If you've been to yoga before, you'll recognize this as a near chaturanga—but a little faster. Start in a down dog position with hands on the ground, hips high in the air, and feet on the ground so you form a triangle shape. In a fluid motion, dive head toward the floor, coming into a low push-up position, and then swoop chest forward and up so you end in an upward dog position. From there, push hips up to return to starting position.
Athletic trainers and physical therapists play important roles in the management of individuals with RCIS. When caring for this patient population, an athletic trainer or physical therapist performs a comprehensive initial examination. Information obtained from the examination is used, in part, to (1) identify impairments believed to be contributing to the individual's pain and functional limitations and (2) develop an impairment-based rehabilitation program. We believe that the prescription of specific evidence-based interventions designed to address the relevant contributory factors might be more appropriate than administering the same exercise program to everyone with RCIS. Ideally, individuals with RCIS would be classified into impairment-based subgroups and prescribed interventions specific to that subgroup. Although no treatment classification for patients with RCIS exists, this approach has been used to treat individuals with low back pain and has resulted in superior outcomes when compared with a general treatment approach.2
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
×