When performed at high intensity until exhaustion, OLDE has been shown to induce both peripheral and central fatigue [11, 17, 18]. However, as the exercise performed in these studies did not take place on the same ergometer where neuromuscular function was tested, the extent of peripheral and central fatigue remained unclear. To avoid the need to transfer the participant from the exercising ergometer to the dynamometer (to assess muscle fatigue), we recently developed in our laboratory a OLDE protocol on a dynamometer, reducing the time delay between cessation of the exercise and start of neuromuscular testing [8]. In this study, we demonstrated that both peripheral and central fatigue significantly recovered between exhaustion and after three minutes, but also that high intensity OLDE alters cortical and spinal excitability. Previous studies [8, 11, 17, 18] describing muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE focused only on isometric muscle fatigue (i.e. muscle fatigue measured during isometric contractions) and did not describe the extent of isokinetic muscle fatigue (i.e. muscle fatigue measured during isokinetic contractions) and its recovery. Consequently, an additional aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery induced by high intensity OLDE.
Bottom line. Muscle confusion is a snappy term for non-linear periodization, which simply means rotating the workouts you do so that your muscles are constantly challenged and you get better, faster toning and weight-loss results. Research suggests this approach is more effective than doing the same exercise routine. P90X is a 90-day plan that combines strength moves, cardio, and yoga­—and if you follow it faithfully, you will probably see results. But it’s suitable only for those who are already very fit because the routines are intense and take about an hour a day. Note: You’ll also need dumbbells, exercise bands, and a pull-up bar, which do not come with the basic system. The diet is complicated, but it provides an appropriate number of calories for the work you’ll be doing.
In 1912, John Shields Fairbairn, a leading consultant obstetrician at St Thomas Maternity Hospital, London, started a program to revolutionize the medical approach to child delivery.22 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004. [Google Scholar] This aimed to replace the 19th century medical practice of heavily medicating women during labor and the common use of force to deliver. To implement his vision of providing pregnant women with education and natural physical health for childbirth and recovery, Fairbairn chose Midwife and Physiotherapist Minnie Randell (1875–1974) to lead the newly founded St Thomas School of Physiotherapy, which served as the project’s education and training center.22,23 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
Aerobic exercise, which speeds up your heart rate and breathing, is important for many body functions. It gives your heart and lungs a workout and increases endurance. "If you're too winded to walk up a flight of stairs, that's a good indicator that you need more aerobic exercise to help condition your heart and lungs, and get enough blood to your muscles to help them work efficiently," says Wilson.
The positive trend shown here is an encouraging result in this population in relation to the possibility of increasing their ability in performing daily activities, reducing the occurrence of falls and potential femoral fractures. Further research is needed to understand how to design a vigorous exercise protocol, which may focus not only on aerobics but also on the different skills assessed by the SFT and which may include specific training sessions to enhance those particular skills, such as 8-foot up and go test. To maximize the functional/physical capacities of those over 65, a close link between high-intensity exercise and functional exercises is required. A mixed circuit training program including both kinds of the aforementioned exercises and measurable by SFT should be followed.
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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