One of the main reasons I don't do Pilates very often is that, for me, it gets too boring after a while. Enter this DVD. Made up of five 10-minute workouts, it kept me engaged because I was able to change up the routine often, or, if I only had a few minutes available, I could still squeeze in a workout with just one of the programs. I just might be a Pilates convert after all.
Our objective is to use the information we have gotten and pass it on to you, all in one convenient place so you don’t have to go from site to site trying to find what you’re looking for. We have reviewed three of the top ten workout DVD/video sets that are being purchased by consumers and have detailed what they do, why people like them and what they are saying about them.
Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.
Many of the things we do for fun (and work) count as exercise. Raking the yard counts as physical activity. So does ballroom dancing and playing with your kids or grandkids. As long as you're doing some form of aerobic exercise for at least 30 minutes a day, and you include two days of strength training a week, you can consider yourself an "active" person.
Exercise doesn't have to be done at the gym. You can work out in the comfort of your own home. And with calesthenic-type exercises such as squats, lunges, pushups, and sit-ups, you can use the resistance of your own weight to condition your body. To boost your strength and aerobic capacity, you may also want to invest in some home exercise equipment.
Physical exercise is important for maintaining physical fitness and can contribute to maintaining a healthy weight, regulating digestive health, building and maintaining healthy bone density, muscle strength, and joint mobility, promoting physiological well-being, reducing surgical risks, and strengthening the immune system. Some studies indicate that exercise may increase life expectancy and the overall quality of life.[10] People who participate in moderate to high levels of physical exercise have a lower mortality rate compared to individuals who by comparison are not physically active.[11] Moderate levels of exercise have been correlated with preventing aging by reducing inflammatory potential.[12] The majority of the benefits from exercise are achieved with around 3500 metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes per week.[13] For example, climbing stairs 10 minutes, vacuuming 15 minutes, gardening 20 minutes, running 20 minutes, and walking or bicycling for transportation 25 minutes on a daily basis would together achieve about 3000 MET minutes a week.[13] A lack of physical activity causes approximately 6% of the burden of disease from coronary heart disease, 7% of type 2 diabetes, 10% of breast cancer and 10% of colon cancer worldwide.[14] Overall, physical inactivity causes 9% of premature mortality worldwide.[14]
I love this DVD because it's basically the equivalent of seven DVDs in one — offering seven different 20-minute yoga practices to mix and match. I liked the freedom of being able to do a different one each day or combine two when I wanted to do a longer session. The flows range from slow-paced for relaxation to more intense for an energizing practice.
You may commit to crunches and planks, Pilates and yoga, all in an effort to target your abs, which they do, but don't stop there. Broaden your "rep"ertoire to include some of these other types of moves and methods (some of which you can do at your desk), and suddenly your core is being challenged with every motion—even though your mind is never on your middle. (Just don't forget abs are made in the kitchen too. Steer clear of these foods to prevent bloating.)
How to: Stand with your feet shoulder-width apart, bend your knees, and bend forward at the hips. Engage your abs without hunching your back. Hold weights beneath your shoulders, keeping your hands shoulder-width apart. Bend your elbows and lift both hands toward the sides of your body. Pause, then slowly lower your hands to the starting position. Can perform with a bar or dumbbells.
Trainer Natalie Uhling is all about the tried and true burpee for full body conditioning in 30 seconds—though she recommends three sets of 30-second burpees with a 15-second break between sets. For “quality” burpees, she says to do the following: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and a slight bend in your knees; make sure that you are not pushing through the toes of your feet but you are starting centered. As you jump, remember to land softly because you want to protect your joints. When you make your way down to the plank position, make sure your core is protected, that means keep your hips square and your butt out of the sky.
One almost overall finding, at least in endurance and strengthendurance athletes having OTS, is a diminished maximal lactate concentration, whereas submaximal values remain unchanged or slightly reduced.10 12 This is confirmed in the present study where OTS patients did not reach maximal lactate concentrations above 8 mmol l−1. Two out of the four NFO patients did not reach [La]max of 8 mmol l−1 at the first exercise test either (for one patient [La]max was missing). Thus, although low [La]max has frequently been described as a diagnostic marker for OTS, from these results, it does not seem sensitive enough to distinguish OTS from NFO.
The express route to a two-piece starts here: Bikini Body: Absolution. The pair of 20-minute workouts take the burn-and-firm approach to cinching with a cardio-focused session of jumps, squats, lunges and planks, then a toning series of what a reviewer described as "new-to-me ab exercises that kick the typical crunch's booty." Get ready for the wood-chopping arabesque move, one tester jokingly warned. So sore but so sleek!
What is your current fitness level? – knowing where you are fitness wise may be a hard thing for some to admit, but answering yourself honestly will ensure that you don’t start off with videos you may not even be able to keep up with not to mention finish. There is nothing more discouraging than getting an exercise video and then finding out that you can’t even handle their warm up. The most important thing to keep in mind is that just because you may be starting off at the very beginner’s level, you certainly don’t have to stay there. The more you exercise the stronger you will get and the more your fitness level will increase. It didn’t take over night to end up where you’re starting from so you shouldn’t expect yourself to fix it over night as well.
Exercise was defined as planned, structured activities, for instance going for walks, skiing, swimming and doing sports, but also as unplanned activities that the participants experienced as exercise. The participants were asked to fill in exercise logs immediately after each exercise session they performed throughout the year and send them to the research center either in prepaid envelopes monthly, or to use internet-based forms following each exercise session [21]. Exercise frequency was calculated as the mean number of sessions reported per week during the year. To assess intensity of exercise the participants reported their subjective RPE on a Borg scale ranging from 6 to 20 [20]. The participants were asked to report the mean intensity level during the exercise session. Ratings from 6 to 10 were classified as low intensity, 11 to 14 as moderate intensity, and 15 to 20 as high intensity. Duration of exercise was measured with a 4-point scale: less than 15 min, 15–29 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h. Less than 15 min and 15–29 min was combined due to a low response rate on these response options (1.1 and 8.7% of the total number of exercise sessions, respectively).

Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.1 article “Mechanisms and Mediators of the Skeletal Muscle Repeated Bout Effect” from author Rob Hyldahl. Skeletal muscle adapts to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating several but still poorly understood mechanisms that endow protection from subsequent damage. Known widely as the repeated bout effect, we propose that neural adaptations, alterations to muscle mechanical properties, structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and biochemical signaling work in concert to coordinate the protective adaptation.

Checkley, Müller, Alexander, and Pilates initiated their interests from a self-requirement to improve health or overcome functional loss. They subsequently used their bodies as a model to demonstrate their method’s effectiveness and encourage others. Despite their turn of the 20th century separation from the gymnasium ‘Physical Culture’ and new independence, all six MMB pioneers advocated their exercises as an adjunct to other sports and regular daily activity; Müller recommended running on the balls of the feet as an aerobic activity, Pilates worked with dancers, while Morris, who besides her dedication to dance and dancers’ health also published ‘Tennis by Simple Exercises’ in 1937 together with French tennis mega-star Suzanne Lenglen.60 Lenglen S, Morris M. Tennis by simple exercises. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar]


The exercises that Kuhn provided can be viewed as a partial list of exercises that might be appropriate for treating an individual with RCIS. We offer modifications to 3 of the proposed exercises and discuss factors used by athletic trainers and physical therapists to establish initial exercise selection, intensity, and periodic modification of an exercise program that were not discussed by Kuhn. Based on current evidence, the anterior shoulder stretch in the proposed protocol might not be the most effective way to stretch the pectoral muscles. When performing the stretch as described in the protocol, the individual is instructed to place his or her hands at shoulder level on either side of a door or corner and to lean forward. This might be a preferred position to initiate pectoral muscle stretch if the individual is unable to perform stretching with the arm elevated as a result of pain; however, evidence3 indicates that changing the position of the upper extremity so that the individual's hand is above the head with the shoulder in 90° of abduction and 90° of external rotation likely provides a more effective stretch.
The Alfredson protocol should be continued for 12 weeks to see optimal results.  During that time, you may wish to consult with a physical therapist who can offer advice on when to return to normal activities, such as running.  Your physical therapist can prescribe balance exercises with a BAPS board and plyometric exercises to ensure that you will be able to run and jump without suffering a re-injury to your Achilles' tendon.
Jump up ^ Gallaugher, P. E; Thorarensen, H; Kiessling, A; Farrell, A. P (2001). "Effects of high intensity exercise training on cardiovascular function, oxygen uptake, internal oxygen transport and osmotic balance in chinook salmon (Oncorhynchus tshawytscha) during critical speed swimming". The Journal of Experimental Biology. 204 (Pt 16): 2861–72. PMID 11683441.
By 1925, Margaret Morris had already integrated remedial exercises within her newly established dance school, Margaret Morris Movement (MMM). Her philosophy claimed that natural dance moves should be healthy and constructive for the body and mind, rather than the deleterious moves dancers were expected to practice and perform at the time. Morris saw the connections between breathing, stamina, range of motion, posture, health, vitality, and how these freed the body to dance and the mind to be creative.49 Morris M. My life in movement. London: Peter Owen Publishers; 1969. [Google Scholar] This philosophy extended itself to the use of natural dance moves as remedial exercises and a healthy active lifestyle. During 1925 and 1926, Morris presented her method to doctors and midwifes in England, France, and Switzerland, among them the St Thomas team. As a result of this meeting, Morris enrolled to study physiotherapy under Randell and graduated in 1933 with distinction.30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar] Throughout her decade of collaboration with Randell and the St Thomas Project, Morris continued to educate and run MMM with great appreciation from top-tier dancers, students, and artistic critiques. By 1939, her teachers developed movement education and dance centers in 10 countries, most still active today (Figures 7–9).30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar]
Mice having access to activity wheels engaged in voluntary exercise and increased their propensity to run as adults.[150] Artificial selection of mice exhibited significant heritability in voluntary exercise levels,[151] with "high-runner" breeds having enhanced aerobic capacity,[152] hippocampal neurogenesis,[153] and skeletal muscle morphology.[154]
Stand with feet shoulder-width apart. Lift right leg straight back and up; at same time, hinge at waist and bring hands or fingertips to floor in front of left foot. Bend both knees, bringing right knee behind left knee. Press back up through left foot to return to previous position. Do 15 reps, keeping leg raised, then switch sides and repeat. Do 3 sets.

Exercise is a key part of staying healthy, but figuring out how to get more active can be tough. If you’re not used to physical activity, start slow. Go for 10 to 15 minute walks, and work your way up to briskly walking or jogging for 30 minutes daily. Try adding strengthening exercises 2 or 3 days per week, and consider boosting your flexibility with yoga or Pilates classes. Whenever you work out, always listen to your body’s limits, and ask your doctor for advice if you have a history of any medical issues.


This reformer exercise is an efficient way to work the entire lower body.  Kneel on the reformer and round the back, keeping the arms straight. Use the butt muscles and thighs to push and pull your lower body back and forth. The platform will slide a few inches with each movement. Do five reps. As you get more advanced, do another five reps with the back arched.
Stuck in the strength training doldrums? Our best piece of fitness advice is that "Variety is key." Greatist has shared all sorts of ways to take workouts from "hum drum" to "hot stuff." We're now turning our eye to eight effective strength training techniques. So grab that workout log and a pen, because here are some great ways to challenge the status quo and add a little variety to the normal gym routine.
To qualify for inclusion, studies had to be level 1 or level 2 (randomized controlled trials); had to compare rehabilitation interventions, such as exercise or manual therapy, with other treatments or placebo; had to include validated outcome measures of pain, function, or disability; and had to be limited to individuals with diagnosed impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome was determined by a positive impingement sign per Neer or Hawkins criteria, or both. Articles were excluded if they addressed other shoulder conditions (eg, calcific tendinosis, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, adhesive capsulitis, osteoarthritis), addressed postoperative management, were retrospective studies or case series, or used other outcome measures.
Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.  Pilates swiftly gained prominence with dancers and celebrities, which led to his notoriety as a New York City exercise personality. In 1932, Pilates taught Contrology exercises at the mythological Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival as he did every summer until 1951.42,43 Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.
Sometimes the terms 'dynamic' and 'static' are used.[citation needed] 'Dynamic' exercises such as steady running, tend to produce a lowering of the diastolic blood pressure during exercise, due to the improved blood flow. Conversely, static exercise (such as weight-lifting) can cause the systolic pressure to rise significantly, albeit transiently, during the performance of the exercise.[8]
There are many ways to do a handstand push-up. One starts in the handstand position against a wall. HOW TO DO IT: To complete this movement, lower your body to the ground so that your head touches the ground (or mat) below. Then, push yourself away from the ground into a handstand. You can also kip this so that your lower body helps drive the upper body. This can be done by bringing your knees to your chest while you lower your head toward the ground. Then, kick up to the sky as you push off of the ground with your hands. The two forces combine to bring you back to the beginning handstand position. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, core and triceps.
DOMS stands for delayed onset muscle soreness, which is the soreness you feel the day or two after a hard workout. This happens because when you’re working out you’re damaging muscle fibers (that’s a good thing!). The muscle then repairs and rebuilds and that’s how you get stronger. The soreness and pain you feel from DOMS comes from the chemicals that set off pain receptors during the repair process, Robert Hyldahl, Ph.D., an exercise physiologist at Brigham Young University, previously explained to SELF. This soreness may last anywhere from 24 to 72 hours after your workout. (Here’s what to do when DOMS kicks in after a workout.)
^ Jump up to: a b c Paillard T, Rolland Y, de Souto Barreto P (July 2015). "Protective Effects of Physical Exercise in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Narrative Review". J Clin Neurol. 11 (3): 212–219. doi:10.3988/jcn.2015.11.3.212. PMC 4507374. PMID 26174783. Aerobic physical exercise (PE) activates the release of neurotrophic factors and promotes angiogenesis, thereby facilitating neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, which in turn improve memory and cognitive functions. ... Exercise limits the alteration in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and contributes to optimal functioning of the basal ganglia involved in motor commands and control by adaptive mechanisms involving dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission.

This exercise is similar in movement to the back squat; however, the bar sits in the front rack position across the collarbones and shoulders of the athlete. HOW TO DO IT: As you drive back up, it is imperative that you raise your elbows to the sky to keep the bar in the correct position. The core should be tight to prevent the back from rounding. If you have mobility issues in the front rack position, you can cross your forearms in front of your body, parallel to the ground. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves and core.


A pair of small hand-weights adds punch to a Pilates workout at home. For this move, imagine you are twirling the weights like sparklers on the Fourth of July. Stand with the weights held at your thighs. Turn them slightly in to face each other and make eight small circles. Each circle should be a little higher until the hands are overhead. Make eight circles in the opposite direction as you lower the arms. Repeat 2-3 times.

Anaerobic tips for beginners: build up your aerobic capabilities and some baseline level strength a bit before trying to sprint or do activities that require explosive movement. If you do decide to do anaerobic exercise, shorten the timeframe for which you perform the exercise. For example, sprint for 10 seconds instead of 30. Do three sets of five box jumps instead of 15.
Strength training means using resistance to work your muscles; that can be your bodyweight, dumbbells, kettlebells, sand bags, resistance bands, etc. The goal of this type of workout is to increase muscle mass. Getting stronger helps improve everyday performance (from sports to regular life), prevent injuries, and increase your metabolism. Need a primer on where to start? We’ve got you covered.
But…. I am not sure why, but I am finding lunges virtually impossible!! I am practicing but even static lunges with just my body weight are so hard to do, I am also only feeling them in the front of my leg. I know to keep 90 degree angles, not to bend forward at the waist and not to extend my knee forward of my foot, so I am wondering if maybe my hamstrings are just pathetically weak or something?!?
If sit-ups give you a sore neck, try this alternative. Lie flat with the end of a resistance band or towel tucked under the center of your back. Bend your knees and grab the other end of the band above your head. Inhale and use your ab muscles to slowly peel your body up, letting your head rest against the band. Exhale and return to the starting position. Do five reps, making sure your abs do all the work.

Although there have been hundreds of studies on physical exercise and the immune system, there is little direct evidence on its connection to illness. Epidemiological evidence suggests that moderate exercise has a beneficial effect on the human immune system; an effect which is modeled in a J curve. Moderate exercise has been associated with a 29% decreased incidence of upper respiratory tract infections (URTI), but studies of marathon runners found that their prolonged high-intensity exercise was associated with an increased risk of infection occurrence. However, another study did not find the effect. Immune cell functions are impaired following acute sessions of prolonged, high-intensity exercise, and some studies have found that athletes are at a higher risk for infections. Studies have shown that strenuous stress for long durations, such as training for a marathon, can suppress the immune system by decreasing the concentration of lymphocytes.[26] The immune systems of athletes and nonathletes are generally similar. Athletes may have slightly elevated natural killer cell count and cytolytic action, but these are unlikely to be clinically significant.[27]

This DVD is focused on strength training — you can choose whether you want to do an upper body workout, a lower body workout, an abs and back routine, or a quickie 10-minute total body workout. But don't think you have to already be super buff to jump in: This workout is designed for people of any fitness level — though you will need some equipment for it, like a stretch band and exercise ball.
“Everyone can dance! Just embrace your style! And, if it’s for fitness, well, the point is to get you moving, not to be a professional! So, if you’re sweating and having a good time, you’re doing it right!” says Blogilates creator Cassey Ho. In this video, she takes you through a step-by-step, 14-minute dance cardio workout, complete with instructions. This video is great for those who need a bit of extra guidance. After you’ve learned the exercises, you may even be able to take a few of these moves to the floor.
Ready to take it to the next level? This workout with Chloe Bent is a full-length, 30-minute calorie burner that’s filled with dance moves that hit all the major muscle groups. After this dance routine, you’ll feel like your living room just became a stage. Take on this bodyweight routine at home when you need to spice up your cardio regimen. If you’re a beginner, don’t fret: This will be a great challenge for you.

One of the easiest parts of starting an exercise program is deciding to do it. Usually there's something inspiring you to make a change: Maybe you tried on a pair of jeans that were too tight or there's an upcoming event—a reunion, wedding, or party—where you're going to see people you haven't seen in a while. Whatever it is, you're motivated, you're excited, and the fantasy of a new, slimmer you is enough to inspire you.
Let’s just call this the accelerated beginner’s guide to bodybuilding. In this plan, your first month of training will be demanding, but not so demanding as to cause injury (or worse yet, burnout), and progressive in the sense that each week you’ll graduate to different exercises, higher volume, more intensity or all of the above. After four weeks you’ll not only be ready for the next challenge but you’ll have built a significant amount of quality muscle. In other words, one month from now you’ll look significantly better with your shirt off than you look now. (How’s that for results?)
Seven minutes of exercise per day a few times a week though isn’t a magical elixir that will give you a bikini-ready body in a few weeks. Michelle Golla, of Denver-based Boost 180 Fitness, says, “it's important not to set unrealistic expectations for a 7-minute workout. It will not completely transform your body, but it is a great way to get your heart pumping and burn calories all day long when you're pressed for time.”  
How would you like to get more out of your workouts? If your main goal is to burn fat, many traditional exercises and training styles may not be the best route for you. Typically when I'm at the gym and I look around I see a bunch of people doing exercises that don't really match up with their goals. If you're trying to get some bigger biceps you shouldn't be on the eliptical doing hours of cardio and conversely if you're trying to lose some weight and burn some belly fat you shouldn't be smashing out set after set of bicep curls. Exercises and training styles are like tools and before you just assume that watching one or two rocky movies is all the knowledge you need on exercising let's make sure that you've chosen the right tool for the job or I should for your goal. If your goal is to lose belly fat I hate to break it to you, but there is no exercise that can directly target the fat on your belly, but there are plenty of exercise methods that can indirectly burn the fat from your belly, and in this video I'll be going over ten of these methods....These training methods will help you burn more fat during & after your workout. Let's start with the very first one & that's peripheral heart action training. This is my favorite way to do all my weight training workouts, and I highly suggest that if you're trying to lose some belly fat you incorporate this style of training right away. In general your workouts for the week should be a mixture of some more aerobic & some more anaerobic workouts, meaning some of them will be geared more towards lifting heavy weights & others should be geared towards improving your cardiovascular function. But what you'll notice is that during your heavy weight training days, you wind up taking longer breaks & not breathing quite as heavy. Sometimes after some weight training workouts besides the soreness that you might feel in your muscles you may not feel like you worked out at all. So that's where peripheral heart action training comes into play. It helps incorporate an element of cardio into your weight training workout without you having to sacrifice the amount of weight your lifting. So you won't get weaker, but you'll be able to burn much more calories & accomplish much more in a shorter period of time. The best way to do this is by combining an upper body & a lower body movement into one set. For example you can combine a bench press with a squat. So you would do six to eight reps on the bench press & then right away with no break you would do squats for six to eight reps. You would perform both of these exercises with a heavy weight load & you would only take a break after completing both of them. With peripheral heart action training what you're doing is taking the blood that your heart would normally just have to pump to your chest & arms if you were just doing bench press by itself & what your doing is your forcing your body to pull & pump all that blood back down to your legs right after your set of bench without any break or recovery. This makes your heart work much harder allowing you to get your heart rate & breathing rate higher & this will burn more calories & fat in the process. Now let's say that you don't want to work legs & upper body in the same day you want to focus on each on separate days. Well the good news is that peripheral heart action training doesn't only work only if you combine an upper & a lower body movement. It'll also work if you combine two movements that work opposing muscle groups. For example if you combine chest & back movements together with no break. Or if you do quad & hamstring movements together with no break your heart will still have to work much harder to push the blood from the anterior part of your body to the posterior part of your body. So peripheral heart action training try it out. The second exercise style that can help you burn a lot more belly fat is known as cardio acceleration training. We actually have a whole hour long class at our gyms dedicated to this type of training because it's so effective. Once again it involves super setting two exercises. Except this time instead of doing two weight training exercises back to back we're combining a weight training exercise with a cardio exercise with no break. So an example of this would be to perform a set of barbell squats with heavy weight for let's say six to ten reps & then immediately with no break once you rack the bar you go right into high knees for thirty to forty five seconds. Then take a break & repeat for three to four sets

The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology has published "The Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness & Lifestyle Approach", which details fitness assessment protocols. One such protocol, the mCAFT, is designed to give information about the aerobic fitness of a person, while using minimal equipment. The subject works by lifting its own body weight up and down double steps (40.6 cm in height total) while listening to set cadences from a compact disc. The end-stage of the age and gender specific stepping rate requires 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. The heart rate increases approximately in a linear fashion from 50% to 100% of maximal oxygen intake. The heart rate does not decrease significantly during the first fifteen seconds of recovery. Thus, one can predict an aerobic fitness using the heart rate right after exercise of a known sub-maximal rate of working.
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