First, a disclaimer: I have no financial stake in the sale of any of the other books mentioned below in my review of "Superslow: The Ultimate Exercise Protocol". I'm just interested in promoting safe, logical, scientifically sound methods for people that care about being in good physical condition without any unnecessary risks or wasted time. Any other books or authors mentioned are merely for the purpose of expanding the information available regarding the history (and refinements) of High Intensity Training (HIT) since Arthur Jones first began to popularize the method in the early 1970's.
Resting hormone concentrations have been a topic of many studies and discussions. It has been suggested that conflicting results were, at least partly, because of a lack of standardisation in both the way overtraining was measured and in the hormone measurement protocols used. Results from the present study show that variability in resting hormone concentrations is also present within groups of NFO and OTS patients. The arguments for contradictory findings are not valid within this study where blood was drawn at the same time of day always after an overnight fast. However, the diurnal variation in cortisol cannot be ruled out with this protocol because tests are separated by 4 h. However, each test was done with the same protocol and timing so that the data were collected in a standardised manner. One possible reason why the cortisol levels do not show the same pattern as ACTH might be because of this diurnal variation. Therefore, it must be concluded that resting hormone concentrations are not sensitive enough, at least not to diagnose unexplained underperformance in athletes. It has been suggested that hormonal reactions to stress tests are more sensitive.1 11
The participants completed in total 69 492 exercise logs (33 608 HIIT group) during the year, of which 39 075 were received in prepaid envelopes and 30 417 in internet-based forms. Both groups performed 2.2 ± 1.3 exercise sessions per week. Almost 80% of the sessions in the MCT group were actually performed with moderate intensity (11–14 on the Borg scale), while almost 60% of the sessions in the HIIT group were performed with high intensity (≥15 on the Borg scale) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, women had a significantly higher proportion of sessions with moderate intensity compared to men (81.7% vs. 74.9%, p < 0.01). In the HIIT group, men had a higher proportion of sessions with high intensity compared to women (63.7% vs. 52.3%, p < 0.01) (Fig. 2). In the MCT group, 9.6, 43 and 47.4% of the sessions had a duration of < 30 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h, respectively. The corresponding percentages in the HIIT group were 10.1, 45 and 44.9%.
"Consider this: Dr. Kenneth Cooper (author of Aerobics, The New Aerobics, Aerobics for Women), the U.S. Air Force Cardiologist who coined the term 'aerobics" (meaning a form of exercise) and has promoted their use for over 25 years, now admits that he was wrong! According to Dr. Cooper, further research has shown that there is no correlation between aerobic endurance performance and health, longevity, or protection against heart disease. He will admit, however, that such activities do carry with them a great risk of injury. Further, he admits that gross-overuse activities such as running are damaging to the body." – Ken Hutchins, SuperSlow Exercise Guild
One of the easiest parts of starting an exercise program is deciding to do it. Usually there's something inspiring you to make a change: Maybe you tried on a pair of jeans that were too tight or there's an upcoming event—a reunion, wedding, or party—where you're going to see people you haven't seen in a while. Whatever it is, you're motivated, you're excited, and the fantasy of a new, slimmer you is enough to inspire you.
This gymnastics move is for the advanced CrossFitter. Hailing from gymnastics, the ring muscle-up is one of the hardest moves a CrossFitter can complete. HOW TO DO IT: Start with either a false grip or regular grip. For the false grip, hook your wrists into the ring. This position, while uncomfortable, shortens the lever of the arm, creating less distance for you to travel. Most CrossFitters kip this move because of its degree of difficulty, but it can be done strict as well. Swing your body back to gain momentum and thrust your hips into the air while pulling with all your upper body strength (similar to a pull-up) so that the body raises to ring height or above. Always keep the rings as close to your body as possible to have the most control and strength on the rings. Once you are at ring height, quickly push your head and chest through the rings into a dip position. Then push up out of the dip position with a kip from the legs or from strict strength. MUSCLES USED: Back, shoulders, core and triceps.

Simply put, progressive overload means that you are consistently lifting or pulling a little more each week (or progressively on a schedule that aligns with your capacity). Lifting weight will break down your muscles. However — and this is where the magic happens — when the muscles grow back, they grow back stronger, but only if you are subjecting them to progressive overload.


In summary, Kuhn demonstrated substantial evidence in randomized clinical trials that exercise is effective for treating individuals with RCIS, thereby supporting its use in clinical practice. However, as Kuhn indicated, detail related to which specific exercises are best to prescribe is lacking. Thus, it might be premature to label this exercise protocol as a criterion standard based on current available evidence. In addition, the multifactored nature of RCIS indicates that individuals do not present with a homogeneous list of impairments. Therefore, we believe that using the same exercise program to treat everyone who has RCIS is inappropriate. An effective exercise program is derived not only from the pathoanatomic diagnosis but also from the synthesis of factors, such as pain, impairments, and functional limitations. Furthermore, we believe follow-up examinations might be necessary to modify and progress the individual's exercise program. Development of a classification-based treatment approach using evidence-based exercises with standardized exercise dosage and progression guidelines might optimize outcomes for individuals with RCIS.
Do you have any health or physical limitations to consider? If you have back problems, knee issues, arthritis, high blood pressure, asthma, or any kind of health or physical limitations, you need to consider these when looking at the array of exercise videos on the market. There are some that will push you to the very edges of your limits and others that can accommodate a necessity for lower impact and a slower pace yet are still effective. Ignoring health problems or physical limitations is very dangerous. Asking your doctor for any restrictions before shopping is a plus as well.
Physiological, psychological and EMG responses to the time to exhaustion tests are presented Figs 4 and 5. Leg RPE (Fig 4A), leg muscle pain (Fig 4B) and heart rate (HR, Fig 4C) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Cadence during the time to exhaustion decreased over time (P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for these aforementioned parameters are presented Fig 5. EMG RMS of the VL (Fig 5A), VM (Fig 5B), RF (Fig 5C) and the sum of these muscles (Fig 5D) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for EMG parameters are presented Fig 5. Blood lactate concentration increased (from 1.3 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and blood glucose concentration decreased (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 4.4 ± 0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.001) over time.
Rock climbing is one of the most physically challenging sports, testing strength, endurance, flexibility, and stamina. To improve in the sport, climbers must build and maintain each of these assets. Written by veteran climber and performance coach, Eric Hörst, The Rock Climber's Exercise Guide provides climbers of all ages and experience with the knowledge and tools to design and follow a comprehensive, personalized exercise program. Enhance your skills, maximize your potential, and become the best climber you can be!

The Pull-up is performed by hanging from a chin-up bar above head height with the palms facing forward (supinated) and pulling the body up so the chin reaches or passes the bar. The pull-up is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. A chin-up (palms facing backwards) places more emphasis on the biceps and a wide grip pullup places more emphasis on the lats. As beginners of this exercise are often unable to lift their own bodyweight, a chin-up machine can be used with counterweights to assist them in the lift.
14.  If you don't feel like working out, don't! Listen to your body. Just because it's your "scheduled day" doesn't mean you must work out. If your body is taking a little longer to recover than usual, so be it. It won't hurt you to lay off for an additional day or two; you will not lose anything you've gained. If your body isn't ready, it's better to skip days than to work out anyway. Every seven days is only a target (some people have found every eight or nine days reap the same benefits).
That chronic office slump is a sign that your abs are snoozing; just look at your belly. "Posture is underrated and underutilized when it comes to working our abs," Richey says. His trick: Draw your belly button in as you lift your pelvic floor, as if you were doing a Kegel, to coax your core muscles to start firing together. "Soon, you won't have to consciously think about it," he says. You can do this belly button–pelvic floor "link" several times throughout the day (holding for up to 30 seconds each time) as you're sitting at your desk, in the car, or waiting in line somewhere. (Take the next step in straightening up by tackling this posture workout.)
The MMB exercises are not pathology orientated or sport specific, rather all exercises are recommended for everybody, whether they are injured, healthy, or a competitive athlete; the ability to perform the exercises represents the normal. The exercises and sequence do not change, besides the difficulty levels which are adjusted according to the individual level of practice. The MMB progressions occur when the exercises become easier and eventually autonomous and harmonious, ensuring the short- and long-term benefits of practice. Harmonious breathing and relaxation techniques are employed in every exercise repetition. Furthermore, there is the recommendation to train daily in relaxed environments, with abundant fresh air and appropriate sunlight levels and to bath regularly. Studio training is recommended for beginners, people with ailments or performing athletes.
Although there is research concluding the effectiveness of the Alfredson protocol, some individuals find the completion of 180 repetitions of exercise daily to be difficult to achieve.  A study in the February 2014 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy indicated that a modified version of the Alfredson protocol with a "do as much as tolerated" approach achieved similar positive results as the full 180 repetition protocol.
Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.
Zumba Fitness-Concert Live. Ever been to a concert and just danced around with abandon? This Zumba video is the next best thing and it’ll count as a workout! In addition to the cardio burn, you’ll feel all the electricity from the crowd during this 70-minute latin dance workout. The video features 16 high-energy, calorie-blasting routines that you can do all at once, or pause and break up into intervals.
When intensity is high, it is physiologically impossible to work out for a long time. Doing more exercise than is minimally necessary to stimulate adaptive changes (or to maintain a proper level of fitness) drains bodily resources and compromises recovery. A properly performed workout should take no longer than 45 minutes, which if done in a gym can also include some time spent on a treadmill at the end of the workout.
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