Use your toilet time wisely. Take advantage of that toilet time by doing some kegels. Kegels are the muscles used to stop the flow of urination, so practice clenching those muscles the next time you're doing your business. Both men and women can do kegels, which will not only help guard against incontinence, but may also improve bedroom endurance, if you catch my drift.
Rock climbing is one of the most physically challenging sports, testing strength, endurance, flexibility, and stamina. To improve in the sport, climbers must build and maintain each of these assets. Written by veteran climber and performance coach, Eric Hörst, The Rock Climber's Exercise Guide provides climbers of all ages and experience with the knowledge and tools to design and follow a comprehensive, personalized exercise program. Enhance your skills, maximize your potential, and become the best climber you can be!
Super setting means pairing two exercises and doing them back-to-back, explains Lefkowith. There are a few ways to do these: You could save time by working two different muscle groups (like arms and legs) so you don’t need to rest in between exercises, because one muscle group is recovering while the other is working. Or, you could do two exercises that work the same area to completely fatigue one muscle group. Another option is to pair “push” and “pull” movements—for example, a push-up and a pull-up. “Super sets can be helpful if you are short on time and still want to focus on building strength,” explains says Lefkowith. And because you’re doing movements paired together, you’re likely to raise your heart rate, too.
After 5 min warm up at 20% of peak power output, subjects performed a time to exhaustion at 85% of peak power output. Exhaustion was defined as a decrease in cadence below 40 cpm for a duration ≥ 10 s or when the subject voluntarily stopped. Subjects were not aware of the time elapsed during the time to exhaustion test. Verbal encouragements were provided by an experimenter naïve of time to exhaustion during the previous sessions.
Founder Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow has been 'managed' by unscrupulous business partners, into a commercial entity bearing little resemblance to his original intention, (& no involvement with Mr Hutchins himself, nor any of his original associates). The -real- SS was revolutionary for its time, but Hutchins' new textbook, "The Renaissance of Exercise, a Vitruvian Adventure", is the result of his ongoing refinements over the past 18 years. Rather than pay over a $150 for the supposed historic value of a slim, soft-cover, dog-eared $10 book & it's relatively primitive ideas, get the new hard-cover textbook./It seems that one of the main criticisms os The Manual is "too much information". True, for a casual reader.The fact is, ANY exercise protocol is simple enough to write up on one or two pages: How many sets. How many reps. How many exercises. How often. About 10 exercise technique descriptions: Done. It's the precise whys, hows, & special cases that take a book to fulfill.
Use your toilet time wisely. Take advantage of that toilet time by doing some kegels. Kegels are the muscles used to stop the flow of urination, so practice clenching those muscles the next time you're doing your business. Both men and women can do kegels, which will not only help guard against incontinence, but may also improve bedroom endurance, if you catch my drift.

Hessel J [Internet]. Joseph H. Pilates biography. 2015 Jul 8 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.jillianhessel.com/pilates_biography.html.  He claimed that ‘sports are wonderful … but of little value for correcting whats wrong with you … corrective exercise is the only way to build a beautiful, strong, youthful body.’44 Readers Digest [Internet]. Ray MB. Cutting a fine figure (1934). 2012 Dec 13 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.isofit.com.hk/assets/files/193410_Readers_Digest_Joe_Pilates_Interview.pdf. [Google Scholar] He explained in his 1939 book ‘Your Health’: ‘Practically all human ailments are directly traceable to wrong habits which can only be corrected through the immediate adoption of right (natural, normal) habits’ … ‘the present day efforts of our so-called health departments are in vain so far as physical health is concerned’ … ‘this condition will prevail until such time as marks the recognition of a standard formation of sound and sane physical culture, based upon the natural laws of life.’45 Pilates J. Your health. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1934. [Google Scholar] In his 1945 book ‘Return to Life Through Contrology,’ Pilates clearly supported Checkley, Müller, and Alexander stating that ‘Contrology is not a system of haphazard exercises designed to produce only bulging muscles’ … ‘Rather, it was conceived to limber and stretch muscles and ligaments so that your body will be as supple as that of a cat and not muscular like the body of a brewery-truck horse.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar] In this book, Pilates presented a list of 34 full-body equipment-free exercises, which if performed regularly at home, were promised to ‘give you suppleness, natural grace, and skill that will be unmistakably reflected in the way you walk, in the way you play, and in the way you work’ … ‘You will find your body development approaching the ideal, accompanied by renewed mental vigor and spiritual enhancement’. Pilates famously stated: ‘Physical fitness is the first requisite of happiness.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar] As with Müller,15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Randell,25,26 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949.
One of the main reasons I don't do Pilates very often is that, for me, it gets too boring after a while. Enter this DVD. Made up of five 10-minute workouts, it kept me engaged because I was able to change up the routine often, or, if I only had a few minutes available, I could still squeeze in a workout with just one of the programs. I just might be a Pilates convert after all.

Weighing yourself and keeping an exercise journal are two ways to track your progress, but taking your measurements (chest, arms, waist, hips) will give you a little more information. For example, you may be losing inches even if your scale weight doesn't change. In that case, monitoring your measurements every few weeks can reassure you that you are, in fact, slimming down.


Drop Sets. Drop sets can be performed with any exercise that involves moving weight around, like squats or the bench press. You have performed ten bench presses and couldn't possibly do eleven. Re-rack the weight and have a partner take off ten pounds or so, then perform as many reps as possible at that new weight. It's even easier to use dumbbells and simply move to smaller and smaller bells, set to set. Three total drop sets is the norm, do this to infinity and beyond and you may be way too sore the next day.
Anaerobic exercise, which includes strength and resistance training, can firm, strengthen, and tone muscles, as well as improve bone strength, balance, and coordination.[3] Examples of strength moves are push-ups, pull-ups, lunges, and bicep curls using dumbbells.[3] Anaerobic exercise also include weight training, functional training, eccentric training, interval training, sprinting, and high-intensity interval training increase short-term muscle strength.[3][5]
On the other hand, your anaerobic energy system is taxed when you do high-intensity workouts that skyrocket your heart rate. “Anaerobic activities are short intervals of work used to improve speed and power,” explains Lefkowith. During these activities, your muscles break down glucose (aka sugar) to use as energy (because oxygen can’t deliver energy to your muscles fast enough).
In parallel, Prussian nationalist and exercise instructor Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778–1852) advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Jahn invented the standard equipment of modern gymnastics; the parallel bars, rings, balance beam, horse, and horizontal bar4 Bakewell S. Illustrations from the Wellcome Institute Library: Medical gymnastics and the Cyriax collection. Med Hist. 1997;41:487–95.10.1017/S0025727300063067[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] and in 1811, founded the Physical Culture Movement in Germany.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Ling and Jahn’s Physical Culture gained following and flourished in gymnasiums throughout Europe and later in the United States of America until the end of the 19th century. However, toward the end of the century, the original concept of harmonious interaction between the competitive and holistic exercise systems eroded and deteriorated. This was due to the late 19th century shift in the gymnasium environment toward harsh paramilitary style training.9–11 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890.
Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.  Pilates swiftly gained prominence with dancers and celebrities, which led to his notoriety as a New York City exercise personality. In 1932, Pilates taught Contrology exercises at the mythological Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival as he did every summer until 1951.42,43 Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.
To qualify for inclusion, studies had to be level 1 or level 2 (randomized controlled trials); had to compare rehabilitation interventions, such as exercise or manual therapy, with other treatments or placebo; had to include validated outcome measures of pain, function, or disability; and had to be limited to individuals with diagnosed impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome was determined by a positive impingement sign per Neer or Hawkins criteria, or both. Articles were excluded if they addressed other shoulder conditions (eg, calcific tendinosis, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, adhesive capsulitis, osteoarthritis), addressed postoperative management, were retrospective studies or case series, or used other outcome measures.
Interestingly, one of our subjects presented both a CV and a time to exhaustion greater than the other subjects. As both CV and time to exhaustion are known to increase when the intensity of the exercise decreases [20], it is likely that this subject did not reach its true peak power output during the incremental test, and then performed the three time to exhaustion tests at an intensity below 85% of peak power output. This result is of particular importance for future research aiming to manipulate endurance performance using this protocol. Indeed, when the true peak power output is not reached during the incremental test, due to an increase in variability, it might be harder to detect significant changes in muscle endurance. Therefore, in order to better understand the variability in reaching the true peak power output of subjects, further studies should investigate the reliability of the incremental test used in the present study.
Inappropriate exercise can do more harm than good, with the definition of “inappropriate” varying according to the individual. For many activities, especially running and cycling, there are significant injuries that occur with poorly regimented exercise schedules. Injuries from accidents also remain a major concern,[85] whereas the effects of increased exposure to air pollution seem only a minor concern.[86][87]
Jump up ^ Tarumi T, Zhang R (January 2014). "Cerebral hemodynamics of the aging brain: risk of Alzheimer disease and benefit of aerobic exercise". Front Physiol. 5: 6. doi:10.3389/fphys.2014.00006. PMC 3896879. PMID 24478719. Exercise-related improvements in brain function and structure may be conferred by the concurrent adaptations in vascular function and structure. Aerobic exercise increases the peripheral levels of growth factors (e.g., BDNF, IFG-1, and VEGF) which cross the blood-brain barrier (BBB) and stimulate neurogenesis and angiogenesis (Trejo et al., 2001; Lee et al., 2002; Fabel et al., 2003; Lopez-Lopez et al., 2004). Consistent with this, exercise-related enlargement of hippocampus was accompanied by increases in cerebral blood volume and capillary densities (Pereira et al., 2007). Enhanced cerebral perfusion may not only facilitate the delivery of energy substrates, but also lower the risk of vascular-related brain damages, including WMH and silent infarct (Tseng et al., 2013). Furthermore, regular aerobic exercise is associated with lower levels of Aβ deposition in individuals with APOE4 positive (Head et al., 2012), which may also reduce the risk of cerebral amyloid angiopathy and microbleeds (Poels et al., 2010).
^ Jump up to: a b Szuhany KL, Bugatti M, Otto MW (October 2014). "A meta-analytic review of the effects of exercise on brain-derived neurotrophic factor". J Psychiatr Res. 60C: 56–64. doi:10.1016/j.jpsychires.2014.10.003. PMC 4314337. PMID 25455510. Consistent evidence indicates that exercise improves cognition and mood, with preliminary evidence suggesting that brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) may mediate these effects. The aim of the current meta-analysis was to provide an estimate of the strength of the association between exercise and increased BDNF levels in humans across multiple exercise paradigms. We conducted a meta-analysis of 29 studies (N = 1111 participants) examining the effect of exercise on BDNF levels in three exercise paradigms: (1) a single session of exercise, (2) a session of exercise following a program of regular exercise, and (3) resting BDNF levels following a program of regular exercise. Moderators of this effect were also examined. Results demonstrated a moderate effect size for increases in BDNF following a single session of exercise (Hedges' g = 0.46, p < 0.001). Further, regular exercise intensified the effect of a session of exercise on BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.59, p = 0.02). Finally, results indicated a small effect of regular exercise on resting BDNF levels (Hedges' g = 0.27, p = 0.005). ... Effect size analysis supports the role of exercise as a strategy for enhancing BDNF activity in humans.

It’s like preparing for the birth marathon, or any marathon for that matter. The more you can prepare your body for what it’s about to experience, the better you feel and the better your body responds. Implementation of our foundational techniques is a perfect way to set up for a successful pregnancy and postpartum phase. We want to keep you doing what you love to do, so no need to rush and cancel your memberships at other studios. You can incorporate our “basics of Bloom” into any workout you desire. Through this, you’ll not only be setting up your body for a more comfortable pregnancy but you’ll also be able to amp up your current workout for more efficiency and better results.

DOMS stands for delayed onset muscle soreness, which is the soreness you feel the day or two after a hard workout. This happens because when you’re working out you’re damaging muscle fibers (that’s a good thing!). The muscle then repairs and rebuilds and that’s how you get stronger. The soreness and pain you feel from DOMS comes from the chemicals that set off pain receptors during the repair process, Robert Hyldahl, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist at Brigham Young University, previously explained to SELF. This soreness may last anywhere from 24 to 72 hours after your workout. (Here’s what to do when DOMS kicks in after a workout.)
6.  If an exercise can be done for more than 90 seconds, increase the resistance so that momentary muscular failure occurs within 45 - 90 seconds (this is considered "high-intensity" exercise). If you can do sit-ups for ten minutes, the intensity is insufficient to cross that threshold mentioned above, and you're just wasting valuable physiological resources. If you can't do even one rep, reduce the resistance (i.e. if doing a push-up, change from being on your toes to on your knees, or start from the top and slowly lower yourself; if using a machine, choose a lower setting; if using free-weights, pick a lower weight; if doing a chin-up, use a chair to boost yourself up to the top, then take your feet off the chair and slowly lower yourself).
I saw the commercial for this program a few years ago on TV and laughed when it came on. I thought it was just another one of those infomercials that advertised something unattainable and absolutely ridiculous. Who could possibly get ripped by working out in their living room for an hour a day? Well, let's fast forward 3 years later to 2011 and I certainly wasn't laughing anymore. During my college years I managed to pack on 50 pounds of extra weight that needed to come off. So, I went on a diet and started working out at the local gym. Well, that whole gym thing didn't last long. Between gas prices and the membership cost, I just wasn't feeling it. While venting to one of my friends, he suggested that I do P90x. Needless to say he received an eyebrow raise from me. Fast forward another 2 weeks later ... full review
SOURCES: Liz Neporent, video creator; president, Wellness 360 corporate wellness consulting firm, New York. Wendy Glenna, American Council on Exercise-certified fitness instructor; physical education teacher; fitness video reviewer, Collage Video, Minneapolis, Minn. Paula Zurowski, ACE-certified personal trainer; fitness video reviewer, Richmond, Calif.
2. The "For Dummies" series. Any of the "Dummies" series videos (like Shaping up with Weights for Dummies, Pilates for Weight Loss for Dummies and Basic Yoga for Dummies) are usually excellent, says Zurowski. These videos go slowly, explain the workout clearly, and show the exercise from multiple angles. The instructor is always alone, so there are no distractions. Another good feature of this series is that it also shows mistakes to avoid, says Glenna.
This is an extremely high-skill movement, and is one of two Olympic Weightlifting events. HOW TO DO IT: Start with the bar on the ground with your feet hip-width apart. With your hands wide on the bar, keep a big chest as you deadlift the weight off the ground (similar to the beginning of the clean). Pull from the floor with your arms in a locked position. Then, drive your hips and pull the bar as high as possible. As you receive the bar overhead, drop down as quickly as possible and lock your arms into place in a squat position with the bar overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, traps, core, shoulders and back.
Aerobic exercise, which speeds up your heart rate and breathing, is important for many body functions. It gives your heart and lungs a workout and increases endurance. "If you're too winded to walk up a flight of stairs, that's a good indicator that you need more aerobic exercise to help condition your heart and lungs, and get enough blood to your muscles to help them work efficiently," says Wilson.

Now that the holidays are creeping around the corner, you may have to break up with your regularly scheduled sweat sessions, at least temporarily. And though the most wonderful time of the year may interfere with your fave spin class or butt-kicking bootcamp routine, it’s completely possible to stay fit—all you need is an Internet connection and a little living room space. (OK, and maybe a few props here and there.) And it’s all thanks to these seriously excellent, totally free workout videos. We’ve rounded up the best YouTube workouts—we’re talking everything from traditional aerobics to ballet to high-intensity interval training routines—so you can keep your physique in tip-top shape this season and beyond.


Our results showed that both the MCT and HIIT group performed an equal amount of exercise sessions alone and together with others, suggesting that both individual and group-related exercise intervention strategies may be attractive to older adults. However, women exercised more frequently together with others than men. This result is in line with previous findings that women aged 60–67 years are less likely than men to prefer physical activity that can be done alone [23], and that more women than men express a need for social support to maintain an exercise program [31].
Strength (or “weight”) training exercises build muscle. One’s body naturally grows muscle until the age of 25. As we age, our body progressively loses muscle— unless you make an effort to maintain or build it. Strength is good for everyone, regardless of gender or age and helps in everyday activities. Muscle mass can significantly decrease your chances of obesity, diabetes, cancer, and osteoporosis. Gender does not affect one’s ability to grow muscle, but men can develop more muscle mass than women because men naturally have a higher percentage of lean muscle. Women, you will not turn into the Incredible Hulk by strength training — I say this because many women don’t do strength training out of a fear of getting “big.” I wish it were that easy!
Behind the seemingly uniform acute hormonal response to exercise, explaining the disturbance to the neuroendocrine system caused by OTS is not that simple. There are several similarities with other intensive and chronic stress situations. There is compelling evidence for the involvement of HPA axis abnormalities in chronic stress situations such as post-traumatic stress disorder17 and depression25 and probably also during NFO and OTS. In chronic stress situations, the number of ACTH and cortisol secretion pulses is increased, which is also reflected in elevated urinary cortisol production.25
Zumba Fitness-Concert Live. Ever been to a concert and just danced around with abandon? This Zumba video is the next best thing and it’ll count as a workout! In addition to the cardio burn, you’ll feel all the electricity from the crowd during this 70-minute latin dance workout. The video features 16 high-energy, calorie-blasting routines that you can do all at once, or pause and break up into intervals.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
PiYo isn't like standard Pilates and yoga classes that make you hold long, intense poses, or lead you through dozens of repetitive, microscopic core movements. PiYo speeds everything up—including your results—by introducing you to dynamic, flowing sequences that can burn serious calories at the same time as they lengthen and tone your muscles and increase your flexibility.
Aerobic exercise is any physical activity that uses large muscle groups and causes the body to use more oxygen than it would while resting.[3] The goal of aerobic exercise is to increase cardiovascular endurance.[4] Examples of aerobic exercise include running, cycling, swimming, brisk walking, skipping rope, rowing, hiking, playing tennis, continuous training, and long slow distance training.[3]
If you’re sick of doing endless repetitions of traditional squats, check out this video to challenge your muscles in new ways and spark some creativity. “We asked certified personal trainer and Women’s Health’s Next Fitness Star, Selena Watkins, to pull together 15 dance-inspired versions of this classic booty toner, and the results are giving us a whole new appreciation for an old-school move,” says the magazine. This routine is just a sampler of some of the squat variations you could complete. Pick three or four and incorporate them into your next leg day to spice things up.
Interestingly, one of our subjects presented both a CV and a time to exhaustion greater than the other subjects. As both CV and time to exhaustion are known to increase when the intensity of the exercise decreases [20], it is likely that this subject did not reach its true peak power output during the incremental test, and then performed the three time to exhaustion tests at an intensity below 85% of peak power output. This result is of particular importance for future research aiming to manipulate endurance performance using this protocol. Indeed, when the true peak power output is not reached during the incremental test, due to an increase in variability, it might be harder to detect significant changes in muscle endurance. Therefore, in order to better understand the variability in reaching the true peak power output of subjects, further studies should investigate the reliability of the incremental test used in the present study.
Ten patients who consulted a sports physician with complaints of underperformance and fatigue participated in the present study. The eight men and two women had an average height and weight of 181±(8) cm and 68.4±(11.8) kg. All subjects were diagnosed by a sports physician according to the latest guidelines for overtraining diagnosis.1 18 A careful history including training history was taken, completed by a physical examination and a blood draw to rule out other possible causes for the complaints. Patients were diagnosed as NFO or OTS retrospectively according to the severity of symptoms and the total duration of symptoms and underperformance (ie, both before and after testing) when no medical explanation for the condition could be found. It turned out that a cutoff of 1-year total duration gave a good distinction between NFO and OTS patients. Demographic data and reported symptoms can be found in table 1. Data of subject 1 are the same as presented in an earlier publication.10 All subjects signed informed consent before participation.

Anyone who watched Jackie Warner on Bravo's Work Out knows she takes a tough-love approach to fitness. And, clearly, if you've checked out her abs lately, it works. She shares her signature circuit-training workout in this high-energy DVD that gives the option of four different 15-minute workouts or one 40-minute total body circuit, and left me feeling like I just had an up-close-and-personal training session with the exercise guru.
The goal with exercise is to work WITH our bodies and slowly condition over time. This is not a quick process because creating a “heal-thy” lifestyle takes diligence and consistency. The best way to avoid Post Exercise Malaise is to increase both duration and intensity SLOWLY over time and include adequate rest breaks and recovery time in between workouts.
Here's how to do it with good form. Stand with feet shoulder-width apart, then bend knees and flex forward at the hips. (If you have trouble doing this exercise standing up, support your weight by sitting on an incline bench, facing backward.) Tilt your pelvis slightly forward, engage the abdominals, and extend your upper spine to add support. Hold dumbbells or barbell beneath the shoulders with hands about shoulder-width apart. Flex your elbows, and lift both hands toward the sides of your body. Pause, then slowly lower hands to the starting position. (Beginners should perform the move without weights.)
Let’s just call this the accelerated beginner’s guide to bodybuilding. In this plan, your first month of training will be demanding, but not so demanding as to cause injury (or worse yet, burnout), and progressive in the sense that each week you’ll graduate to different exercises, higher volume, more intensity or all of the above. After four weeks you’ll not only be ready for the next challenge but you’ll have built a significant amount of quality muscle. In other words, one month from now you’ll look significantly better with your shirt off than you look now. (How’s that for results?)
One of the foundational moves of any strength program is the back squat. The back squat is performed with a barbell across the trapezius muscles, feet a little wider than shoulder-width apart, and feet slightly turned out. HOW TO DO IT: Take a big breath to brace the core, then send your buttocks back while keeping your chest big and proud. You should squat below parallel if your mobility allows. As you drive up, think of screwing your feet out and into the ground. This cue will fire the glutes so that you can get the most strength out of the movement. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves and core.
The VE group consisted of 8 women and 12 men (age 69.6 ± 3.9 years; weight 70.7 ± 12.1 kg; height 161.3 ± 6.9 cm). The control group consisted of 6 women and 14 men (age 71.2 ± 3.7 years; weight 76.1 ± 12.3 kg; height 167.5 ± 9.8 cm). Only 20 subjects of the VE group and 8 of the control group correctly completed the trials (see Figure 1 and Limitation of the Study paragraph). Adherence to protocol of the VE group was checked daily by our motor scientist by means of a daily record where he noted the week and participation number, the mean HR of the sessions, the type of exercises, and the number of repetitions per set carried out. During the training period, no adverse events such as dizziness, musculoskeletal pain, or cardiovascular issues were recorded. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in strength, flexibility, balance, and agility tested by SFT. T0-T1 differences are shown in Figures ​Figures22 and ​and3.3. Namely, 5 tests out of 6 showed significant improvement: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4; T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6; T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7; T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm; T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm; T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Conversely, the 8-foot up and go test (T0 6.5 ± 7.6 sec; T1 4.5 ± 0.6 sec, p > 0.05) showed no significant statistical difference due to a high SD in T0 assessment.
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