For Paced Audio Workouts: MotionTraxx (iPhone or iPad) - This music-based app is another great option for home exercisers, particularly if you're a walker or runner. Deekron the Fitness DJ has put together an incredible variety of music mixes, all set at different beats per minute, so you can find the perfect pace for any workout - Walking, running, lifting weights or other activities. There are also coached workouts (these cost extra) available at iTunes.
Former ballet dancer and Ballet Beautiful founder Mary Helen Bowers has serious fitness cred thanks to training Natalie Portman for her role in Black Swan. With this free workout video, she takes her expertise outside the dance studio. The 15-minute mat workout will help tone your lower body with graceful ballet-inspired movements like bridge variations.
To try it, choose a medium-heavy weight (50 percent to 70 percent of your one-rep-max, or 1RM, if you know it). Lift it with as much velocity as you can muster, then lower it with control. For instance, if you are bench pressing, the push up will feel almost as though you are punching the weight up into the ceiling. Once you have completed the lift, slowly lower the weight to your chest. You can apply this technique using a variety of implements, including dumbbells, barbells, weight machines, elastic bands, and body weight, he explains.
In total, 1567 participants (790 women) met the inclusion criteria, fulfilled baseline testing and were randomized 1:1 into an exercise training group or to a control group. The exercise training group was further randomized 1:1 to either MCT or HIIT. Participants in the exercise groups were instructed to fill in exercise logs after each exercise session they performed. Data in the present study is based on the exercise logs from the first year of the intervention. Therefore, only participants in the exercise groups were included in the present study (n = 787). Dropouts in the exercise groups during the first year (n = 123) and those with no exercise logs (n = 46) were excluded. A total of 618 participants (291 women) were included in the analyses (Fig. 1). The study was approved by the Regional Committee for Medical Research Ethics (REK sør-øst B: 2015/945) and all participants gave their written informed consent before participation.

I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.


Recruitment criteria were one or both of sedentariness and dysmetabolism. Thus, we selected subjects who were not physically active or involved in any exercise program; that is, they had a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, before entering the study, they were carefully screened for metabolic problems which attested a dysmetabolic status, as increased levels of plasma glucose, free fatty acids, triglyceride, and urate in fasting state. Both criteria were verified by means of family doctor databases of subjects.
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