Alternatively, anaerobic means an “absence of free oxygen.” It’s any form of high-intensity exercise that leaves you winded relatively quickly. A well developed aerobic system can produce energy for a long time, while your anaerobic capabilities cease anywhere from 10–120 seconds. Weightlifting, sprinting, plyometrics and HIIT are examples of anaerobic exercise. Explosiveness and an ability to generate power and or speed in small bursts is a trait of athletes that require anaerobic capabilities. Interestingly, the more developed your aerobic system, the longer it takes to burn through your anaerobic system. In this respect, you can think of aerobic exercise as a building block for anaerobic capacity.
EMG RMS was measured for the following muscles: Vastus Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris (RF), Vastus Medialis (VM) and the overall knee extensors (KE; sum of VL, RF and VM). Data are presented as main effect of time and mean (SE). * significantly different from 10% and $ significantly different from 100%, 1 item for P < 0.05, 2 items for P < 0.01 and 3 items for P < 0.001.
Our system uses specific diaphragmatic breathing exercises along with proper core engagement through isometric holds, co-contractions with bigger muscle groups and muscle control to keep the abdominal muscles strong as the belly grows throughout pregnancy, rehabs post baby and even gains the strength required to prepare the body for pregnancy. All of our breathing and core activation techniques are providing women with a connection to their core that they have never experienced, whether pre-pregnancy, currently pregnancy, or post pregnancy. During the postpartum phase, we continue our focus on the deep core to heal abdominal separation, re-connect the muscles postpartum & help you build a strong foundation in your core for life. Our techniques are paving the way in healing (diastasis recti), incontinence, hernias, etc. while teaching our mamas that pregnancy doesn’t have to leave you feeling broken.

Torque signal and knee angle signal were recorded using the same dynamometer as for the OLDE (Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer, CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). During the tests a two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Torque signal and knee angle signal were digitized on-line at a sampling frequency of 1 kHz using a computer, and stored for analysis with commercially available software. Torque signal was filtered prior to data analysis (Butterworth low-pass filter at 100 Hz). Torque signal, knee angle signal and EMG signal were recorded with the same device (MP150, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA) and analyzed with the same commercially available software (Acqknowledge 4.2 for MP Systems, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA).
Two incremental graded exercise tests until exhaustion were performed, with 4 h of rest in between. One hour before each test, the athletes received a standardised meal (2315 kJ, 73% carbohydrate, 19% protein, 8% fat). Athletes arrived in the laboratory at 07:00 after an overnight fast. The first blood sample was collected as they arrived. Immediately after the first exercise test, the second blood sample was drawn. The third and fourth blood samples were drawn before and immediately after the second test. A schematic overview of the protocol can be found in fig 1. Because it is known that venepuncture increases blood prolactin, going back to baseline within 30 min, blood was drawn before and after each test (four punctures) creating the same “stress” in each situation. The study protocol was approved by the university ethical committee.
(2) Active Phase (between 60% and 84% HRR). Continuous dynamic and interval training mode exercise involving large muscle activities with an increasing level of difficulty and intensity. Subjects began with a short walk, alternated with various step exercises (e.g., both side and forward-backward step up and down on the platform, with alternate footsteps). Then, they went on performing alternate upper-limb lifts (while keeping inferior limbs flexed) and lower limb flexions and extensions (knee lifts, both side and forward-backward leg lifts, and leg curls), as a sort of brief and easy sequence to be repeated for a fixed time. Integrated multiple plane exercises for upper and lower limbs using elastic resistances (Xertube®) completed the last part of the Active Phase. To reach the goal of gradually augmenting the intensity of the program, the coach continuously checked the HRR level of subjects who were progressively increasing the duration and the number of exercises. The resistance of the elastic bands was also increased by one level (from very light to medium) every 4 weeks.
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