These leisurely pursuits have their place, but there’s no substitute for the intensity of intervals and strength training or plyometrics. “When you reduce your intensity, athletic performance declines,” he says. “Cardiovascular fitness and other physiological metrics drop off.” Bone density suffers, too — particularly in women. In short, when you stop pushing yourself, you’ll become less fit, less healthy.
Within the MMB philosophical approach, the body’s nutritional and movement systems were integral. The key to maintaining a healthy digestive system and reducing fat percentage lay in regular exercise practice and a balanced diet. Checkley ridiculed fad diets, claiming they were unnecessary and irrelevant to a long-term solution.9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Müller claimed that ‘When your digestive system has been invigorated through physical exercise you can safely eat almost every kind of food’.15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Pilates recommended ‘to eat only enough food to restore the fuel consumed by the body’.46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar]
Summary of long-term adaptations to regular aerobic and anaerobic exercise. Aerobic exercise can cause several central cardiovascular adaptations, including an increase in stroke volume (SV)[102] and maximal aerobic capacity (VO2 max),[102][103] as well as a decrease in resting heart rate (RHR).[104][105][106] Long-term adaptations to resistance training, the most common form of anaerobic exercise, include muscular hypertrophy,[107][108] an increase in the physiological cross-sectional area (PCSA) of muscle(s), and an increase in neural drive,[109][110] both of which lead to increased muscular strength.[111] Neural adaptations begin more quickly and plateau prior to the hypertrophic response.[112][113]
This is the first study that has followed older adults instructed to perform MCT or HIIT over a one-year period, collected data from each exercise session they performed and provided important knowledge about their exercise patterns. This novel information may help researchers and clinicians to develop tailored exercise programs in an ageing population.
By the 1930s, the method was flourishing and the St Thomas faculty was reinforced with two of Randell’s distinguished physiotherapy graduates: Australian hockey star and medical student Barbara Mortimer Thomas (1910–1940), who served as main instructor,29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar] and English dancer and choreographer Margaret Morris (1891–1980), who already used remedial exercises in her dance teaching.30 Margaret Morris Movement (MMM) [Internet]. Margaret Morris - Biography. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.margaretmorrismovement.com/MargaretMorris. [Google Scholar] Exercising to the beat of classical music, the dance moves and grace typical of the St Thomas Method exercises are attributed to Morris.
Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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