Many exercise videos will make unrealistic guarantees in terms of the results you can expect to see. Beware of these because they can set you up for a real disappointment. A good example of this is a program that claims you can get “ripped” in 30 days. Well, this might be true IF you are only toning up and don’t have weight to lose. For anyone who has got pounds to lose, they finish the 30 days and are still not “ripped” because those claims did not apply to anyone who has weight to lose.


The OLDE protocol and neuromuscular function tests were performed on a Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer (CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). The axis of the dynamometer was aligned with the knee axis, and the lever arm was attached to the shank with a strap. Two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Full description of the OLDE protocol can be found in Pageaux et al. [8]. Briefly, this protocol allows isolating the knee extensor muscles during a dynamic exercise involving an active isotonic knee extension (from 10 deg to 90 deg, 0 deg = knee fully extended) and a passive knee flexion. The passive flexion angular velocity was set up at 300 deg/s automatically cushioned by the dynamometer for safety purposes. Due to this cushion, the passive knee flexion angular velocity was ~ 180 deg/s. According to a previous study [8], a cadence of 50 contractions per minute (cpm) was chosen (knee extension angular velocity ~ 106°/s). Subjects maintained a cadence of 50 cpm at all visits via the use of a metronome. Power output produced by the subject was controlled according to the formula:
Dewayne Riggins, celebrity trainer and Founder and CEO of Inspirational Fitness, says you can work your quads and glutes with reverse lunges—30 seconds on each leg. How to do them: Stand in an upright position and then step back with one leg; bend knees as low as you can. Drop your back knee to one inch off the ground or as low as you can and be sure front knee is not leaning over the foot. Repeat with the other leg.

Why do we exercise? We all know it's good for our health, but have you ever thought about it?  Do you exercise the way you do because you've heard that's the way it should be done? Is it possible that the current way of working out could be good for some parts of our body, but bad for others... are we doing more harm than good? Are we spending more time exercising than we need to?
Remember Billy Blanks, the guy behind the Tae Bo craze? Now his son, Billy Blanks, Jr. is getting in on the family business too. Along with his wife, Sharon Catherine Blanks, Billy Jr. will help you learn various types of dance styles in this fun-packed DVD. The duo takes you through six 5-minute cardio workouts utilizing dance styles from all over the world: hip-hop, Bollywood, African, disco, country, and "old-school" cardio. It's designed for the whole family so kids can join in too!
How to: Facing down, place your hands slightly wider than shoulder-width apart. Place your toes on the floor. If that's too hard, start with your knees on the floor. Your body should make a straight line from shoulders to knees or feet. Keep your rear-end muscles and abs engaged. Bend your elbows to lower down until you almost touch the floor. Lift back up by pushing through your elbows, Keep your torso in a straight line throughout the move.
Aerobic exercise, which speeds up your heart rate and breathing, is important for many body functions. It gives your heart and lungs a workout and increases endurance. "If you're too winded to walk up a flight of stairs, that's a good indicator that you need more aerobic exercise to help condition your heart and lungs, and get enough blood to your muscles to help them work efficiently," says Wilson.
Description. The patient put one hand over the same shoulder with the palm touching the back and reached down the back. He/she placed the other hand up the back from the waist with the palm facing outwards. Pointing the middle fingers of each hand towards each other, patient tried to touch the fingers of each hand in the middle of the back. The number of inches (centimeters) between the extended middle fingers was measured. The test was always done with the right hand over the shoulder and the left behind the back.
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