Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
Bottom line. Strength training with heavy weights is a better way to target your glutes, but that’s not something most people will do. The program includes low- and high-impact routines, so you don’t need to be extremely fit to start. If you don’t mind doing lots of squats and lunges and you like the idea of dancing your way to fitness, this may be good for you. The Brazil Butt Lift eating plan includes basic recipes with easy variations.
You may commit to crunches and planks, Pilates and yoga, all in an effort to target your abs, which they do, but don't stop there. Broaden your "rep"ertoire to include some of these other types of moves and methods (some of which you can do at your desk), and suddenly your core is being challenged with every motion—even though your mind is never on your middle. (Just don't forget abs are made in the kitchen too. Steer clear of these foods to prevent bloating.)
Use our illustrated exercise guide to discover new exercises to try in your workouts, learn which muscle groups different exercises target and how to perform them correctly. The clear images show correct form and the written instructions will guide you through the exercise movement. Want to build your own workouts with these exercises? You can do exactly that and much more with a Fit account. Check it out and start your free trial today!
Now that the holidays are creeping around the corner, you may have to break up with your regularly scheduled sweat sessions, at least temporarily. And though the most wonderful time of the year may interfere with your fave spin class or butt-kicking bootcamp routine, it’s completely possible to stay fit—all you need is an Internet connection and a little living room space. (OK, and maybe a few props here and there.) And it’s all thanks to these seriously excellent, totally free workout videos. We’ve rounded up the best YouTube workouts—we’re talking everything from traditional aerobics to ballet to high-intensity interval training routines—so you can keep your physique in tip-top shape this season and beyond.
6.  If an exercise can be done for more than 90 seconds, increase the resistance so that momentary muscular failure occurs within 45 - 90 seconds (this is considered "high-intensity" exercise). If you can do sit-ups for ten minutes, the intensity is insufficient to cross that threshold mentioned above, and you're just wasting valuable physiological resources. If you can't do even one rep, reduce the resistance (i.e. if doing a push-up, change from being on your toes to on your knees, or start from the top and slowly lower yourself; if using a machine, choose a lower setting; if using free-weights, pick a lower weight; if doing a chin-up, use a chair to boost yourself up to the top, then take your feet off the chair and slowly lower yourself).

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.

×