Jump up ^ Zhou Y, Zhao M, Zhou C, Li R (July 2015). "Sex differences in drug addiction and response to exercise intervention: From human to animal studies". Front. Neuroendocrinol. 40: 24–41. doi:10.1016/j.yfrne.2015.07.001. PMC 4712120. PMID 26182835. Collectively, these findings demonstrate that exercise may serve as a substitute or competition for drug abuse by changing ΔFosB or cFos immunoreactivity in the reward system to protect against later or previous drug use. ... As briefly reviewed above, a large number of human and rodent studies clearly show that there are sex differences in drug addiction and exercise. The sex differences are also found in the effectiveness of exercise on drug addiction prevention and treatment, as well as underlying neurobiological mechanisms. The postulate that exercise serves as an ideal intervention for drug addiction has been widely recognized and used in human and animal rehabilitation. ... In particular, more studies on the neurobiological mechanism of exercise and its roles in preventing and treating drug addiction are needed.
Too much exercise can be harmful. Without proper rest, the chance of stroke or other circulation problems increases,[80] and muscle tissue may develop slowly. Extremely intense, long-term cardiovascular exercise, as can be seen in athletes who train for multiple marathons, has been associated with scarring of the heart and heart rhythm abnormalities.[81][82][83] Specifically, high cardiac output has been shown to cause enlargement of the left and right ventricle volumes, increased ventricle wall thickness, and greater cardiac mass. These changes further result in myocardial cell damage in the lining of the heart, leading to scar tissue and thickened walls. During these processes, the protein troponin increases in the bloodstream, indicating cardiac muscle cell death and increased stress on the heart itself.[84]

Most people instinctively move weights very quickly - they jerk upwards, lower the weight without much control, and tense up and use momentum to "bounce" the weight at both ends of the repetition. The instinct serves a purpose - the speed and bounce at the ends do allow heavier weight to be moved. In competitive weightlifting both explosive speed and momentum are essential.
* Respect the body's design when exercising. We are capable of doing many things the body was not designed to do. And this is also true when it comes to physical activity. We're designed to walk, climb, and sprint. We walked a lot back in the good old days when we foraged in paradise, we climbed to get the sweetest fruit, and we occasionally sprinted to escape danger. Take a cue from little kids: they love to climb, when they run they sprint (try to get them to do distance running), and they can walk just fine. When we do the activities we're designed to do, that's when we'll be in great shape... we won't be under-active, and we won't be over-active, and both are bad for the body, for different sets of reasons.

Strength, weight, or resistance training. This type of exercise is aimed at improving the strength and function of muscles. Specific exercises are done to strengthen each muscle group. Weight lifting and exercising with stretchy resistance bands are examples of resistance training activities, as are exercises like pushups in which you work against the weight of your own body.
Although there is evidence of Pilates teaching standing exercises at Jacob’s Pillow,48 YouTube [Internet]. Difusión de Pilates. Joseph Pilates holistic video (1932). 2014 Dec 14 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BynuIO3smSI. [Google Scholar] he excluded standing exercises from his 34 exercise Contrology home routine, in contrast to the documented repertoires of Checkley,9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Müller,15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Randell,25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] Vaughan,47 Youtube [Internet]. Vaughan, K. Childbirth as an athletic feat (1939). 2009 Feb 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9wRBWDxReY. [Google Scholar] and Morris33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] that were dominated by standing exercises. He explained: ‘Note that all the exercises are performed while you are in a sitting or reclining position. This is done to relieve your heart from undue strain as well as to take advantage of the more normal (original) visceral organs.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar]
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
Besides toning the muscles, Pilates is known for boosting endurance. A wall and small hand-weights are the only necessities for this highly effective exercise. Stand with your back against the wall and feet hip-width apart. Walk the feet out a little, bend the knees, and slide down as if sitting in a chair. Progress in intensity each day until you can get your upper legs parallel to the floor. Raise the arms to shoulder height and hold for 30 seconds. Do two reps.
We've said it before, but HIIT really does the job when you want to trim ab fat: A study published in the Journal of Sports Medicine and Physical Fitness found that people who did two HIIT and two strength sessions a week lost more visceral fat (11 percent of the dangerous kind around your organs)—about an extra inch from their waist—than those who ran twice and did two strength sessions. Plus, many of those speedy intervals, such as sprints, are total-body moves that engage your abs big time. Do speed bursts on a cardio machine or try three-minute boxing rounds (another transverse tightener) with a minute of active recovery in between. This unique HIIT workout incorporates some boxing moves and some weight training for double the benefits. (Don't get along with HIIT training? Studies show adding music will make it more enjoyable.)

No matter where you are, you have time for 30 seconds of what Haley calls “Anywhere Push-Ups.” “This will target chest and triceps. Find a hard surface like kitchen counter or office desk. With both hands on the surface, walk away so that you’re in an elevated push-up position—the further you walk the more challenging the exercise,” she says. “Lower your body down so elbows and shoulders are at a 90-degree angle, push back up and repeat for ten reps.”
Pharmacologic beta-adrenergic blockade reduces maximal heart rate (HR) during exercise but variable results have been reported for minute ventilation (VE), CO2 output (VCO2), and O2 uptake (VO2). A total group of 19 subjects with mild asthma was studied. We studied 16 subjects from the group who received placebo or pindolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, during 1-min incremental exercise on a ... [Show full abstract]Read more
(3) Recovery Phase (<60% HRR). Postural control and spine mobility exercises in a quadrupedal position with the platform support, exercises of static balance over either 4 or 2 supports, eyes either open or closed, and with core muscle activation. The latter phase also included various poststretch exercises to restore the preexercise muscle length.
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