exercise but variable results have been reported for minute ventilation (VE), CO2 output (VCO2), and O2 uptake (VO2). A total group of 19 subjects with mild asthma was studied. We studied 16 subjects from the group who received placebo or pindolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, during 1-min incremental exercise on a ... [Show full abstract]Read more
In his homeland of Denmark, Müller was a controversial figure. Some conceived his liberal philosophy and promotion of exposing the entire body to the sun to be anti-Lutheran and even pornography. During the last few years of his life, Müller returned to Denmark and vigorously promoted a natural ‘healing spring’, causing further resentment for being perceived as over-spiritual. After Müller’s death in 1938, a memorial bronze statue was erected by the Danish Government, however, he is since mostly forgotten by the general public (Figures 2–4).18 Larsen J. [Internet]. J.P. Muller, a Danish sportsman, world famous – and forgotten. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.learntomuller.com/j-p-muller-a-danish-sportsman-world-famous-and-forgotten/. [Google Scholar]
Begin this starter sit-up with your legs straight in front of you. Extend your arms over your legs and lower your head between your arms. Curl backward, bending your knees, and stop halfway down. Raise your arms straight up and pull your abs in tightly. Exhale and lower your arms as you curl back up. Do 6-8 reps at a moderate pace. As you become more advanced, try lowering all the way to the floor.
Seven minutes of exercise per day a few times a week though isn’t a magical elixir that will give you a bikini-ready body in a few weeks. Michelle Golla, of Denver-based Boost 180 Fitness, says, “it's important not to set unrealistic expectations for a 7-minute workout. It will not completely transform your body, but it is a great way to get your heart pumping and burn calories all day long when you're pressed for time.”  

Figure 7 Saw. Randell, reproduced with kind permission of Wellcome Library26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar] and Morris, reproduced with kind permission of Elsevier.33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar]
The good-morning is a weight training exercise in which a barbell, two dumbbells, or no weight at all is held on the shoulders, behind the head. The person bends forward and bows at the hips and recovers to upright. The good-morning is so called because the movement resembles bowing to greet someone. It involves the hamstrings but is primarily used to strengthen the lower back; the degree of knee bend used will change the focus – nearly straight-legged involving the hamstrings most.
Preliminary evidence from a 2012 review indicated that physical training for up to four months may increase sleep quality in adults over 40 years of age.[78] A 2010 review suggested that exercise generally improved sleep for most people, and may help with insomnia, but there is insufficient evidence to draw detailed conclusions about the relationship between exercise and sleep.[79]
Multiple component community-wide campaigns are frequently used in an attempt to increase a population's level of physical activity. A 2015 Cochrane review, however, did not find evidence supporting a benefit.[122] The quality of the underlying evidence was also poor.[122] However, there is some evidence that school-based interventions can increase activity levels and fitness in children.[15] Another Cochrane review found some evidence that certain types of exercise programmes, such as those involving gait, balance, co-ordination and functional tasks, can improve balance in older adults.[123] Following progressive resistance training, older adults also respond with improved physical function.[124] Survey of brief interventions promoting physical activity found that they are cost-effective, although there are variations between studies.[125]
Bonds H. The politics of the male body in global sport - the Danish involvement. Oxon: Routledge; 2010.  He regularly exposed his physique publicly and famously demonstrated his exercises and outdoor activities wearing a loincloth, including skiing St Moritz.17 Wildman S. Kafka's Calisthenics. Slate [Internet]. 2011 Jan 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/fitness/2011/01/kafkas_calisthenics.html. [Google Scholar] He stated:15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar]
Stability moves train your core to stay strong and steady. They also target your transverse abdominis, the deep ab muscle that does a 360 around your waist and draws it in, says Brent Brookbush, president of the Brookbush Institute of Human Movement Science in New York City. Try this stabilizer: Hold a dumbbell in your right hand and balance on your left leg. Squat on your left leg as you lower the weight toward your left foot. (More moves to try: grab a Bosu ball and challenge your core with this stability workout. Or you can snag one of these balance boards to work on your core as you watch your favorite TV show.)
Ever notice how dancers have killer abs, despite never hitting the floor for crunches? There’s a reason for that — every move a dancer makes engages their abs. This quick workout with Heather Graham of BeFit walks you through the moves you need to shake your body like a dancer while getting an effective core workout, not to mention your fair share of cardio. This is a low-impact routine perfect for those just getting back into exercise.
One of the main reasons I don't do Pilates very often is that, for me, it gets too boring after a while. Enter this DVD. Made up of five 10-minute workouts, it kept me engaged because I was able to change up the routine often, or, if I only had a few minutes available, I could still squeeze in a workout with just one of the programs. I just might be a Pilates convert after all.
Few interventions exist whereby patients can hope to achieve improvements in both psychiatric symptoms and physical health simultaneously without significant risks of adverse effects. Physical activity offers substantial promise for improving outcomes for people living with mental illness, and the inclusion of physical activity and exercise programs within treatment facilities is warranted given the results of this review.
The main aim of this study was to test the reliability of a novel OLDE protocol performed at high intensity (workload fixed at 85% peak power output [22]). Isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery up to 40 s post exercise were also measured. Subjects visited the laboratory on four different days. During the first visit, subjects were familiarized with the OLDE protocol (see One Leg Dynamic Exercise for more details), and performed after 30 min recovery an incremental test to measure peak power output. After 30 min recovery following the incremental test, subjects were familiarized with neuromuscular testing (see Neuromuscular Function Tests for more details) and the time to exhaustion test. As suggested by Andersen et al. [10], torque and electromyographic (EMG) feedback were used to ensure a quick and reliable familiarization to the novel OLDE protocol. Each of the following three visits (reliability sessions) consisted of completion of the time to exhaustion test with neuromuscular testing pre and post-exercise. An overview of these three sessions can be seen in Fig 1.
This DVD is focused on strength training — you can choose whether you want to do an upper body workout, a lower body workout, an abs and back routine, or a quickie 10-minute total body workout. But don't think you have to already be super buff to jump in: This workout is designed for people of any fitness level — though you will need some equipment for it, like a stretch band and exercise ball.
The relation between the increase in oxygen uptake (VO2) and increase in work rate (WR) between unloaded pedaling and maximal work during incremental cycle ergometer exercise was studied in normal men, men with uncomplicated systemic hypertension and ambulatory men with various cardiovascular diseases. The postulation was that impaired peripheral oxygen delivery would reduce the ratio of the ... [Show full abstract]Read more
By 1925, Margaret Morris had already integrated remedial exercises within her newly established dance school, Margaret Morris Movement (MMM). Her philosophy claimed that natural dance moves should be healthy and constructive for the body and mind, rather than the deleterious moves dancers were expected to practice and perform at the time. Morris saw the connections between breathing, stamina, range of motion, posture, health, vitality, and how these freed the body to dance and the mind to be creative.49 Morris M. My life in movement. London: Peter Owen Publishers; 1969. [Google Scholar] This philosophy extended itself to the use of natural dance moves as remedial exercises and a healthy active lifestyle. During 1925 and 1926, Morris presented her method to doctors and midwifes in England, France, and Switzerland, among them the St Thomas team. As a result of this meeting, Morris enrolled to study physiotherapy under Randell and graduated in 1933 with distinction.30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar] Throughout her decade of collaboration with Randell and the St Thomas Project, Morris continued to educate and run MMM with great appreciation from top-tier dancers, students, and artistic critiques. By 1939, her teachers developed movement education and dance centers in 10 countries, most still active today (Figures 7–9).30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar]

Matt Sauerhoff, owner of The LIV Method says one of his favorite, fastest and easiest to do on the go moves is the wall squat. “Start with your back against the wall and your heels about a foot off the wall. Bend your knees and slide down the wall until your legs create a 90-degree angle,” he says. “Make sure your knees are aligned over your toes/laces. Press heels into the floor and focus on contracting your abs, pressing lower back into the wall so it’s flat. Hold for 30 seconds.” Combine it with these 30 Fat-Burning Foods and you’ll be melting the fat in no time!


Because CFS/ME is often related to viral issues or co-infections in the body, the immune system is "working overtime". CFS can actually be more debilitating than fibromyalgia, depending on the pain levels within fibro on any given day. This is simply due to the complex nature of CFS within the immune system. In fact, my preferred reference to this illness is not CFS but rather CFIDS or ME (Chronic Fatigue Immune Deficiency Syndrome OR Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)
Twelve normal men performed 1-min incremental exercise tests to exhaustion in approximately 10 min on both treadmill and cycle ergometer. The maximal O2 uptake (VO2 max) and anaerobic threshold (AT) were higher (6 and 13%, respectively) on the treadmill than the cycle; the AT was reached at about 50% of VO2 max on both ergometers. Maximal CO2 output, heart rate, and O2 pulse were also slightly, but significantly higher on the treadmill. Maximal ventilation, gas exchange ratio, and ventilatory equivalents for O2 and CO2 for both forms of exercise were not significantly different. To determine the optimum exercise test for both treadmill and cycle, we exercised five of the subjects at various work rate increments on both ergometers in a randomized design. The treadmill increments were 0.8, 1.7, 2.5, and 4.2%/min at a constant speed of 3.4 mph, and 1.7 and 4.2%/min at 4.5 mph. Cycle increments were 15, 30, and 60 W/min. The VO2 max was significantly higher on tests where the increment magnitude was large enough to induce test durations of 8-17 min, but the AT was independent of test duration. Thus, for evaluating cardiopulmonary function with incremental exercise testing by either treadmill or cycle, we suggest selecting a work rate increment to bring the subject to the limit of his tolerance in about 10 min.

Exercise tests were performed on a cycle ergometer (Lode Excalibur Sport, Groningen, The Netherlands) or on a treadmill (Ergo ELG 55; Woodway, Weil am Rhein, Germany) depending on the sport. Tests on the cycle ergometer started with an initial workload of 80 W (subjects 6 and 7) or 30 W (subjects 4 and 9), the workload was increased by 40 W every 3 min. Tests on the treadmill started at 5.4 km h−1, the speed was increased with 1.8 km h−1 each 3 min (subjects 1, 2, 3, 8 and 10). One subject performed the treadmill test with an inclination of 1% (subject 5). The duration of each test was recorded in seconds. Subjects wore a heart rate monitor (Polar Accurex Plus, Kempele, Finland) for determination of maximal heart rate (HRmax) throughout the exercise tests. After each exercise test, 20 μl of blood was drawn from the right earlobe to determine maximal blood lactate concentration ([La]max) with enzymatic analysis (EKF; Biosen 5030, Barleben, Germany).
The deadlift is one of the foundational strength movements in any exercise program. HOW TO DO IT: The deadlift begins with the bar on the ground. You can perform this with a regular grip or an alternating grip, which means one hand facing towards your body and one hand facing away. With a proud chest and locked core, pull the bar up while keeping it as close to your body as possible. Use your hip hinge and push your knees back to keep your body over the bar. Then extend the hips and squeeze the glutes to complete the move. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, back and core.

In fig 3A–D, absolute hormone concentrations are presented for the NFO and the OTS groups. Visual inspection of the data led to the conclusion that resting concentrations cortisol, ACTH and PRLwere higher for OTS patients comparedwithNFO. However, reactions to exercise tests did not differ between the groups. Resting hormone concentrations were tested with independent t tests. Only for ACTH, the t test gave a value >2 (ie, t8=2.6; p<0.05), meaning that only for ACTH, the difference between the groups was more than twice as large as the SE. Sensitivity of resting cortisol, ACTH and PRL was four out of five (cutoff 175 μg l−1), four out of five (cutoff 40 ng l−1) and two out of five (cutoff 50 IU l−1), respectively (table 2). Sensitivity for detection of NFO was three out of five, four out of five and three out of five respectively for cortisol, ACTH and PRL, respectively (table 2).
The bent-over row is performed while leaning over, holding a weight hanging down in one hand or both hands, by pulling it up towards the abdomen. This is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. The torso is unsupported in some variants of this exercise, in which case lifting belts are often used to help support the lower back.

The symptoms associated with OTS, such as changes in emotional behaviour, prolonged feelings of fatigue, sleep disturbances and hormonal dysfunctions are indicative of changes in the regulation and coordinative function of the hypothalamus.8 19 Previous studies have shown different results for stress-induced hormonal responses.6 20 21 Results from a previous study10 and the present study show that contradictory findings cannot solely be explained by different measurement methods and/or definitions used. From figs 3 and 4, it is clear that hormonal responses to one single exercise bout are not sensitive enough to distinguish NFO from OTS.


As a "formerly advanced" climber who is trying to get back into a healthy regimen after a year or two off, this book was excellent review of some obvious components of active practice that I'd forgotten in my rush to get back to my old level of climbing. Horst continues to be the best when it comes to training guides. Cannot recommend this book (or any of the others) enough.


In London, the Medical Officer of Thorpe Coombe maternity hospital approved and implemented the St Thomas method in 1940, presented as ‘Training for Childbirth - and After.’26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar] There was also interest from the USA, but this option did not materialize.29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar]
Major variants: reverse ~ (curling the pelvis towards the shoulders), twisting ~ or side ~ (lifting one shoulder at a time; emphasis is on the obliques), cable ~ (pulling down on a cable machine while kneeling), sit-up ~ (have [chest] touch your knees), vertical crunch (propping up to dangle legs and pulling knees to the [ chest] or keeping legs straight and pulling up legs to a 90 degree position). Reverse hanging crunch (using gravity boots or slings to hang head down and pulling to a 90 or 180 degree form)
5.  Even when you can't complete another repetition, keep trying to complete this "impossible rep". Even though you aren't moving, metabolic work is being done, and a more thorough "inroad" to muscular failure is accomplished. "Pushing to failure" signals the body to upgrade its capabilities ("adaptive response")... something it will not do unless given a good reason to.
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