Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow technical manual represents the first major advancement in exercise science since Arthur Jones' Nautilus Bulletins were published back in the early 1970's. Unlike most of the books that have been written on the subject over the past few decades, which are based on assumption and faulty reasoning, Mr. Hutchin's SuperSlow manual presents an exercise protocol based on solid reasoning, and principles logically derived from the classical sciences of biology and mechanical physics, and for the first time provides a proper definition of the word: exercise. I very strongly recommend this book to everyone with an interest in exercise, especially physicians, therapists and exercise instructors, who are looking for a safer, a more time-efficient, and a more productive method of exercise for themselves, their patients or clients. SuperSlow is not just better than other exercise protocols, it is so far superior to every other activity ever devised for the purpose of physical conditioning that no meaningful comparison is even possible. This is the future of exercise.
Jump up ^ Olsen CM (December 2011). "Natural rewards, neuroplasticity, and non-drug addictions". Neuropharmacology. 61 (7): 1109–1122. doi:10.1016/j.neuropharm.2011.03.010. PMC 3139704. PMID 21459101. Similar to environmental enrichment, studies have found that exercise reduces self-administration and relapse to drugs of abuse (Cosgrove et al., 2002; Zlebnik et al., 2010). There is also some evidence that these preclinical findings translate to human populations, as exercise reduces withdrawal symptoms and relapse in abstinent smokers (Daniel et al., 2006; Prochaska et al., 2008), and one drug recovery program has seen success in participants that train for and compete in a marathon as part of the program (Butler, 2005). ... In humans, the role of dopamine signaling in incentive-sensitization processes has recently been highlighted by the observation of a dopamine dysregulation syndrome in some patients taking dopaminergic drugs. This syndrome is characterized by a medication-induced increase in (or compulsive) engagement in non-drug rewards such as gambling, shopping, or sex (Evans et al., 2006; Aiken, 2007; Lader, 2008).

14.  If you don't feel like working out, don't! Listen to your body. Just because it's your "scheduled day" doesn't mean you must work out. If your body is taking a little longer to recover than usual, so be it. It won't hurt you to lay off for an additional day or two; you will not lose anything you've gained. If your body isn't ready, it's better to skip days than to work out anyway. Every seven days is only a target (some people have found every eight or nine days reap the same benefits).
Go online for more information, recommends certified personal trainer Paula Zurowski. Web sites like collagevideo.com or Zurowski's exercisevideosreviews.com offer detailed descriptions and ratings of fitness videos. Collage even offers a one-minute clip of most videos, so you can get a feel for the level of the workout and whether you're going to like the instructor.

Thus, little is known about the effects of monitored vigorous exercise in elderly people. While significant benefits for basic motor tasks (such as balance and gait) can be achieved through different kinds of physical activity (i.e., stretching exercises, treadmill, Pilates, and strength and balance training), no conclusive relationship has been proven between its intensity and such improvements. Recently, Pau et al. [14] reported that spatiotemporal gait parameters and sit-to-stand performance significantly improve through vigorous (but not light) exercises, thus suggesting that higher levels of intensity might be more suitable in generally improving static and dynamic daily motor tasks.
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