Jump up ^ Linke SE, Ussher M (2015). "Exercise-based treatments for substance use disorders: evidence, theory, and practicality". Am J Drug Alcohol Abuse. 41 (1): 7–15. doi:10.3109/00952990.2014.976708. PMC 4831948. PMID 25397661. The limited research conducted suggests that exercise may be an effective adjunctive treatment for SUDs. In contrast to the scarce intervention trials to date, a relative abundance of literature on the theoretical and practical reasons supporting the investigation of this topic has been published. ... numerous theoretical and practical reasons support exercise-based treatments for SUDs, including psychological, behavioral, neurobiological, nearly universal safety profile, and overall positive health effects.
Strength conditioning. Start by doing one set of exercises targeting each of the major muscle groups. Bryant suggests using a weight at which you can comfortably perform the exercise eight to 12 times in a set. When you think you can handle more, gradually increase either the weight, the number of repetitions, or number of sets. To maximize the benefits, do strength training at least twice a week. Never work the same body part two days in a row.

This is also the point at which exercise becomes more critical. Bone and muscle mass peak at the end of your 20s. Unchecked, sarcopenia, or muscle loss, can claim up to 50 percent of an inactive adult’s muscle tissue by the time he or she reaches 70, according to a 2014 Johns Hopkins University study. Your VO2 max — a measure of how much oxygen your body can process — declines similarly, dropping about 10 percent per decade after around age 30 in healthy sedentary adults of both sexes.
Degenhardt B [Internet]. Once upon a time: the evolution of Pilates mat work. 2012 Nov 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://benjamindegenhardt.com/once-upon-a-time/.  He was later moved to the Isle of Man where he had duties training the injured inmates in their wards. It was there that Pilates started to connect springs to the hospital bed frames modifying them into effective and comfortable exercise devices which later evolved to become modern Pilates equipment.43 Hessel J [Internet]. Joseph H. Pilates biography. 2015 Jul 8 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.jillianhessel.com/pilates_biography.html. [Google Scholar]
The results of this study present evidence in favor of this high intensity OLDE protocol to investigate muscle fatigue and muscle endurance. Indeed, this new protocol developed in our laboratory i) presents a lower variability than other high intensity time to exhaustion tests [20], ii) is not limited by the cardiorespiratory system and iii) allows a quick start of neuromuscular testing to fully appreciate the extent of muscle fatigue induced by the exercise. Therefore, it can provide an interesting tool to isolate the cardiorespiratory and neuromuscular effects of various manipulations supposed to play a role in muscle fatigue and performance during high intensity dynamic endurance exercise (e.g. spinal blockade of afferent feedback from the working muscles).

I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.
Trainer Sara Haley loves 30 seconds a day of a core building exercise called resistance fight, which is especially great for those who’ve had children. “Lie on your back and lift one leg up to tabletop so that your knee is in line with your hip. Take your opposite hand and push against your thigh,” she says. “As you try to push your leg away with your hand, resist by pushing your leg into your hand in opposition. While all this is happening, you should be focusing on pulling your navel towards your spine and closing your rib cage. You may feel your body start to shake.” Be sure to hold for 15 seconds on each side. If your ears perked up at the mention of this being a great move for moms, then make sure you also look out for your kiddos with our report on 13 Scary Ingredients in Your Kid’s Lunch Box, Exposed!.
Pull-ups have become the quintessential move to any CrossFit workout. HOW TO DO IT: To complete a pull-up, start by hanging from a secured bar with your hands in an overhand grip (palm pointing outward, away from your body) and slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. While squeezing your traps together and engaging your abs, pull yourself up to the bar so that your chin passes over. MUSCLES USED: Back, core, shoulders and chest.

Seven minutes of exercise per day a few times a week though isn’t a magical elixir that will give you a bikini-ready body in a few weeks. Michelle Golla, of Denver-based Boost 180 Fitness, says, “it's important not to set unrealistic expectations for a 7-minute workout. It will not completely transform your body, but it is a great way to get your heart pumping and burn calories all day long when you're pressed for time.”  
By 1925, Margaret Morris had already integrated remedial exercises within her newly established dance school, Margaret Morris Movement (MMM). Her philosophy claimed that natural dance moves should be healthy and constructive for the body and mind, rather than the deleterious moves dancers were expected to practice and perform at the time. Morris saw the connections between breathing, stamina, range of motion, posture, health, vitality, and how these freed the body to dance and the mind to be creative.49 Morris M. My life in movement. London: Peter Owen Publishers; 1969. [Google Scholar] This philosophy extended itself to the use of natural dance moves as remedial exercises and a healthy active lifestyle. During 1925 and 1926, Morris presented her method to doctors and midwifes in England, France, and Switzerland, among them the St Thomas team. As a result of this meeting, Morris enrolled to study physiotherapy under Randell and graduated in 1933 with distinction.30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar] Throughout her decade of collaboration with Randell and the St Thomas Project, Morris continued to educate and run MMM with great appreciation from top-tier dancers, students, and artistic critiques. By 1939, her teachers developed movement education and dance centers in 10 countries, most still active today (Figures 7–9).30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar]
The second aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Firstly, the absence of isometric KF MVC torque decrease confirms that our exercise only solicits the knee extensors and does not involve the knee flexors. Secondly, EMG RMS measured during KE MVCs shortly after exhaustion and during the recovery period was not altered by high intensity OLDE, confirming the results of a previous study [8]. Therefore, as a decrease in knee extensors force production capacity can be observed without concomitant changes in EMG signal, our data combined with the data of a previous study [8] suggest that EMG signal cannot be used to investigate dynamic exercise-induced muscle fatigue. The lack of changes in EMG signal is likely to be caused by a potentiation of the maximal evoked muscular wave (M-wave) induced by high intensity OLDE [8]. Finally, according to our hypothesis, isokinetic KE MVC torque quickly recovered and plateaued after exhaustion (within ~ 30 s at 60 and 100 deg/s, and within ~ 50 s at 140 deg/s). This quick recovery in torque production capacity is likely to be associated with recovery in both central and peripheral fatigue. This assumption is supported by one previous study in our laboratory demonstrating that not only peripheral and central fatigue, but also cortical and spinal excitability recovered shortly after exhaustion [8]. Froyd et al. [32] also demonstrated a significant recovery in skeletal muscle function within 1–2 minutes after completion of a one-leg isokinetic time trial performed at high intensity. Taking all together, these results demonstrate that to fully appreciate the extent of neuromuscular alterations induced by high intensity dynamic exercise, assessment of muscle fatigue must be performed within 30 s of cessation of the exercise.
Your muscles perform several functions during isotonic exercise. They push, pull, bend and straighten. For instance, when you bend your arm at the elbow to perform a bicep curl, you flex your bicep. When you unbend your arm at the elbow to perform a triceps kickback, you extend your triceps. When you lie on your back and push a weight up from your chest, you extend your pectoral muscles. When you perform a pull up, you flex your back muscles. Muscles that perform opposite functions of the same region (such as biceps and triceps flexing and extending the arm) are called complimentary muscle groups. When performing isotonic exercises, it is important to balance exercises between complimentary muscle groups in order to prevent injury and develop balanced strength throughout your body.
“I always tell people that you want to learn why you’re doing something—knowing a bunch of moves doesn’t matter as much when don’t you know how to implement them,” explains Cori Lefkowith, Orange County-based personal trainer and founder of Redefining Strength. So even if you’ve got planks and push-ups down, understanding what’s really going on while you’re training can help you reach your goals faster. We’ve decoded 25 common fitness terms for you so that you can work out with confidence and get the most out of your fitness routine.

Dietary nitrate supplementation increases circulating nitrite concentration, and the subsequent reduction of nitrite to nitric oxide is promoted in hypoxic environments. Given that PO2 is lower in Type II compared with Type I muscle, this article examines the hypothesis that the ergogenicity of nitrate supplementation is linked to specific effects on vascular, metabolic, and contractile function in Type II muscle.
We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.
The world population is ageing and the number of older adults with chronic health conditions and physical limitations is expected to increase. This, in turn, could lead to an increased burden on healthcare services [1]. Regular physical activity is an important component of successful ageing and reduces the risk of developing several age- and lifestyle related diseases such as cardiovascular disease, dementia and type 2 diabetes [2–7]. However, making older adults exercise and keeping them in exercise programs is a major challenge [8]. Understanding how older adults prefer to exercise may help developing tailored exercise programs and increase sustained exercise participation in ageing populations.
Torque signal and knee angle signal were recorded using the same dynamometer as for the OLDE (Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer, CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). During the tests a two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Torque signal and knee angle signal were digitized on-line at a sampling frequency of 1 kHz using a computer, and stored for analysis with commercially available software. Torque signal was filtered prior to data analysis (Butterworth low-pass filter at 100 Hz). Torque signal, knee angle signal and EMG signal were recorded with the same device (MP150, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA) and analyzed with the same commercially available software (Acqknowledge 4.2 for MP Systems, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA).
Jump up ^ Magnoni, L. J; Crespo, D; Ibarz, A; Blasco, J; Fernández-Borràs, J; Planas, J. V (2013). "Effects of sustained swimming on the red and white muscle transcriptome of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a carbohydrate-rich diet". Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology. 166 (3): 510–21. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.08.005. PMID 23968867.
Your body has that whole breathing thing on lock, but there's more than one way to inhale and exhale and some require extra work from the abs. "Kapalabhati breathing engages the transverse abdominis to push out the breath," says Allison Candelaria, owner of Soul Yoga in Oklahoma City. Here's how to do it: Sit tall, then strongly and quickly pull your navel toward your spine. Then release your ab muscles, forcing you to exhale. Work up to doing that 20 times, inhaling and letting your belly expand between each "pump." (This belly bonfire breathing technique can also help you fire up your body anywhere, anytime.)
Recruiting lasted 6 months starting from September 2013. Participants were recruited by means of family doctors to whom the goal of the study was explained. The recruitment flow chart is shown in Figure 1. Three hundred and fifty people aged ≥ 65 were invited to participate. Of these, 51.4% agreed to be included in the screening list while 48.6% refused to participate, mainly for family reasons such as illness/hospitalization/old age of a family member. Forty people were found eligible to participate in the research protocol. Randomly, twenty were assigned to VE and twenty to the control group. The latter were instructed not to take part in any physical activity throughout the study period. All the selected participants signed an informed consent. The study was performed according to the Declaration of Helsinki and approved by the local ethics committee on September 23, 2013.
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