Stuck in the strength training doldrums? Our best piece of fitness advice is that "Variety is key." Greatist has shared all sorts of ways to take workouts from "hum drum" to "hot stuff." We're now turning our eye to eight effective strength training techniques. So grab that workout log and a pen, because here are some great ways to challenge the status quo and add a little variety to the normal gym routine.
Aerobic exercise is any physical activity that uses large muscle groups and causes the body to use more oxygen than it would while resting.[3] The goal of aerobic exercise is to increase cardiovascular endurance.[4] Examples of aerobic exercise include running, cycling, swimming, brisk walking, skipping rope, rowing, hiking, playing tennis, continuous training, and long slow distance training.[3]

Rather than doing your meetings over coffee, why don’t you invite people to go for a walking meeting? Steve Jobs, Winston Churchill and many U.S. Presidents have been huge advocates of this practice for both health and camaraderie purposes. Even if you’re just taking a phone call, use it as an opportunity to take a walk around the block or to your next destination.
If you don't have access to weights, then you can perform resistance exercises utilizing just the weight of your own body. These types of exercises include pull ups, push ups, crunches, squats, and lunges. If you'd like to find a well designed workout using body weight resistance, try the Slow Burn Fitness Revolution, which relies on slow movements to really increase intensity as you perform isotonic exercises.

Making the commitment to start an exercise program is an exciting first step in improving your life through increased physical and mental health. After all, what better investment can you make than in yourself? If you’ve struggled with not having enough time, money, energy or motivation to work out, push them aside and remember that you’re worth it. No excuses!

(2) Active Phase (between 60% and 84% HRR). Continuous dynamic and interval training mode exercise involving large muscle activities with an increasing level of difficulty and intensity. Subjects began with a short walk, alternated with various step exercises (e.g., both side and forward-backward step up and down on the platform, with alternate footsteps). Then, they went on performing alternate upper-limb lifts (while keeping inferior limbs flexed) and lower limb flexions and extensions (knee lifts, both side and forward-backward leg lifts, and leg curls), as a sort of brief and easy sequence to be repeated for a fixed time. Integrated multiple plane exercises for upper and lower limbs using elastic resistances (Xertube®) completed the last part of the Active Phase. To reach the goal of gradually augmenting the intensity of the program, the coach continuously checked the HRR level of subjects who were progressively increasing the duration and the number of exercises. The resistance of the elastic bands was also increased by one level (from very light to medium) every 4 weeks.

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