LSR, SBS, HV, NPA, JEI, UW and DS contributed to the conception and design of the study. LSR, SBS, HV and DS were responsible for the collection of the Generation 100 data in cooperation with colleagues at the Cardiac Exercise Research Group at the Norwegian University of Science and Technology, Norway. LSR, SBS and XT provided the data for analysis. LSR undertook the data analysis and drafted the manuscript. All authors provided critical insight and revisions to the manuscript. All authors read and approved the final version of the manuscript submitted for publication.

The study that kicked off this whole seven-minute workout fad four years ago notes that the secret-sauce is to strategically work different major muscles groups (upper body, lower body, core) each time you do the workout. This allows for one major muscle group to rest while you work the next muscle group, resulting in a super-efficient, super-effective routine.


In 1988, Richard Simmons released his popular exercise video, Sweatin' to the Oldies, consisting of energy-packed workouts set to music by a live band. In his workouts, Simmons is so lively and enthusiastic that the workout seems less about grueling exercise and more about jovial fun. This is still the case for Simmons—as he said in a 2012 interview with the Chicago Tribune, " I try to be the clown and court jester and make people laugh. At the same time, you have people in the hospital who have had gastric bypass or lap-band surgery and they still have to work out." While Simmons's workouts have been successful, he takes a different approach than that of Fonda by not grouping any given set of his exercises with any one muscle group. You may not know what specific part of your body you're working out, but boy, you still feel it.


The exercises developed by Checkley, Müller, Randell, Alexander, Pilates, and Morris were secular in nature. The holistic unity between harmonious movements and beauty, health, performance and youth, between the body and mind, and between human and nature were all emphasized yet these universal concepts were unimpeded by religious, political, or commercial influences. The exercises were simply harmonious functional human movements learned from observations of nature.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.3 Perspectives for Progress “Physical Activity as Cause and Cure of Muscular Pain: Evidence of Underlying Mechanisms” from authors Karen Søgaard and Gisela Sjøgaard. Work-related physical activity (PA), in terms of peak loads and sustained and/or repetitive contractions, presents risk factors for the development of muscular pain and disorders. However, PA as a training tailored to the employee’s work exposure, health, and physical capacity offers prevention and rehabilitation. We suggest the concept of “Intelligent Physical Exercise Training” relying on evidence-based sports science training principles.

The baseline characteristics of the study participants are presented in Table 1. No differences between the training groups existed at study entry. In both groups, men spent more hours in sedentary behavior and had significantly higher weight, height, and VO2peak compared to women. Contrary, more women than men performed at least 30 min of daily physical activity (Table 1). The included participants had higher VO2peak (11%) compared to those with no exercise logs. They also had higher VO2peak (17%) and height (1.7%) compared to dropouts, but a lower BMI (3.7%) (p < 0.05). A higher proportion of the included participants performed 30 min of daily physical activity compared to the dropouts (77.3% vs. 66.1%, p < 0.05).


You’ve been cleared to exercise but now what? Don’t worry, we’ve got you covered. Our expert guidance will provide you with the foundational strength needed to get you feeling like yourself again while adding an angle of rehabilitative care to re-connect, heal, & re-strengthen your postpartum body. We will safely progress you through exercises that are meant to challenge your body and stimulate your mind while gearing you up to be the strong mom you’re aiming to be. We guarantee that with our training, your fitness regimen will be more effective than ever before.

Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
One new exercise is added to each bodypart routine to provide even more angles from which to train your target muscles to promote complete development. You’ll hit each muscle group with two exercises of 3­–4 sets each: four sets for large bodyparts (chest, back, shoulders, quads, hamstrings) and three sets for smaller bodyparts (biceps, triceps, abs, calves). The result is 16 total sets for the week for large bodyparts and 12 sets total for smaller ones—again, working in the 8–15-rep range—which is a substantial increase in volume from Week 1.
Since almost any exercise requires some strength and some level of aerobic fitness, I recommend a training program that is a mix of both strength training and conditioning; similar to what I do but on a smaller scale (to start). The Stronglifts 5x5 workout that I mentioned above is an excellent place to start and requires only three days a week. Assuming you can exercise five days a week, you can do some aerobic/anaerobic work on Tuesdays and Thursdays. If five days a week is too much, start with a three-day strength workout. If you also want to do conditioning, you can choose to perform it after your strength routine for 10–30 minutes, or just shift your focus after a few weeks of strength training and do conditioning only for a week or two.
Absolute values for KE MVC torques and maximal EMG RMS are presented Table 3. As EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 60 deg/s pre-exercise values significantly differ between sessions, these data were not analyzed. Planned comparisons to explore main effect of time are presented Table 3. Despite a significant main effect of time for the EMG RMS of the RF muscle at 140 deg/s, planned comparison failed to demonstrate a significant difference between times. Changes in KE MVC torque and KE EMG RMS related to baseline are presented Figs 6 and 7. Isometric KF MVC torque did not change over time (75 ± 31 to 73 ± 27 N·m, P = 0.368).
A Polar (www.polar.fi) heart rate monitor (belt and watch) is used to measure heart rate continuously. A transmitter belt is fastened around the chest while the watch is held by a nearby observer. If at any time during the experiment the heart rate exceeds the predetermined ceiling (85% of age-predicted max heart rate) the experiment should be stopped immediately.
In 1904, Danish prize-winning athlete and gymnastics educator JP Müller followed Checkley’s exercise philosophy with the publication of ‘My System’. This book described how the relatively healthy, average person could keep fit, fortify health and stamina, and increase physical and mental efficiency with 15 min of daily exercise. He claimed: ‘If people only knew how much more, how much better and how much longer they can enjoy life, instead of being controlled by a weakly body, they have a strong and healthy one at their command!’15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Müller was born a weak child and developed an exercise routine to re-build his own body, inspired by the harmony of ancient Greek statues. His routine included exercising natural functional movements, self-massage of skin in fascial lines, exposure to the sun, and bathing in cold water in addition to running on the balls of the feet as an aerobic activity.15,16 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904.
We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.
If you’ve ever skipped a workout because you’re just too sore from a previous one (hey, these videos are tough!), you’re definitely not alone. That’s why we love this easy-to-follow routine. It features exercises that stretch and strengthen your muscles simultaneously so you give your body the chance to recover—without skipping a workout altogether. That’s what we consider a win-win.
Fit septuagenarians may even need to be held back: “Strength training is super empowering,” she says. “And people get excited when they see and feel the results. I have older clients doing multiple timed sets of kettlebell swings. One older client biked 2,700 miles in 50 days. It takes a little longer, but they can reach really impressive levels of fitness.”
Bonds H. The politics of the male body in global sport - the Danish involvement. Oxon: Routledge; 2010.  During the 1920s, the method’s most popular decade, Müller’s books sold by the millions and his exercises were practiced extensively, including Franz Kafka and the Prince of Wales.16,17 Bonds H. The politics of the male body in global sport - the Danish involvement. Oxon: Routledge; 2010.
Children who participate in physical exercise experience greater loss of body fat and increased cardiovascular fitness.[23] Studies have shown that academic stress in youth increases the risk of cardiovascular disease in later years; however, these risks can be greatly decreased with regular physical exercise.[24] There is a dose-response relation between the amount of exercise performed from approximately 700–2000 kcal of energy expenditure per week and all-cause mortality and cardiovascular disease mortality in middle-aged and elderly populations. The greatest potential for reduced mortality is in the sedentary who become moderately active. Studies have shown that since heart disease is the leading cause of death in women, regular exercise in aging women leads to healthier cardiovascular profiles. Most beneficial effects of physical activity on cardiovascular disease mortality can be attained through moderate-intensity activity (40–60% of maximal oxygen uptake, depending on age). Persons who modify their behavior after myocardial infarction to include regular exercise have improved rates of survival. Persons who remain sedentary have the highest risk for all-cause and cardiovascular disease mortality.[25] According to the American Heart Association, exercise reduces the risk of cardiovascular diseases, including heart attack and stroke.[22]

You’re also extremely adaptable, so it’s a great time to explore, play, and learn new physical skills. “Younger people can handle new elements in their workouts every few weeks,” says Anderson, who trains teen athletes as well as octogenarians. Strong bones and muscles, fewer injuries, quick recovery, and naturally high levels of anabolic hormones allow you to make faster progress than at any other point in your life.

A systematic review evaluated 45 studies that examined the relationship between physical activity and cancer survivorship. According to the review, "[there] was consistent evidence from 27 observational studies that physical activity is associated with reduced all-cause, breast cancer–specific, and colon cancer–specific mortality. There is currently insufficient evidence regarding the association between physical activity and mortality for survivors of other cancers."[29] Although there is only limited scientific evidence on the subject, people with cancer cachexia are encouraged to engage in physical exercise.[30] Due to various factors, some individuals with cancer cachexia have a limited capacity for physical exercise.[31][32] Compliance with prescribed exercise is low in individuals with cachexia and clinical trials of exercise in this population often suffer from high drop-out rates.[31][32]
Checkley, Müller, Alexander, and Pilates initiated their interests from a self-requirement to improve health or overcome functional loss. They subsequently used their bodies as a model to demonstrate their method’s effectiveness and encourage others. Despite their turn of the 20th century separation from the gymnasium ‘Physical Culture’ and new independence, all six MMB pioneers advocated their exercises as an adjunct to other sports and regular daily activity; Müller recommended running on the balls of the feet as an aerobic activity, Pilates worked with dancers, while Morris, who besides her dedication to dance and dancers’ health also published ‘Tennis by Simple Exercises’ in 1937 together with French tennis mega-star Suzanne Lenglen.60 Lenglen S, Morris M. Tennis by simple exercises. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar]
I absolutely love your site. I discovered it on Pinterest and as I dug into the workouts and plans I couldn't believe that I hadn't heard of it before! It empowers women with limited resources and time to complete awesome workouts from home with very little equipment ;) thank you! I have already recommended your site to several of my friends and family.
As mentioned earlier, aerobic exercise is primarily characterized by activities that cause the heart to pump at an accelerated pace for an extended period of time. In addition to referring to activities that engages the heart, aerobic exercise refers to physical exercise that either improves or involves the body's oxygen consumption. When cardio exercise is used alongside a healthy diet and anaerobic exercise, it can contribute to a healthy life. Cardio is a particularly good category of exercise to perform in order to shed pounds, as cardio exercise burns fat as a fuel source. Fats, along with oxygen and carbohydrates, together form the fuel source used by all cells: adenosine triphosphate (ATP). For some aerobic exercise routines to get you started, check out this great list and this informative page.
Exclusion criteria included major diseases or conditions such as severe heart disease, uncontrolled hypertension, obesity, osteoarticular pathology, and neurological disease. Criteria were evaluated on the basis of clinical history, resting ECG, and physical examination. Participants maintained their lifestyles and were instructed not to take part in any other physical programs throughout the study. At the time of the initial design, the study consisted of a 12-week randomized controlled trial with a frequency of 3 times a week, 36 sessions in all, ending with a new assessment of their wellness and the potential persistence of the results on functional/physical capacities.
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