While the focus of Pilates is strength training, you'll get some cardio in with moves like this. Stand with your belly pulled in and your arms overhead. Inhale and lower your head, bending the knees and swinging the arms back. Exhale and jump up with straight legs, reaching the arms overhead. Land with the knees slightly bent and return quickly to starting position. Do 8-10 reps at a rapid pace. You should be out of breath when you finish.
Evidence from HIIT studies conducted under controlled laboratory conditions has provided proof-of-concept of efficacy [9]. However, it has been argued that HIIT has high efficacy but low effectiveness [16], and long-term exercise interventions carried out under free-living conditions have been asked for to investigate whether HIIT is feasible as a public health initiative among older adults [9, 16]. Our data showed that both training groups reported on average more than two exercise sessions per week throughout the year. Approximately 60% of the sessions in the HIIT group were performed with a self-reported high-intensity (≥15 Borg scale), indicating that older adults are able to perform HIIT over a long time-period without strict supervision. However, women had a lower proportion of sessions with high-intensity exercise compared to men. This result is in line with previous findings that women (aged 60–67 years) are less likely than men to prefer vigorous physical activity [23].

All six MMB pioneers expected near magical effects from the regular non-exhausting practice of their exercise regimes. This promised a lifetime of optimal health, beauty, and strength for the body and mind. Further, expected benefits include improved quality and efficacy of daily activities, looking and feeling good, making life itself easier and more pleasurable with a disappearance or reduction of symptoms while improving postures. This leads to increased self-esteem, reduced health costs, and the expectation of a longer and high-quality life. It is interesting to note that all six MMB pioneers enjoyed long and fruitful lives that reflect this philosophical model within real life examples: Checkley died in 1925 at 78; Müller in 1938 at 72; Alexander in 1955 at 86; Randell in 1974 at 99; Pilates in 1967 at 87; and Morris in 1980 at 89.


EMG of the Vastus Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris (RF), Vastus Medialis (VM) and Biceps Femoris was recorded with pairs of silver chloride circular (recording diameter of 10 mm) surface electrodes (Swaromed, Nessler Medizintechnik, ref 1066, Innsbruck, Austria) with an interelectrode (center-to-center) distance of 20 mm. Recording sites (belly of each muscle, as distal as possible from the hips when the subject was asked to contract his quadriceps at a knee angle of 10 deg) were then carefully adjusted at the beginning of each testing session (electrode placement was drawn on the skin with permanent marker to ensure reproducibility of the recording site). Low resistance between the two electrodes (< 5 kΩ) was obtained by shaving the skin, and dirt was removed from the skin using alcohol swabs. The reference electrode was attached to the patella of the right knee. Myoelectrical signals were amplified with a bandwidth frequency ranging from 10 Hz to 500 Hz (gain: VL = 500; RF and VM = 1000), digitized on-line at a sampling frequency of 2 kHz using a computer, and stored for analysis with commercially available software (Acqknowledge 4.2 for MP Systems, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA). Due to the pressure of the thigh on the dynamometer chair, the Biceps Femoris EMG signal quality was impaired (e.g. numerous artefacts, problems with electrodes) and therefore not analyzed.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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