“I always tell people that you want to learn why you’re doing something—knowing a bunch of moves doesn’t matter as much when don’t you know how to implement them,” explains Cori Lefkowith, Orange County-based personal trainer and founder of Redefining Strength. So even if you’ve got planks and push-ups down, understanding what’s really going on while you’re training can help you reach your goals faster. We’ve decoded 25 common fitness terms for you so that you can work out with confidence and get the most out of your fitness routine.
If the phrase "3 to 4 reps at 10/5 cadence" is meaningless to you, this book may be also. If the phrase is familiar to you, you probably will already know most of what is written here. It is only to those for whom the phrase is both meaningful and interesting and to those who, in addition, are tolerant of an awkward writing style, that I would recommend the book. Even then, you might enjoy Ellington Darden more.
YouTube [Internet]. Huntly Film Archives. German fitness. (1930's). 2014 Oct 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://youtu.be/KjObalYKTHE.  The fatal blow to traditional Physical Culture in gymnasium clubs occurred at the turn of the 20th century when the new bodybuilding exercise force emerged and dramatically superseded the entire gymnasium floor space.12 Beckwith KA. Building Strength. Alan Calvert, the Milo bar-bell company, and the modernization of American weight training; PhD thesis. Austin: The University of Texas; 2006. [Google Scholar] This forced both traditional Physical Culture systems to require new professional establishments. Competitive athletes and gymnasts started training under ‘The International Gymnastics Federation’ (established in 1881)13 International Gymnastic Federation (FIG) [Internet]. History of gymnastics. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fig-gymnastics.com/site/about/federation/history. [Google Scholar] and within the ‘International Olympic Committee’ (established in 1894).14 The Olympic Museum [Internet]. The modern Olympic games. 2014 Dec 16 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.olympic.org/Assets/TOM_2013/Visit/Schools/TOM_teaching_list/ENG_The_Modern_Olympic.pdf. [Google Scholar] Concurrently, mind–body enthusiasts migrated to new independent schools, in which pioneers could express their opinions freely and gain popular following. Between 1890 and 1925, at least six new MMB schools emerged, sharing a similar exercise philosophy and practicing similar exercises. These methods, which are the focus of this paper, were led by six charismatic pioneers: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris.
Samples were collected in prefrozen 4.5 ml K3 EDTA vacutainer tubes (Becton Dickinson Vacutainer System Europe, Plymouth, UK) and immediately centrifuged at 3000 rpm (Minifuge 2, Heraeus, Germany) for 10 min, and plasma was frozen at −20°C until further analysis. Samples were assayed via RIA for cortisol (DiaSorin, Stillwater, Minnesota, USA), ACTH (Nichols Institute Diagnostics, San Juan Capistrano, California, USA), PRL (Roche Diagnostics, Mannheim, Germany) and GH (Pharmacia & Upjohn Diagnostics, Uppsala, Sweden).
4) The schedule of workouts, while ideal for those in good shape, is a bit too aggressive for most. Your muscles NEED rest (and proper nutrition) to recover and become stronger. The calendar given provides only 1 day per week to rest. You may find you need more, especially early on while you are using and building new muscles. Modifiy and listen to your body accordingly.
Notice in the workouts below that your first set calls for eight reps, your second set 10 reps and your third set 12. This is referred to in bodybuilding circles as a “reverse pyramid” (a standard pyramid goes from higher to lower reps), where you decrease the weight each set to complete the higher rep count. For example, if on your first set of lat pulldowns you used 140 pounds for eight reps, try using 120 or 130 pounds on set two and 100–120 pounds on set three.
The Alfredson protocol should be continued for 12 weeks to see optimal results.  During that time, you may wish to consult with a physical therapist who can offer advice on when to return to normal activities, such as running.  Your physical therapist can prescribe balance exercises with a BAPS board and plyometric exercises to ensure that you will be able to run and jump without suffering a re-injury to your Achilles' tendon.
It takes the gastrointestinal tract about 3 to 4 hours to completely digest a full meal. Note too that the digestion phase varies between what you are eating -- for example if you ate a banana, you can exercise after 30 minutes or 1 hour after eating it but if you ate a steak, it would take you about 3 hours before it would be good to begin exercise. That said, most people find that eating trail mix mid-hike doesn't prevent them from continuing to walk, as human beings were built to eat and move.
Ready to begin rehabbing your core before you’re cleared to exercise? We can help with this too! Have a talk with your care provider and we’ll take care of the rest. During this early rehabilitation stage, we keep it simple, helping you integrate our techniques into your new life, progressing you when you and your body are ready for the next steps. The way we connect to our body in the first several weeks postpartum can really set the stage for the months ahead.
My Free Yoga is pretty much exactly as it sounds -- it offers free yoga classes for you to enjoy! It is a little different than other yoga options on this list in that it is really a hub for yoga instructors to post their free yoga class videos. The video library is huge and you can search for classes that focus on your specific problem areas. For example, there is a category for those suffering from hip issues and another for those experiencing back pain.

Before beginning any workout program, it’s always a good idea to consult your physician. Individuals with pre-existing injuries or medical conditions or those who don’t have an accurate knowledge of their current physical fitness level should always begin cautiously. It’s also extremely important to perform all workouts, no matter what fitness method you’re doing, under the supervision of a certified instructor. Their guidance and knowledge of proper form and technique will help you to achieve maximum results while avoiding injuries. They can also help you to safely modify workout activities to match your current fitness levels and goals. Whether you attend classes in a studio or at home through DVDs or streamed videos, the presence of a trained instructor is imperative.
Altogether, our findings showed that older adults engage in a variety of exercise types, especially when instructed to perform HIIT, suggesting that future exercise interventions might profit of giving older adults the choice of different exercise types instead of offering only one. Our findings also suggest that interventions to promote exercise in older adults should focus on both indoor and outdoor environments. The popularity of exercising outdoors in both colder and warmer months highlight the importance of facilitating outdoors areas such as hiking trails. Furthermore, our findings show that sex differences in exercise patterns exist and need to be taken into consideration when designing exercise programs targeting older men and women. Given the increasing number of older adults [1] and the health benefits associated with exercise [32], information on how to get older adults to exercise and maintain their exercise behavior is important. The results of the present study can help clinicians and researchers to develop exercise programs targeting older adult’s interests and in that way improve long-term participation.
Flexibility exercise, or stretching, is a vital component of any exercise regimen. The primary purpose of flexibility training is to increase your range of motion, especially when it comes to muscles and joints. Although flexibility exercise will not improve your endurance or strength as cardio or anaerobic exercise would, flexibility training helps your body maintain its natural alignment. By doing so, flexibility exercise makes your body significantly less prone to injury during cardio or anaerobic exercise. Additionally, practicing flexibility training will increase your freedom of movement in a way that makes everyday activities easier. Tasks such as reaching up for an object on a shelf, getting up from a chair, or even sitting in confined spaces for long periods of time will greatly benefit from flexibility training.

I'm a professional weight loss coach and was chosen as "Canada's Top Fitness Professional." Each of my workouts found at makeyourbodywork.com will challenge your entire body and will include elements of cardio, strength, and core conditioning. The uniqueness of these workouts are the "difficulty levels" that provide up to four distinct options for every single move. This makes each workout very accessible for newbies, yet challenging for super-fit users.


Circuit training is a fun way to focus on strength and aerobic exercise and is great especially if you love some variety and a faster pace of working out. It’s worth noting that circuit training doesn’t offer the same level of conditioning as strength and aerobic exercise does on their own. Specifically, if your fitness goal is to be strong, circuit training is not the best way to reach that goal. You can do circuit training in groups or classes as well as alone. This article offers an easy way of creating your own circuit routines.
Exercise was defined as planned, structured activities, for instance going for walks, skiing, swimming and doing sports, but also as unplanned activities that the participants experienced as exercise. The participants were asked to fill in exercise logs immediately after each exercise session they performed throughout the year and send them to the research center either in prepaid envelopes monthly, or to use internet-based forms following each exercise session [21]. Exercise frequency was calculated as the mean number of sessions reported per week during the year. To assess intensity of exercise the participants reported their subjective RPE on a Borg scale ranging from 6 to 20 [20]. The participants were asked to report the mean intensity level during the exercise session. Ratings from 6 to 10 were classified as low intensity, 11 to 14 as moderate intensity, and 15 to 20 as high intensity. Duration of exercise was measured with a 4-point scale: less than 15 min, 15–29 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h. Less than 15 min and 15–29 min was combined due to a low response rate on these response options (1.1 and 8.7% of the total number of exercise sessions, respectively).
The relation between the increase in oxygen uptake (VO2) and increase in work rate (WR) between unloaded pedaling and maximal work during incremental cycle ergometer exercise was studied in normal men, men with uncomplicated systemic hypertension and ambulatory men with various cardiovascular diseases. The postulation was that impaired peripheral oxygen delivery would reduce the ratio of the ... [Show full abstract]Read more
The second aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Firstly, the absence of isometric KF MVC torque decrease confirms that our exercise only solicits the knee extensors and does not involve the knee flexors. Secondly, EMG RMS measured during KE MVCs shortly after exhaustion and during the recovery period was not altered by high intensity OLDE, confirming the results of a previous study [8]. Therefore, as a decrease in knee extensors force production capacity can be observed without concomitant changes in EMG signal, our data combined with the data of a previous study [8] suggest that EMG signal cannot be used to investigate dynamic exercise-induced muscle fatigue. The lack of changes in EMG signal is likely to be caused by a potentiation of the maximal evoked muscular wave (M-wave) induced by high intensity OLDE [8]. Finally, according to our hypothesis, isokinetic KE MVC torque quickly recovered and plateaued after exhaustion (within ~ 30 s at 60 and 100 deg/s, and within ~ 50 s at 140 deg/s). This quick recovery in torque production capacity is likely to be associated with recovery in both central and peripheral fatigue. This assumption is supported by one previous study in our laboratory demonstrating that not only peripheral and central fatigue, but also cortical and spinal excitability recovered shortly after exhaustion [8]. Froyd et al. [32] also demonstrated a significant recovery in skeletal muscle function within 1–2 minutes after completion of a one-leg isokinetic time trial performed at high intensity. Taking all together, these results demonstrate that to fully appreciate the extent of neuromuscular alterations induced by high intensity dynamic exercise, assessment of muscle fatigue must be performed within 30 s of cessation of the exercise.
C. Philip Gabel is the founder and principal physiotherapist at Coolum Physiotherapy, Queensland Australia. His research interests are rehabilitation and exercise, slacklining, laser therapy, and outcome measures. His publications are Cross-cultural adaptation, reliability, and validity of the Spanish version of the lower limb functional index. Health and Quality of Life Outcomes, 2014; Analysis of arm elevation muscle activity through different movement planes and speeds during in-water and dry-land exercise. Journal of Shoulder Elbow Surgery 2014.
Trainer Natalie Uhling is all about the tried and true burpee for full body conditioning in 30 seconds—though she recommends three sets of 30-second burpees with a 15-second break between sets. For “quality” burpees, she says to do the following: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and a slight bend in your knees; make sure that you are not pushing through the toes of your feet but you are starting centered. As you jump, remember to land softly because you want to protect your joints. When you make your way down to the plank position, make sure your core is protected, that means keep your hips square and your butt out of the sky.
Many exercise interventions have been conducted under controlled laboratory conditions [9], but we do not know how older adults prefer to exercise when they are not under controlled settings and are free to choose type, location and social setting (e.g. alone vs. together with others) of exercise. Furthermore, it has been shown that high-intensity interval training (HIIT) can induce superior changes in health-related markers compared to continuous moderate-intensity training (MCT) [10–13], also in older adults [14, 15]. The scientific interest in HIIT has greatly increased during recent years [9], but larger and longer studies under free-living conditions are needed to investigate whether HIIT is feasible as a public health strategy among older adults [9, 16]. Therefore, detailed information about older adults exercise patterns with MCT versus HIIT outside laboratory conditions is of particular interest.
This exercise is similar in movement to the back squat; however, the bar sits in the front rack position across the collarbones and shoulders of the athlete. HOW TO DO IT: As you drive back up, it is imperative that you raise your elbows to the sky to keep the bar in the correct position. The core should be tight to prevent the back from rounding. If you have mobility issues in the front rack position, you can cross your forearms in front of your body, parallel to the ground. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves and core.

Drop Sets. Drop sets can be performed with any exercise that involves moving weight around, like squats or the bench press. You have performed ten bench presses and couldn't possibly do eleven. Re-rack the weight and have a partner take off ten pounds or so, then perform as many reps as possible at that new weight. It's even easier to use dumbbells and simply move to smaller and smaller bells, set to set. Three total drop sets is the norm, do this to infinity and beyond and you may be way too sore the next day.
After options vest, you may purchase the company stock at the option price any time before the options expire. But exercises, as well as sales, may be prohibited during any "blackout" periods, or allowed only during window periods. Company policies must be carefully followed, as well as federal and state securities laws. Optionholders are responsible for keeping up with current insider trading regulations.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
In healthy adults, aerobic exercise has been shown to induce transient effects on cognition after a single exercise session and persistent effects on cognition following regular exercise over the course of several months.[33][42][45] People who regularly perform aerobic exercise (e.g., running, jogging, brisk walking, swimming, and cycling) have greater scores on neuropsychological function and performance tests that measure certain cognitive functions, such as attentional control, inhibitory control, cognitive flexibility, working memory updating and capacity, declarative memory, spatial memory, and information processing speed.[33][37][39][41][42][45] The transient effects of exercise on cognition include improvements in most executive functions (e.g., attention, working memory, cognitive flexibility, inhibitory control, problem solving, and decision making) and information processing speed for a period of up to 2 hours after exercising.[45]
Aerobic exercise, which speeds up your heart rate and breathing, is important for many body functions. It gives your heart and lungs a workout and increases endurance. "If you're too winded to walk up a flight of stairs, that's a good indicator that you need more aerobic exercise to help condition your heart and lungs, and get enough blood to your muscles to help them work efficiently," says Wilson.
This is an extremely high-skill movement, and is one of two Olympic Weightlifting events. HOW TO DO IT: Start with the bar on the ground with your feet hip-width apart. With your hands wide on the bar, keep a big chest as you deadlift the weight off the ground (similar to the beginning of the clean). Pull from the floor with your arms in a locked position. Then, drive your hips and pull the bar as high as possible. As you receive the bar overhead, drop down as quickly as possible and lock your arms into place in a squat position with the bar overhead. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, traps, core, shoulders and back.
^ Jump up to: a b c Cox EP, O'Dwyer N, Cook R, Vetter M, Cheng HL, Rooney K, O'Connor H (August 2016). "Relationship between physical activity and cognitive function in apparently healthy young to middle-aged adults: A systematic review". J. Sci. Med. Sport. 19 (8): 616–628. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2015.09.003. PMID 26552574. A range of validated platforms assessed CF across three domains: executive function (12 studies), memory (four studies) and processing speed (seven studies). ... In studies of executive function, five found a significant ES in favour of higher PA, ranging from small to large. Although three of four studies in the memory domain reported a significant benefit of higher PA, there was only one significant ES, which favoured low PA. Only one study examining processing speed had a significant ES, favouring higher PA.
One of the foundational moves of any strength program is the back squat. The back squat is performed with a barbell across the trapezius muscles, feet a little wider than shoulder-width apart, and feet slightly turned out. HOW TO DO IT: Take a big breath to brace the core, then send your buttocks back while keeping your chest big and proud. You should squat below parallel if your mobility allows. As you drive up, think of screwing your feet out and into the ground. This cue will fire the glutes so that you can get the most strength out of the movement. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves and core.
This section outlines the shared characteristics of the six aforementioned MMB pioneers. They all elaborated in length on their philosophy and exercises from a personal perspective, leading to a similar notion that the innate ability to stand and move harmoniously as a normal manner provides multiple advantages. These include physical and mental health, reduced movement-based symptoms, prevention and optimal injury and sickness recovery, enhanced physical performance, retention of the natural human form, and the ability to control the harmonious body rather than acquired movement impairments.
Static Hold. Static holds are familiar to some as a great strengthening technique used in yoga. They can be performed with bodyweight movements — get in the top of a plank or a deep squat position and hold — or they can be done by holding weights (in a slightly contracted position or with full lock out). Our tip? Time how long you can hold a plank to see improvement from week to week.
Exercise Videos and DVDs are a popular way people work out every day. There are a massive amount of exercise videos available that target all kinds of fitness goals. Trying to figure out which exercise videos are the best can be a real challenge. Our information can help. With all of the choices available is very easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated when you’re trying to figure out which videos are going to give you the results you are looking for. We’ve done a lot of research on the internet and studied professional fitness individuals and have compiled an exercise videos review that will take the guesswork out of which videos are the best and will help you narrow down the choices and decide on videos that will help you reach your goals.
Your heart rate refers to how many beats per minute (BPM) your heart is pumping, and when it comes to working out, knowing your heart rate can help determine if you’re working at the right intensity. You have your resting heart rate, which is how fast your heart is beating when you’re doing nothing (the best way to measure this is to take your pulse first thing in the morning). Generally speaking, this gets lower as you get more fit because your heart doesn’t have to work as hard to pump out blood (although if you have a naturally low resting heart rate thanks to genetics, it may not get much lower, and that’s totally fine, says Lefkowith). According to the American Heart Association, the average is 60-100 BPM. You also have your maximum heart rate, which is the hardest your heart can work efficiently.
We recently developed a high intensity one leg dynamic exercise (OLDE) protocol to measure muscle endurance and investigate the central and peripheral mechanisms of muscle fatigue. The aims of the present study were to establish the reliability of this novel protocol and describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Eight subjects performed the OLDE protocol (time to exhaustion test of the right leg at 85% of peak power output) three times over a week period. Isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction torque at 60 (MVC60), 100 (MVC100) and 140 (MVC140) deg/s was measured pre-exercise, shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s (P20) and 40 s (P40) post-exercise. Electromyographic (EMG) signal was analyzed via the root mean square (RMS) for all three superficial knee extensors. Mean time to exhaustion was 5.96 ± 1.40 min, coefficient of variation was 8.42 ± 6.24%, typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and intraclass correlation was 0.795. MVC torque decreased shortly after exhaustion for all angular velocities (all P < 0.001). MVC60 and MVC100 recovered between P20 (P < 0.05) and exhaustion and then plateaued. MVC140 recovered only at P40 (P < 0.05). High intensity OLDE did not alter maximal EMG RMS of the three superficial knee extensors during MVC. The results of this study demonstrate that this novel high intensity OLDE protocol could be reliably used to measure muscle endurance, and that muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE should be examined within ~ 30 s following exhaustion.
The VE group consisted of 8 women and 12 men (age 69.6 ± 3.9 years; weight 70.7 ± 12.1 kg; height 161.3 ± 6.9 cm). The control group consisted of 6 women and 14 men (age 71.2 ± 3.7 years; weight 76.1 ± 12.3 kg; height 167.5 ± 9.8 cm). Only 20 subjects of the VE group and 8 of the control group correctly completed the trials (see Figure 1 and Limitation of the Study paragraph). Adherence to protocol of the VE group was checked daily by our motor scientist by means of a daily record where he noted the week and participation number, the mean HR of the sessions, the type of exercises, and the number of repetitions per set carried out. During the training period, no adverse events such as dizziness, musculoskeletal pain, or cardiovascular issues were recorded. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in strength, flexibility, balance, and agility tested by SFT. T0-T1 differences are shown in Figures ​Figures22 and ​and3.3. Namely, 5 tests out of 6 showed significant improvement: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4; T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6; T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7; T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm; T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm; T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Conversely, the 8-foot up and go test (T0 6.5 ± 7.6 sec; T1 4.5 ± 0.6 sec, p > 0.05) showed no significant statistical difference due to a high SD in T0 assessment.
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