Although there is research concluding the effectiveness of the Alfredson protocol, some individuals find the completion of 180 repetitions of exercise daily to be difficult to achieve.  A study in the February 2014 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy indicated that a modified version of the Alfredson protocol with a "do as much as tolerated" approach achieved similar positive results as the full 180 repetition protocol.

Aerobic exercise induces short- and long-term effects on mood and emotional states by promoting positive affect, inhibiting negative affect, and decreasing the biological response to acute psychological stress.[45] Over the short-term, aerobic exercise functions as both an antidepressant and euphoriant,[46][47][48][49] whereas consistent exercise produces general improvements in mood and self-esteem.[50][51]
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
In parallel, Prussian nationalist and exercise instructor Friedrich Ludwig Jahn (1778–1852) advocated strengthening one’s mind and body through gymnastics.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Jahn invented the standard equipment of modern gymnastics; the parallel bars, rings, balance beam, horse, and horizontal bar4 Bakewell S. Illustrations from the Wellcome Institute Library: Medical gymnastics and the Cyriax collection. Med Hist. 1997;41:487–95.10.1017/S0025727300063067[Crossref], [PubMed], [Web of Science ®] [Google Scholar] and in 1811, founded the Physical Culture Movement in Germany.8 The Historic society of Pennsylvania [Internet]. Progress turnverein. 2007 May 3 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://hsp.org/sites/default/files/legacy_files/migrated/findingaid3057progressturnverein.pdf. [Google Scholar] Ling and Jahn’s Physical Culture gained following and flourished in gymnasiums throughout Europe and later in the United States of America until the end of the 19th century. However, toward the end of the century, the original concept of harmonious interaction between the competitive and holistic exercise systems eroded and deteriorated. This was due to the late 19th century shift in the gymnasium environment toward harsh paramilitary style training.9–11 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890.

Intensity: The best exercise intensity for CFS/ME patients is low intensity and low-impact, at least in the beginning. IF post exercise malaise occurs, try not to skip workouts, just go back to a lower intensity and less duration. Please note that I do consider cleaning one of those daily activities that can be harder on the fibro body than structured exercise. Do not determine your ability to exercise on difficulty with cleaning, bending, stopping, starting, etc that is involved there.

The beneficial effect of exercise on the cardiovascular system is well documented. There is a direct correlation between physical inactivity and cardiovascular mortality, and physical inactivity is an independent risk factor for the development of coronary artery disease. Low levels of physical exercise increase the risk of cardiovascular diseases mortality.[22]
Limitation of the Study. One potential limit of the present study undoubtedly regards the limited number of subjects involved in the study and the operating loss of the control group. Unfortunately, too many participants of the latter did not satisfy the requirements during the study, thus impeding a comparative statistical approach. Further studies are therefore needed to confirm our conclusions, in particular with a larger sample and control group.

Here's a way to tone the thighs and butt without a reformer. Begin by kneeling. Lean to the left, placing your left hand on the mat under the shoulder and your right hand behind the head with the elbow pointing up. Raise your right leg until it is parallel to the floor. Holding the torso steady, kick the leg to the front and then to the back, knee straight. Do five reps on each side.

This section outlines the shared characteristics of the six aforementioned MMB pioneers. They all elaborated in length on their philosophy and exercises from a personal perspective, leading to a similar notion that the innate ability to stand and move harmoniously as a normal manner provides multiple advantages. These include physical and mental health, reduced movement-based symptoms, prevention and optimal injury and sickness recovery, enhanced physical performance, retention of the natural human form, and the ability to control the harmonious body rather than acquired movement impairments.


Making older adults exercise and keeping them in exercise programs is a major challenge. Understanding how older adults prefer to exercise may help developing tailored exercise programs and increase sustained exercise participation in ageing populations. We aimed to describe exercise patterns, including frequency, intensity, type, location and social setting of exercise, in older adults instructed to follow continuous moderate-intensity training (MCT) or high-intensity interval training (HIIT) over a one-year period.
10.  Work the whole body during one session. Exercising different muscle groups on different days is counterproductive. Your whole workout should take no longer than 45 minutes, and this includes time spent on a treadmill to move lymph fluid to prevent lactic acid pooling in muscles. (Forty-five minutes, once a week for a high level of fitness... who can't find time for that!)

13.  Stretching is useful only upon awakening from sleep... it is not necessary prior to working out. As muscles become stronger, their associated tendons and ligaments will be stretched appropriately during the actual exercise, and you will have "functional flexibility", which is all you need. Many people are over-stretching their ligaments, and this leads to joint instability, which increases the chances of injury. Unless you are engaged in martial arts, ballet, or are training for the Olympics, you do not need to consciously stretch anything prior to a workout performed as outlined here.


By the 1930s, the method was flourishing and the St Thomas faculty was reinforced with two of Randell’s distinguished physiotherapy graduates: Australian hockey star and medical student Barbara Mortimer Thomas (1910–1940), who served as main instructor,29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar] and English dancer and choreographer Margaret Morris (1891–1980), who already used remedial exercises in her dance teaching.30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar] Exercising to the beat of classical music, the dance moves and grace typical of the St Thomas Method exercises are attributed to Morris.
The deadlift is one of the foundational strength movements in any exercise program. HOW TO DO IT: The deadlift begins with the bar on the ground. You can perform this with a regular grip or an alternating grip, which means one hand facing towards your body and one hand facing away. With a proud chest and locked core, pull the bar up while keeping it as close to your body as possible. Use your hip hinge and push your knees back to keep your body over the bar. Then extend the hips and squeeze the glutes to complete the move. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, back and core.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Mura G, Moro MF, Patten SB, Carta MG (2014). "Exercise as an add-on strategy for the treatment of major depressive disorder: a systematic review". CNS Spectr. 19 (6): 496–508. doi:10.1017/S1092852913000953. PMID 24589012. Considered overall, the studies included in the present review showed a strong effectiveness of exercise combined with antidepressants. ...

2. On Super Slow, you should be using about as much resistance as you use on a traditional strength training workout. A traditional strength training set is 10 repetitions at a speed of 2 seconds up and 2 seconds down per repetition. That's 40 seconds per working set. 2-4 Super Slow repetitions, at 10 seconds up and 10 seconds down, is 40-80 seconds, or at most twice as much time. At that pace, if you could handle 100 pounds at 10 reps of 2/2 you should be able to handle 100 pounds for 3 reps of 10/10.

If you're one of those busy folks who thinks you simply don't have time to exercise, let this DVD prove you wrong. You'll get two 30-minute cardio-strength workouts: The first is a boxing workout, and the second is focused on strength training with weights. Meant to be quick, effective and empowering, these workouts will be over before you know it!

Few interventions exist whereby patients can hope to achieve improvements in both psychiatric symptoms and physical health simultaneously without significant risks of adverse effects. Physical activity offers substantial promise for improving outcomes for people living with mental illness, and the inclusion of physical activity and exercise programs within treatment facilities is warranted given the results of this review.


Alicia Marie, celebrity trainer, says you can change your core with plank twist corkscrews. “Hold in low plank position, keeping your core muscles tight and your forearms flat,” she says. “Slowly rotate your hips to one side, being sure not to drop them to the floor, then rotate your hips back to center. With your core muscles still engaged, rotate to the opposite side. Alternate back and forth slowly, completing five reps on each side for a total of four sets.”

Jump up ^ Magnoni, L. J; Crespo, D; Ibarz, A; Blasco, J; Fernández-Borràs, J; Planas, J. V (2013). "Effects of sustained swimming on the red and white muscle transcriptome of rainbow trout (Oncorhynchus mykiss) fed a carbohydrate-rich diet". Comparative Biochemistry and Physiology Part A: Molecular & Integrative Physiology. 166 (3): 510–21. doi:10.1016/j.cbpa.2013.08.005. PMID 23968867.
One of the main reasons I don't do Pilates very often is that, for me, it gets too boring after a while. Enter this DVD. Made up of five 10-minute workouts, it kept me engaged because I was able to change up the routine often, or, if I only had a few minutes available, I could still squeeze in a workout with just one of the programs. I just might be a Pilates convert after all.
Warm up. This is the act of preparing your body for the stress of exercise. The body can be warmed up with light intensity aerobic movements like walking slowly. These movements increase blood flow, which in turn heats up muscles and joints. "Think of it as a lube job for the body," Bryant explains. At the end of your warm-up, it's a good idea to do a little light stretching.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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