One way repeated ANOVAs (time: isotime from first to seventh minute and exhaustion) were used to test the time course of EMG RMS for all muscles, leg RPE, leg muscle pain and heart rate. Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (1st minute vs other time points, exhaustion vs other time points) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction.
The squat is performed by squatting down with a weight held across the upper back under neck and standing up straight again. This is a compound exercise that also involves the glutes (buttocks) and, to a lesser extent, the hamstrings, calves, and the lower back. Lifting belts are sometimes used to help support the lower back. The freeweight squat is one of 'The Big Three' powerlifting exercises, along with the deadlift and the bench press.[2]
One way repeated ANOVAs (time: isotime from first to seventh minute and exhaustion) were used to test the time course of EMG RMS for all muscles, leg RPE, leg muscle pain and heart rate. Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (1st minute vs other time points, exhaustion vs other time points) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction.
Eight healthy and moderately active (a minimum of 2 h of aerobic activity per week) adults (mean ± SD; age: 22 ± 2 yrs, height: 171 ± 8 cm, weight: 69 ± 8 kg, 5 males and 3 females) volunteered to participate in this study. None of the subjects had any known mental or somatic disorder. Each subject gave written informed consent prior to the study. Experimental protocol and procedures were approved by the local Ethics Committee of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Kent at Medway (Ethic clearance Prop97_2013_14). The study conformed to the standards set by the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki “Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects” (2008). All subjects were given written instructions describing all procedures related to the study.

Ten patients who consulted a sports physician with complaints of underperformance and fatigue participated in the present study. The eight men and two women had an average height and weight of 181±(8) cm and 68.4±(11.8) kg. All subjects were diagnosed by a sports physician according to the latest guidelines for overtraining diagnosis.1 18 A careful history including training history was taken, completed by a physical examination and a blood draw to rule out other possible causes for the complaints. Patients were diagnosed as NFO or OTS retrospectively according to the severity of symptoms and the total duration of symptoms and underperformance (ie, both before and after testing) when no medical explanation for the condition could be found. It turned out that a cutoff of 1-year total duration gave a good distinction between NFO and OTS patients. Demographic data and reported symptoms can be found in table 1. Data of subject 1 are the same as presented in an earlier publication.10 All subjects signed informed consent before participation.


How much space do you have to exercise? – Do you have plenty of space to move around freely without hitting or running into anything? If you get kickboxing style exercise videos will you be able to follow the moves without taking out a living room lamp? Knowing how much space you will have to work out will help you match the exercise videos your purchase to the space you will be using to watch them and follow along.
Conclusions: Rediscovering the Western mind–body exercise movement is hoped to facilitate official healthcare establishment recognition of this kind of training as an integral entity. This may widen research opportunities and consolidate approaches toward: optimal musculoskeletal rehabilitation and injury prevention, promotion of a healthy active lifestyle environment in the modern world, and enhancement of the natural pain-free human athletic look, feel, and performance.
What are your fitness goals? – Do you want to tone up? Lose fat and inches? Gain lean muscle mass? Maintain your weight? Reshape Your body? There are a number of fitness goals you could be interested in and many people have more than one, for example they want to lose fat and inches AND reshape their bodies. What your fitness goals are can determine the type of exercise videos that will fit those needs and goals the best.
The main strength of this study is the large data material on exercise patterns. Most research on exercise pattern has used a cross-sectional design whereas we followed older adults over a one-year period and collected data from each exercise session they performed. Furthermore, this is the first study to assess differences in exercise patterns between older adults instructed to follow MCT versus HIIT.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 46.3 article “The Microvasculature and Skeletal Muscle Healthin Aging” from authors Rian Q. Landers-Ramos and Steven J. Prior. Aging and aging-related declines in physical activity are associated with physical and metabolic impairments. Skeletal muscle capillarization is reduced in sedentary older adults, may contribute to impairments in skeletal muscle, and is modifiable by exercise training. This article examines the hypothesis that preservation of skeletal muscle capillarization is essential to maintain metabolism, fitness, and function with aging.
Many exercise interventions have been conducted under controlled laboratory conditions [9], but we do not know how older adults prefer to exercise when they are not under controlled settings and are free to choose type, location and social setting (e.g. alone vs. together with others) of exercise. Furthermore, it has been shown that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can induce superior changes in health-related markers compared to continuous moderate-intensity training (MCT) [10–13], also in older adults [14, 15]. The scientific interest in HIIT has greatly increased during recent years [9], but larger and longer studies under free-living conditions are needed to investigate whether HIIT is feasible as a public health strategy among older adults [9, 16]. Therefore, detailed information about older adults exercise patterns with MCT versus HIIT outside laboratory conditions is of particular interest.
Flexibility exercise, or stretching, is a vital component of any exercise regimen. The primary purpose of flexibility training is to increase your range of motion, especially when it comes to muscles and joints. Although flexibility exercise will not improve your endurance or strength as cardio or anaerobic exercise would, flexibility training helps your body maintain its natural alignment. By doing so, flexibility exercise makes your body significantly less prone to injury during cardio or anaerobic exercise. Additionally, practicing flexibility training will increase your freedom of movement in a way that makes everyday activities easier. Tasks such as reaching up for an object on a shelf, getting up from a chair, or even sitting in confined spaces for long periods of time will greatly benefit from flexibility training.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
×