Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet hip-width apart. Place arms at your side and lift up the spine and hips. Only the head, feet, arms, and shoulders should be on the ground. Then lift one leg upwards, keeping the core tight. Slowly bring the leg back down, then lift back up. Try to do 10 reps per leg, then bring the knee in place and spine back on the floor.
The European Commission - DG EAC - Directorate General for Education and Culture - has dedicated programs and funds for HEPA - Health Enhancing Physical Activity projects[134] within its Horizon 2020 and Erasmus+ program, as research showed that too many Europeans are not physically active enough. Financing is available for increased collaboration between players active in this field across the EU and around the world, the promotion of HEPA in the EU and its partner countries and the European Sports Week. The DG EAC regularly publishes a Eurobarometer on sport and physical activity.
Natural movement-harmonizing exercises and stretches have likely been practiced since the beginning of mankind. Forms of non-strenuous rhythmical functional movements were used for three main purposes: To manage and prevent musculoskeletal disorders, to maintain a naturally healthy body and mind, and to enhance athletic performance. Around the turn of the 20th century, at least six independent Western modern mind–body (MMB) methods emerged simultaneously. This phenomenon occurred during the same era in which Einstein, Picasso, Freud, and Stravinsky also broke away from dominating and restrictive establishment controls, subsequently freeing their fields. The cultural changes and personal emancipation that MMB pioneers brought to the exercise world were no less dramatic, yet significantly less documented.
The goal in training competitive athletes is to provide training loads that are effective in improving performance. At some stages during the training process, athletes may experience an unexplainable decrease in performance. This might happen when prolonged excessive training takes place concurrent with other stressors and insufficient recovery. This unexplainable performance decrements can result in chronic maladaptations that can lead to the overtraining syndrome (OTS). A keyword in the recognition of OTS might be “prolonged maladaptation” not only of the athletic performance but also of several biological, neurochemical and hormonal regulation mechanisms. When athletes deliberately use a short-term period (eg, training camp) to increase training load, they can experience short-term performance decrement, without severe psychological or lasting other negative symptoms.1 2 This functional over reaching (FO) will eventually lead to an improvement in performance after recovery. However, when athletes do not sufficiently respect the balance between training and recovery, non-functional over-reaching (NFO) can occur.1 2 At this stage, the first signs and symptoms of prolonged maladaptation such as performance decrements, psychological disturbance (decreased vigour, increased fatigue) and hormonal disturbances are present, and the athlete will need weeks or months to recover. The distinction between NFO and OTS is very difficult and will depend on the clinical outcome and exclusion diagnosis.
Exclusion criteria included major diseases or conditions such as severe heart disease, uncontrolled hypertension, obesity, osteoarticular pathology, and neurological disease. Criteria were evaluated on the basis of clinical history, resting ECG, and physical examination. Participants maintained their lifestyles and were instructed not to take part in any other physical programs throughout the study. At the time of the initial design, the study consisted of a 12-week randomized controlled trial with a frequency of 3 times a week, 36 sessions in all, ending with a new assessment of their wellness and the potential persistence of the results on functional/physical capacities.
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