One way repeated ANOVA was used to compare pre-exercise neuromuscular parameters between sessions (S1, S2 and S3). As no pre-exercise (pre) neuromuscular parameters differed between sessions (except EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s), all pre-exercise parameters (except EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s) were averaged. Neuromuscular parameters were then analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA (time: pre, exhaustion, P20 and P40). Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (pre vs exhaustion, exhaustion vs P20, P20 vs P40) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction. Cohen’s effect size f(V) was also calculated.

Figure 7 Saw. Randell, reproduced with kind permission of Wellcome Library26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar] and Morris, reproduced with kind permission of Elsevier.33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar]
Altogether, our findings showed that older adults engage in a variety of exercise types, especially when instructed to perform HIIT, suggesting that future exercise interventions might profit of giving older adults the choice of different exercise types instead of offering only one. Our findings also suggest that interventions to promote exercise in older adults should focus on both indoor and outdoor environments. The popularity of exercising outdoors in both colder and warmer months highlight the importance of facilitating outdoors areas such as hiking trails. Furthermore, our findings show that sex differences in exercise patterns exist and need to be taken into consideration when designing exercise programs targeting older men and women. Given the increasing number of older adults [1] and the health benefits associated with exercise [32], information on how to get older adults to exercise and maintain their exercise behavior is important. The results of the present study can help clinicians and researchers to develop exercise programs targeting older adult’s interests and in that way improve long-term participation.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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