Jump up ^ Carroll ME, Smethells JR (February 2016). "Sex Differences in Behavioral Dyscontrol: Role in Drug Addiction and Novel Treatments". Front. Psychiatry. 6: 175. doi:10.3389/fpsyt.2015.00175. PMC 4745113. PMID 26903885. There is accelerating evidence that physical exercise is a useful treatment for preventing and reducing drug addiction ... In some individuals, exercise has its own rewarding effects, and a behavioral economic interaction may occur, such that physical and social rewards of exercise can substitute for the rewarding effects of drug abuse. ... The value of this form of treatment for drug addiction in laboratory animals and humans is that exercise, if it can substitute for the rewarding effects of drugs, could be self-maintained over an extended period of time. Work to date in [laboratory animals and humans] regarding exercise as a treatment for drug addiction supports this hypothesis. ... However, a RTC study was recently reported by Rawson et al. (226), whereby they used 8 weeks of exercise as a post-residential treatment for METH addiction, showed a significant reduction in use (confirmed by urine screens) in participants who had been using meth 18 days or less a month. ... Animal and human research on physical exercise as a treatment for stimulant addiction indicates that this is one of the most promising treatments on the horizon. [emphasis added]
Intensity: The best exercise intensity for CFS/ME patients is low intensity and low-impact, at least in the beginning. IF post exercise malaise occurs, try not to skip workouts, just go back to a lower intensity and less duration. Please note that I do consider cleaning one of those daily activities that can be harder on the fibro body than structured exercise. Do not determine your ability to exercise on difficulty with cleaning, bending, stopping, starting, etc that is involved there.

I absolutely love your site. I discovered it on Pinterest and as I dug into the workouts and plans I couldn't believe that I hadn't heard of it before! It empowers women with limited resources and time to complete awesome workouts from home with very little equipment ;) thank you! I have already recommended your site to several of my friends and family.
Rake those leaves. Raking is already an excellent calorie-burning activity, so do it! Raking is not only great for your yard and lawn, but also for your body. Because your core (your back and abdomen) has to work to stabilize your body while your arms are maneuvering the rake, raking is good exercise for both your arms and core. Weirdly, there's a page all about raking as a workout, which you can read here.
As you strengthen your abs, it's vital to tone the back of the body as well. Lie on your back with your knees bent and your feet hip-width apart. Keep your arms at your sides and raise your hips without arching your back. Tighten the muscles of your buttocks and hamstrings, and hold for five breaths. Lower down one vertebra at a time to the floor if you're stopping here, or go on to the advanced posture.
There are many ways to do a handstand push-up. One starts in the handstand position against a wall. HOW TO DO IT: To complete this movement, lower your body to the ground so that your head touches the ground (or mat) below. Then, push yourself away from the ground into a handstand. You can also kip this so that your lower body helps drive the upper body. This can be done by bringing your knees to your chest while you lower your head toward the ground. Then, kick up to the sky as you push off of the ground with your hands. The two forces combine to bring you back to the beginning handstand position. MUSCLES USED: Shoulders, core and triceps.
The MMB exercises are not pathology orientated or sport specific, rather all exercises are recommended for everybody, whether they are injured, healthy, or a competitive athlete; the ability to perform the exercises represents the normal. The exercises and sequence do not change, besides the difficulty levels which are adjusted according to the individual level of practice. The MMB progressions occur when the exercises become easier and eventually autonomous and harmonious, ensuring the short- and long-term benefits of practice. Harmonious breathing and relaxation techniques are employed in every exercise repetition. Furthermore, there is the recommendation to train daily in relaxed environments, with abundant fresh air and appropriate sunlight levels and to bath regularly. Studio training is recommended for beginners, people with ailments or performing athletes.
For active types, nagging injuries nag a little louder; hard workouts deplete you a bit more. For serious recreational athletes, performance begins to drop, even if you maintain your training regimen. Whatever your sport of choice — be it distance running, competitive cycling, or pick-up basketball — you can expect your performance to plateau and recovery to take a bit longer.
Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.
This study was supported by grants from the Liaison Committee for education, research and innovation in Central Norway, The K.G Jebsen Foundation for medical research and the Research Council of Norway. The funding organizations had no role in the design and execution of the study, in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data, or in the preparation, review or approval of the submitted manuscript.
One near constant at this age is stiffer joints. Movement of all kinds — which floods joints with oxygenated blood — is helpful. But mobility and flexibility exercises that involve large, controlled ranges of motion in the ankles, hips, shoulders, and upper back can be particularly effective. Try a yoga class, and work mobility into your daily routine as well — anytime and anywhere. Gently stretch however it feels good, and as often as you remember.
Use your toilet time wisely. Take advantage of that toilet time by doing some kegels. Kegels are the muscles used to stop the flow of urination, so practice clenching those muscles the next time you're doing your business. Both men and women can do kegels, which will not only help guard against incontinence, but may also improve bedroom endurance, if you catch my drift.
To shake up your strength workout, replace the everyone-does-'em moves (crunches, etc.) with this fresh routine created by Dixon. Do this series two to three times per week, alternating with cardio days; you'll start to see results in as little as two to three weeks. Each move hits the same major muscle groups as the old standbys, but challenges them more, giving you a stronger, sleeker body in the same amount of time. So it's efficient—in the best way possible.
Let’s just call this the accelerated beginner’s guide to bodybuilding. In this plan, your first month of training will be demanding, but not so demanding as to cause injury (or worse yet, burnout), and progressive in the sense that each week you’ll graduate to different exercises, higher volume, more intensity or all of the above. After four weeks you’ll not only be ready for the next challenge but you’ll have built a significant amount of quality muscle. In other words, one month from now you’ll look significantly better with your shirt off than you look now. (How’s that for results?)

In a studio, you can try the Pilates hundred on a reformer, a spring-based resistance machine. Lie on your back with your legs in table-top position or extended at a 45-degree angle. Pull the straps down next to your abdomen. Curl the head and shoulders up and pulse your arms up and down. Breathe in for five and out for five until you reach 100 pulses. If any move doesn't feel right, check with a fitness professional.


A compound exercise is a move that incorporates multiple muscle groups, like lunges, deadlifts, and squats. It may also refer to two moves being strung together, like a bicep curl to a shoulder press. Compound exercises are efficient for increasing overall muscle mass and burning calories (because they require more effort to complete), as opposed to isolation exercises, which focus on working just one muscle group (like a bicep curl).
By the 1930s, the method was flourishing and the St Thomas faculty was reinforced with two of Randell’s distinguished physiotherapy graduates: Australian hockey star and medical student Barbara Mortimer Thomas (1910–1940), who served as main instructor,29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar] and English dancer and choreographer Margaret Morris (1891–1980), who already used remedial exercises in her dance teaching.30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar] Exercising to the beat of classical music, the dance moves and grace typical of the St Thomas Method exercises are attributed to Morris.
Studies show that with fibromyalgia, the initial rise in oxidative stress will begin to decrease as you continue your workout; however, with CFS, prolonged exercise can increase the oxidative stress and the associated pain. This is where you might feel malaise after exercise as well. You can see why it is necessary to start slow and work up with consistency. Having severe M.E. myself, I know it can be done and it does take persistence. 
If you want to form a gym habit, it can be difficult to know what to do or how to workout. Once you become immersed in exercise, it can feel like there’s not enough time to try all the different things! Plain and simple, this is just a knowledge gap. Learning how to workout is like learning anything else, it requires time, research and study. Hiring a personal trainer is the fastest route around this, but it also helps to be a “student of the game” by continuing to educate yourself.
I have used the standard protocol (10 seconds plus or minus two for both concentric and eccentric contractions) of this method, although sometimes I prefer going a bit faster such as 4/4, 6/6 or 8/8 seconds respectively. It is not easy and even a bit painful to do a single set of each exercise and "inroad" the muscles. Moving from machine to machine between exercises with no rest, one experiences tremendous cardio-respiratory workload (experiences counterpulsation due to very large venous return to the heart) and some feel extreme fatigue when finished. A workout can last as little as 10-12 minutes, based on 5 basic compound exercises (ie: ankle raise, trunk extension, squat, shoulder or chest press, pulldowns), and personally, I found I needed 2 workouts/week in order to achieve the strength gains I desired. Some think only one session per week is needed and I believe this is a personal and time management choice.
Chase Squires is the first to admit that he's no fitness expert. But he is a guy who used to weigh 205 pounds, more than was healthy for his 5'4" frame. "In my vacation pictures in 2002, I looked like the Stay Puft Marshmallow Man at the beach," says the 42-year-old Colorado resident. Squires decided enough was enough, cut out fatty food, and started walking on a treadmill. The pounds came off and soon he was running marathons -- not fast, but in the race. He ran his first 50-mile race in October 2003 and completed his first 100-miler a year later. Since then, he's completed several 100-mile, 50-mile, and 50k races.
Jump up ^ Möhlenkamp S, Lehmann N, Breuckmann F, Bröcker-Preuss M, Nassenstein K, Halle M, Budde T, Mann K, Barkhausen J, Heusch G, Jöckel KH, Erbel R (200). "Running: the risk of coronary events : Prevalence and prognostic relevance of coronary atherosclerosis in marathon runners". Eur. Heart J. 29 (15): 1903–10. doi:10.1093/eurheartj/ehn163. PMID 18426850.
Data were analysed using three different methods: visual inspection, parametric statistics and calculation of sensitivity for both OTS and NFO detection. Because the sample size was rather small (ie, maximal 5 for each group), data were first inspected visually. Parametric statistics and sensitivity calculation were used to support conclusions from visual inspection of the data. For the purpose of visual inspection, we created graphs with averages and SE for both the OTS and the NFO groups.
Tip: Be sure you know which methods of exercise your company allows, and understand the tax consequences discussed in the third, fourth, and fifth articles in this series. Check the stock plan documents for each stock option grant, and complete necessary paperwork before the date you intend to exercise. Ask the stock plan administrator (or appropriate person) for exercise procedures pertaining to each method. Not all companies may have written procedures.

The aims of the present study were to assess the reliability of a novel high intensity OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance, and to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. We demonstrated that our novel high intensity OLDE protocol can be used as a reliable measure of muscle endurance, and that isokinetic muscle fatigue recovers and plateaus within ~ 30 s following exhaustion. Therefore, the novel high intensity OLDE protocol tested in this study might provide an interesting tool to investigate muscle fatigue and muscle endurance.
One way repeated ANOVA was used to compare time to exhaustion between sessions (S1, S2 and S3). Relative reliability was calculated with the intraclass correlation (ICC) model (3, 1) [27]. Absolute reliability was calculated with the typical error of measurement (the standard deviation of the change scores divided by [28, 29]). Bland and Altman’s 95% limits of agreement were also used (calculated for S1 vs S2, S1 vs S3 and S2 vs S3) as an additional representation of measurement error and to identify the presence of heteroscedasticity [19]. As data were heteroscedastic, both raw data and log transformed Bland and Altman’s plots are presented. Limit of agreement ratio (LOA) was also calculated from the log transformed data as follow: LOA = (1.96 × SDdiff / grand mean) × 100; where “SDdiff” represents the SD of the differences between tests (S1 vs S2, S1 vs S3, S2 vs S3) and “grand mean” represents (mean S1 + mean S2 + mean S3)/3. As time to exhaustion data were heteroscedastic, we also calculated the coefficient of variation (CV) for each subject as follow: CV = 100×(SD of the three measurements)/(mean of the three measurements). Mean CV for all subjects were also calculated. We also calculated the smallest worthwhile change (0.2 × between subjects SD) [21].

In an earlier study, we found that in order to detect signs of OTS and distinguish them from normal training responses or FO, this method may be a good indicator not only of the recovery capacity of the athlete but also of the ability to normally perform the second bout of exercise.10 The test could, therefore, be used as an indirect measure of hypothalamic–pituitary capacity. It was hypothesised that on the NFO–OTS continuum, a hypersensitivity of the pituitary is followed by an insensitivity or exhaustion afterwards.10 22 Results from the present study confirm this hypothesis. The NFO athletes showed a very high response to the second exercise bout, at least in ACTH and PRL, whereas the OTS athletes showed suppression.
Exercise was defined as planned, structured activities, for instance going for walks, skiing, swimming and doing sports, but also as unplanned activities that the participants experienced as exercise. The participants were asked to fill in exercise logs immediately after each exercise session they performed throughout the year and send them to the research center either in prepaid envelopes monthly, or to use internet-based forms following each exercise session [21]. Exercise frequency was calculated as the mean number of sessions reported per week during the year. To assess intensity of exercise the participants reported their subjective RPE on a Borg scale ranging from 6 to 20 [20]. The participants were asked to report the mean intensity level during the exercise session. Ratings from 6 to 10 were classified as low intensity, 11 to 14 as moderate intensity, and 15 to 20 as high intensity. Duration of exercise was measured with a 4-point scale: less than 15 min, 15–29 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h. Less than 15 min and 15–29 min was combined due to a low response rate on these response options (1.1 and 8.7% of the total number of exercise sessions, respectively).
A Polar (www.polar.fi) heart rate monitor (belt and watch) is used to measure heart rate continuously. A transmitter belt is fastened around the chest while the watch is held by a nearby observer. If at any time during the experiment the heart rate exceeds the predetermined ceiling (85% of age-predicted max heart rate) the experiment should be stopped immediately.
Bottom line. Strength training with heavy weights is a better way to target your glutes, but that’s not something most people will do. The program includes low- and high-impact routines, so you don’t need to be extremely fit to start. If you don’t mind doing lots of squats and lunges and you like the idea of dancing your way to fitness, this may be good for you. The Brazil Butt Lift eating plan includes basic recipes with easy variations.
If sit-ups give you a sore neck, try this alternative. Lie flat with the end of a resistance band or towel tucked under the center of your back. Bend your knees and grab the other end of the band above your head. Inhale and use your ab muscles to slowly peel your body up, letting your head rest against the band. Exhale and return to the starting position. Do five reps, making sure your abs do all the work.

Park further away. I know a lot of us have developed the (bad) habit of trying to get the parking spot absolutely closest to our destination—I know this because I have both cut-off and been cut-off by some aggressive drivers who really wanted to park 50 feet closer—but this is dumb. Spare yourself the road rage and do your body a favor by parking further away and getting in some extra walking.


In his new P90 DVD set, the supertrainer Tony Horton drops the "X" for an all-levels-welcome version of his wildly popular 90-day program. The 10 workouts—including total-body and core on the floor routines—are mapped out for you in a follow-along schedule. The modification options to the mix of cardio and resistance moves "make every set possible" for a gymlike intensity, testers said, all in 25 minutes. "It doesn't get much better than that," one reviewer raved.
The exercise videos became a series, and Fonda eventually released 23 workout videos. Fonda's exercise videos were such a success because they were the first media of their time to send the message that it was socially acceptable for women to participate in exercise culture and become muscular. Fonda's videos also helped to spark the aerobic exercise trend of the 1980s, not to mention the period's iconic fashion trend: a neon exercise outfit with a leotard and leg warmers. The aerobic exercise craze became so widespread that a Muppets parody tape titled Miss Piggy's Aerobique Exercise Workout Album was released in 1982. The album cover featured Miss Piggy in a Fonda-esque exercise outfit, complete with leg warmers and a leotard, in a pose imitating that which was famously modeled by Jane Fonda on the cover of her first tape.
Intensity: The best exercise intensity for CFS/ME patients is low intensity and low-impact, at least in the beginning. IF post exercise malaise occurs, try not to skip workouts, just go back to a lower intensity and less duration. Please note that I do consider cleaning one of those daily activities that can be harder on the fibro body than structured exercise. Do not determine your ability to exercise on difficulty with cleaning, bending, stopping, starting, etc that is involved there.
"Exercise is the magic pill," says Michael R. Bracko, EdD, FACSM, chairman of the American College of Sports Medicine's Consumer Information Committee. "Exercise can literally cure diseases like some forms of heart disease. Exercise has been implicated in helping people prevent or recover from some forms of cancer. Exercise helps people with arthritis. Exercise helps people prevent and reverse depression."
Anyone who watched Jackie Warner on Bravo's Work Out knows she takes a tough-love approach to fitness. And, clearly, if you've checked out her abs lately, it works. She shares her signature circuit-training workout in this high-energy DVD that gives the option of four different 15-minute workouts or one 40-minute total body circuit, and left me feeling like I just had an up-close-and-personal training session with the exercise guru.
Even after long term IV therapy and other holistic type treatments to treat the Epstein Barr virus and co-infections in the blood, I still have CFS/ME. I have found effective ways to work with CFS/ME, yet this is not an overnight process and all of the lifestyle tools come into play even more so here. Visit our supplement page at anytime where we discuss options for immune support. Be sure you are getting enough zinc. This is sometimes overlooked. An additional 20-50 mg. can be helpful with CFS/ME. 
Neuromuscular function tests were performed pre and post-exercise to quantify muscle fatigue. As previous studies documented the extent of isometric muscle fatigue induced by OLDE [8, 11, 17, 18], we chose to focus only on isokinetic muscle fatigue. Therefore, knee extensors (KE) MVCs were performed at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s pre (after the warm-up) and post-exercise (13 ± 4s after exhaustion). Subjects were asked to perform two maximal isokinetic knee extensions at each angular velocity (starting position corresponded to knee angle at 90 deg; range of motion was the same as the OLDE). The highest peak torque value of the two trials was considered, and a 20 s recovery was set between each set of KE MVCs. The order of contractions was randomized between sessions as follow (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s) and identical for testing pre and post-exercise of the same session. This randomization allows obtaining a time course of KE MVC torque recovery following the time to exhaustion test at each angular velocity was obtained at a different time point at each session: either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s after exhaustion), 20 s following exhaustion test (P20) and 40 s following exhaustion test (P40). An overview of timing can be found in Fig 1. Twenty seconds after completion of the last KE MVC, a maximal isometric MVC of the knee flexors was performed (isometric KF MVC). Visual feedback of the torque and strong verbal encouragement were provided for each MVC [please see reference 9 for more details].
Because CFS/ME is often related to viral issues or co-infections in the body, the immune system is "working overtime". CFS can actually be more debilitating than fibromyalgia, depending on the pain levels within fibro on any given day. This is simply due to the complex nature of CFS within the immune system. In fact, my preferred reference to this illness is not CFS but rather CFIDS or ME (Chronic Fatigue Immune Deficiency Syndrome OR Myalgic Encephalomyelitis)
All six MMB pioneers expected near magical effects from the regular non-exhausting practice of their exercise regimes. This promised a lifetime of optimal health, beauty, and strength for the body and mind. Further, expected benefits include improved quality and efficacy of daily activities, looking and feeling good, making life itself easier and more pleasurable with a disappearance or reduction of symptoms while improving postures. This leads to increased self-esteem, reduced health costs, and the expectation of a longer and high-quality life. It is interesting to note that all six MMB pioneers enjoyed long and fruitful lives that reflect this philosophical model within real life examples: Checkley died in 1925 at 78; Müller in 1938 at 72; Alexander in 1955 at 86; Randell in 1974 at 99; Pilates in 1967 at 87; and Morris in 1980 at 89.
What Does the Workout Focus on? – This goes along with matching the exercise video to what you want to work on in your fitness goals. Make sure the exercise video you choose will help you reach the fitness goals you have. For example, if one of your goals is to work on getting flatter abs and there is not an abs exercise on the whole video, this is a major fitness goal that goes untouched. With the variety of exercise videos on the market today, you will be able to find an exercise video that helps you reach your goals.
The good-morning is a weight training exercise in which a barbell, two dumbbells, or no weight at all is held on the shoulders, behind the head. The person bends forward and bows at the hips and recovers to upright. The good-morning is so called because the movement resembles bowing to greet someone. It involves the hamstrings but is primarily used to strengthen the lower back; the degree of knee bend used will change the focus – nearly straight-legged involving the hamstrings most.

Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.
Planks are a quadruple threat, and by holding one for just 30 seconds a day, you will instantly start seeing results on your abdominal muscles, arms, triceps, and core. Riggins suggests doing low and high planks for 30 seconds each. For the low plank, he says to “get up on your elbows and your feet like a push-up position. You can modify by getting on your knees and hold for 30 seconds.” For the high plank do the same but “hold your legs straight” for 30 seconds. If abs are your problem area, don’t miss our helpful article Can’t Get Cut Abs? A Celeb Trainer Explains Why!
If there’s one travel-friendly workout tool, it’s the resistance band. Not only does it weigh next to nothing and take up little room in your bag, it’s also super versatile. And if you’re a fan of our full-body resistance band workout, you’ll definitely dig this free workout video. It combines strength movements, like rear lunges with a rotation, with heart rate-boosting exercises for a routine that’ll challenge your entire body.
This is what you should be doing before exercise to raise your heart rate and body temperature in preparation for the workout. During this type of warm-up, you moving through stretches and light exercises without stopping (as opposed to a passive stretches, which are held in place, like you do in a cool-down). This helps increase mobility and range of motion so you can get deeper into exercises. Here are five great dynamic warm-up stretches to try.
Jump up ^ Farina N, Rusted J, Tabet N (January 2014). "The effect of exercise interventions on cognitive outcome in Alzheimer's disease: a systematic review". Int Psychogeriatr. 26 (1): 9–18. doi:10.1017/S1041610213001385. PMID 23962667. Six RCTs were identified that exclusively considered the effect of exercise in AD patients. Exercise generally had a positive effect on rate of cognitive decline in AD. A meta-analysis found that exercise interventions have a positive effect on global cognitive function, 0.75 (95% CI = 0.32–1.17). ... The most prevalent subtype of dementia is Alzheimer’s disease (AD), accounting for up to 65.0% of all dementia cases ... Cognitive decline in AD is attributable at least in part to the buildup of amyloid and tau proteins, which promote neuronal dysfunction and death (Hardy and Selkoe, 2002; Karran et al., 2011). Evidence in transgenic mouse models of AD, in which the mice have artificially elevated amyloid load, suggests that exercise programs are able to improve cognitive function (Adlard et al., 2005; Nichol et al., 2007). Adlard and colleagues also determined that the improvement in cognitive performance occurred in conjunction with a reduced amyloid load. Research that includes direct indices of change in such biomarkers will help to determine the mechanisms by which exercise may act on cognition in AD.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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