You’ll begin the program with a full-body training split, meaning you’ll train all major bodyparts in each workout (as opposed to “splitting up” your training). Train three days this first week, performing just one exercise per bodypart in each session. It’s important that you have a day of rest between each workout to allow your body to recover; this makes training Monday, Wednesday and Friday—with Saturday and Sunday being rest days—a good approach.

Shapiro recommends elevated quadrupled shoulder adduction for a total body workout. “Start on the floor on all fours with your knees on the ground shoulder width apart and hands on the ground shoulder width apart. Make sure your knees are in line with your hips and wrists in-line with your shoulders. Tuck your toes towards your body and straighten out your back to have a neutral posture,” he explains. “Here’s the fun part: now lift your knees off the ground just two to four inches. You should feel your arms, shoulders, core, quads, and legs shaking.” And for the finale? Utilize the back—begin by pushing your upper back to the sky, separating your shoulder blades. Immediately push your chest down to pinch your shoulder blades together to target the upper back muscle groups that include the rhomboids and lower traps.
The Instructor – This is one of the most important factors of your exercise video. If you don’t like the instructor, it will eventually irritate you enough to stop using it. Look for instructors that motivate you to work harder and push harder not work to end the video so you don’t have to listen to them anymore. It’s a plus for the instructor to actually have a fitness background of some kind, which is both for your safety and to give you the knowledge that the video has legitimate foundations in real fitness rather than just being something they did on a whim or for celebrity endorsement.

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
×