EMG of the Vastus Lateralis (VL), Rectus Femoris (RF), Vastus Medialis (VM) and Biceps Femoris was recorded with pairs of silver chloride circular (recording diameter of 10 mm) surface electrodes (Swaromed, Nessler Medizintechnik, ref 1066, Innsbruck, Austria) with an interelectrode (center-to-center) distance of 20 mm. Recording sites (belly of each muscle, as distal as possible from the hips when the subject was asked to contract his quadriceps at a knee angle of 10 deg) were then carefully adjusted at the beginning of each testing session (electrode placement was drawn on the skin with permanent marker to ensure reproducibility of the recording site). Low resistance between the two electrodes (< 5 kΩ) was obtained by shaving the skin, and dirt was removed from the skin using alcohol swabs. The reference electrode was attached to the patella of the right knee. Myoelectrical signals were amplified with a bandwidth frequency ranging from 10 Hz to 500 Hz (gain: VL = 500; RF and VM = 1000), digitized on-line at a sampling frequency of 2 kHz using a computer, and stored for analysis with commercially available software (Acqknowledge 4.2 for MP Systems, Biopac Systems Inc., Goleta, USA). Due to the pressure of the thigh on the dynamometer chair, the Biceps Femoris EMG signal quality was impaired (e.g. numerous artefacts, problems with electrodes) and therefore not analyzed.
Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow technical manual represents the first major advancement in exercise science since Arthur Jones' Nautilus Bulletins were published back in the early 1970's. Unlike most of the books that have been written on the subject over the past few decades, which are based on assumption and faulty reasoning, Mr. Hutchin's SuperSlow manual presents an exercise protocol based on solid reasoning, and principles logically derived from the classical sciences of biology and mechanical physics, and for the first time provides a proper definition of the word: exercise. I very strongly recommend this book to everyone with an interest in exercise, especially physicians, therapists and exercise instructors, who are looking for a safer, a more time-efficient, and a more productive method of exercise for themselves, their patients or clients. SuperSlow is not just better than other exercise protocols, it is so far superior to every other activity ever devised for the purpose of physical conditioning that no meaningful comparison is even possible. This is the future of exercise.
I believe we are coming around to the conclusion that what was recommended for years by the medical community (30 minutes of "aerobic exercise" 3-5 times a week, getting the heart rate up to 80% max. for age, etc.) has been inadequate, and of too low an intensity level. When an activity is of sufficient intensity, and not of a certain duration or repeated a certain number of times, the body will initiate a total-body response (metabolic, HDL, glucose tolerance, blood pressure, bone mineral density, immune competency, etc.) It appears that if this level of intensity is never reached, regardless of the amount of time spent or the frequency it is repeated, the beneficial response by the body never occurs, or is at least blunted.
This is also the point at which exercise becomes more critical. Bone and muscle mass peak at the end of your 20s. Unchecked, sarcopenia, or muscle loss, can claim up to 50 percent of an inactive adult’s muscle tissue by the time he or she reaches 70, according to a 2014 Johns Hopkins University study. Your VO2 max — a measure of how much oxygen your body can process — declines similarly, dropping about 10 percent per decade after around age 30 in healthy sedentary adults of both sexes.
(3) Recovery Phase (<60% HRR). Postural control and spine mobility exercises in a quadrupedal position with the platform support, exercises of static balance over either 4 or 2 supports, eyes either open or closed, and with core muscle activation. The latter phase also included various poststretch exercises to restore the preexercise muscle length.
Major variants: reverse ~ (curling the pelvis towards the shoulders), twisting ~ or side ~ (lifting one shoulder at a time; emphasis is on the obliques), cable ~ (pulling down on a cable machine while kneeling), sit-up ~ (have [chest] touch your knees), vertical crunch (propping up to dangle legs and pulling knees to the [ chest] or keeping legs straight and pulling up legs to a 90 degree position). Reverse hanging crunch (using gravity boots or slings to hang head down and pulling to a 90 or 180 degree form)
The beauty of squats is you can do them anywhere—in line at the grocery store or while brushing your teeth—so there’s never an excuse to find those extra 30 seconds. Tone It Up founders Karena Dawn and Katrina Scott say the booty shapin’, leg sculptin’ move is their go-to exercise. “Squats are great for toning your thighs and booty and you can do them without any equipment,” they explain. “Just make sure that your feet are hip-width apart and knees don’t go passed your toes throughout the move. This will help prevent injury.” Bonus: Squats are a great way to combat that desk job that’s flattening your butt. Discover 35 Tips for Every Type of Job for more advice!
These classes are rooted in military-style training, so are typically pretty tough, and they often include a combination of cardio and strength exercises. “Boot camp programs are designed to build strength and fitness through a variety of intense group intervals,” explains Denver-based personal trainer Tara Laferrara. “It often starts with running, followed by a wide variety of interval training, including bodyweight moves like push-ups and sit-ups, and various types of intense explosive exercises.”
This stands for rate of perceived exertion, and refers to intensity. It’s a point of reference that trainers often use to communicate how hard you should be working since what feels easy or challenging is different for everyone. On the RPE scale a 1 pretty much means zero effort while a 10 means you’re working harder than you thought you possibly could.
At the end of each pregnancy journey, you’re greeted by the mother of all marathons and we want to help you prepare for your birth experience in the best possible ways. Our Bloom classes as well as our 1:1 foundational crash courses were designed with empowerment in mind. We can’t promise you’ll find gentle workouts behind our studio door [you’ve got a marathon to train for] but we can promise that each workout will give you the safest, most effective, mind + body focused workout you’ll find in the prenatal world. Our workouts will make you sweat, challenging you both mentally and physically, while we integrate our signature techniques seamlessly into each exercise you move through. Think of it as childbirth education meets a safe sweat session gifting you tools to be used time and time again.
Sample characteristics are presented as mean ± standard deviation for continuous variables and proportions for categorical variables. Pearson Chi-square test and independent samples t-test were used to assess potential sex differences. For BMI and weight, a non-parametric test (Mann-Whitney U) was conducted due to the lack of normal distribution. Data from the exercise logs are presented as proportions of the total number of exercise logs. Pearson Chi-square tests were run to assess the associations between frequency, intensity, type, location and social setting of exercise with sex and training group. The results were considered statistically significant if the p-value was less than 0.05. All statistical analyses were performed with SPSS 22 (Statistical Package for Social Science, Chicago, IL, USA).
In Week 1 you’ll perform three sets of every exercise per workout, which over the course of the week adds up to nine sets total for each bodypart, a good starting volume for your purposes. With the exception of crunches for abs, you’ll do 8–12 reps per set. This rep scheme is widely considered ideal for achieving gains in muscle size (the scientific term is hypertrophy) and is commonly employed by amateur and pro bodybuilders alike.
I found pound at Crunch Fitness when I lived in LA. You had to sign up for the class ahead of time and they would run out of sticks because the classes were so packed (so I ended up buying my own to bring). The live classes were much more fun than the videos, I think because of the music. At the gym, the instructors would play fun current or popular hit songs really loud. In the videos, it’s more focused on instruction than the music, even though they have options for music only –see below.
Stephanie Mansour, weight loss and lifestyle coach for women, has a great way to get your triceps toned while you’re watching TV. Just do 30 tricep dips on your couch. Here’s how: “Hands on edge of couch, fingers facing you. Bend your knees at 90-degree angle, scooting your butt up so it almost touches the couch,” she says. “Bend at the elbows, lower your body down, then press back up and straighten your arms. Repeat for 30 seconds to work on arm flab.”
It’s not an exact science, but when you hear the term plyometric, you can go ahead and think jumping and breathlessness. Examples would include squat jumps, box jumps, broad jumps, and burpees. One of the main purposes of these explosive exercises is increasing power, says Laferrera. Having more power means you can recruit muscle fiber faster and more efficiently, which pays off when you’re moving heavy objects or working on sprinting drills in the gym, adds Lefkowith. Plus, because these moves get your heart rate up, they’re big calorie-burners. Here are seven plyometric moves you can do at home.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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