One of the beautiful things about yoga is that you can do it anywhere, anytime. (Even in the middle of a desert, as this video proves.) But sometimes you need some instruction to get through an entire sequence. That’s where Tara Stiles comes in. The New York City-based yogi teaches a full flow class in this excellent 50-minute video (one of the best YouTube workouts, in our opinion). Her detailed, easy-to-follow instructions make it seem as though you’re working one-on-one with her, and by the end of it, you’ve had a super solid yoga experience.
In 1982, home workouts came to VHS tape when Jane Fonda released her first exercise video, Jane Fonda's Workout. The video had been inspired by the workout book Fonda had released the previous year, Jane Fonda's Workout Book. After its release, Jane Fonda's Workout gradually became a best-seller after more than 200,000 tapes were sold in one year. The tape was the first of its kind, and is sometimes credited with launching the tape industry. Few people owned VCR players when Fonda released her first tape, but as her exercise tape became increasingly popular among Americans and needed to be watched repeatedly in order to be effective, families were encouraged to buy the necessary hardware to play the tape.

The 1980s also brought the grueling workouts from Buns of Steel with Greg Smithey. In Buns of Steel, Smithey guided viewers in a series of rigorous exercises aimed to tone their rears and thighs. Despite the rigor and intensity of the workout, or perhaps because of it, over one million copies of the VHS tape were sold. That said, I can't help but wonder how much of Smithey's—also called the Bunmaster— success is due to his uncomfortably vivid and surreal line: "Don't forget to squeeze those cheeseburgers out of those thighs!" Wait, what? Smithey comes off as pretty sleazy throughout his tapes, but don't let that stop you. The workout is, after all, titled Buns of Steel.

Doonya describes itself as “your at-home solution for fun dance-fitness!” Bring the energy and dance of Bollywood straight to your living room with this cardio workout. With loads of energy, Doonya co-founders Kajal Desai and Priya Pandya give you a taste of their high-powered dance routines with this four-minute video that’ll leave you sweating in no time. You’ll definitely need some coordination to complete this routine, but it’s great for beginners.

I enjoyed your functional training exercises, but I’m not sure about some of them as I was recently diagnosed with a small tear in my rotator cuff. I’m not planning on having surgery. My doctor said that I could work out, but other than saying not to do straight bar bench presses, he said if it hurts, don’t do it. I would love a little more direction than that. Do you have anything more to offer? Thank you.
Whether you’re a beginning exerciser who needs help getting started or someone who wants to add some spice to your fitness routine, our ACE Exercise Library offers a variety of movements to choose from. Browse through total-body exercises or movements that target more specific areas of the body. Each comes with a detailed description and photos to help ensure proper form.
You really listened to us in the prenatal visit and offered lots of useful ideas which helped us prepare fully for the birth. At the time of labor, you were totally perfect, with helpful words, actions, and emotional support. You were strong and soothing. I really got the birth I had hoped for, but couldn’t imagine I would have. Your support postpartum has been awesome with great breastfeeding tips, recovery advice, and more. ~ Kate, Boulder

Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This… CONTINUE READING


If the proliferation of many websites on the subject (not to mention the co-worker who won't let you forget he does CrossFit, bro) are any indication, the first rule of CrossFit is never stop talking about CrossFit. And while this would seem to encourage certainty about what CrossFit actually is, there are a lot of myths and generalizations to clear up about the workout regimen.
Celebrity fitness instructor Tracy Anderson (clients include Madonna, Gwyneth Paltrow, and Jennifer Lopez) offers six 10-minute, total-body dance workouts in this DVD. The first lesson covers basic steps, while the other workouts have titles like "Cardio Party" and "Sweat Fest." Don't worry if you have two left feet: Even novice dancers can master these moves.
In the fourth and final week of the program, you’ll train four days in a four-way split that hits each bodypart just once (except for calves and abs, which are each trained twice). Four-day splits are common among experienced lifters because they involve training fewer bodyparts (typically 2–3) per workout, which gives each muscle group ample attention and allows you to train with higher volume. As you’ll see, chest and triceps are paired up, as are back with biceps and quads with hamstrings, each a very common pairing among novice and advanced bodybuilders. Shoulders are trained more or less on their own, and you’ll alternate hitting calves and abs—which respond well to being trained multiple times per week—every other workout. No new exercises are introduced in Week 4 so that you can focus on intensity in your workouts instead of learning new movements.
15-Minute HIIT With Maggie Binkley. If you’re looking to get your heart-rate up, but are limited on time, this 15-minute video is for you. Maggie Binkley takes you through these short workouts each day of the week (Monday through Friday), focusing on specific areas on different days, and including a few full-body routines as well. Come Saturday, you’ll be ready to cheers to your accomplishments!
The findings indicated that exercise improves outcomes of pain, strength, ROM impairments, and function in patients with impingement syndrome. In 10 studies, investigators reported improvements in pain with supervised exercise, home exercise, exercise associated with manual therapy, and exercise after subacromial decompression. Of the 6 studies in which researchers compared pre-exercise pain with postexercise pain, 5 demonstrated that exercise produced statistically significant and clinically important reductions in pain. Two studies demonstrated improvements in pain when comparing exercise and control groups. In 1 study, investigators evaluated bracing without exercise and found no difference in pain between the brace and exercise groups. Investigators evaluated exercise combined with manual therapy in 3 studies and demonstrated improvement in pain relief in each study and improvement in strength in 1 study. In most studies, exercise also was shown to improve function. The improvement in function was statistically significant in 4 studies and clinically meaningful in 2 of these studies. In 2 studies, researchers compared supervised exercise with a home exercise program and found that function improved in both groups but was not different between groups. This finding might have resulted from a type II statistical error. In 4 studies, researchers did not find differences between acromioplasty with exercise and exercise alone for pain alone or for outcomes of pain and function.
In recent years, the simple exercise DVD has morphed into a complete “home fitness system,” offering multiple discs with up to a dozen workouts that are combined in very prescriptive ways. They come complete with diets, making them more like plans than just exercise routines. And they cost a lot more than the $10 or $12 you’d spend on a workout DVD. It has been almost a decade since P90X, the leader of the trend, came on the market. The craze shows no sign of slowing down, so we decided to find out whether four leading DVD systems were worth it.

Get your shoulders looking svelte with hand/arm raises. Riggins says here’s how to do them: Raise your hand over head; hand is at a 90-degree angle to the body as if you’re doing shoulder press with no weights. Put your hands up and raise over head; raise up to sky and bring back down. Keep repeating for 30 seconds. We know it sounds too easy, but you’ll feel it start to burn about 20 seconds in!
I did the original P90X and gained a lot of upper body strength. The one issue with the original P90X is that, after weeks and weeks of doing the videos, you start to realize how much Tony talks and how much time you're wasting -- standing there with your weights -- waiting for him to start the exercise. What I love about the + videos is that he cuts most of that out. It's straight to the exercise and he barrels through. It's a little disorienting in the beginning, as you don't know how to do the exercises at first, but it's so nice knowing that I can be finished with the workout in 30 minutes, instead of 60 for most of the regular P90X DVDS.

It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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