Jump up ^ Silverman MN, Deuster PA (October 2014). "Biological mechanisms underlying the role of physical fitness in health and resilience". Interface Focus. 4 (5): 20140040. doi:10.1098/rsfs.2014.0040. PMC 4142018. PMID 25285199. Importantly, physical exercise can improve growth factor signalling directly or indirectly by reducing pro-inflammatory signalling [33]. Exercise-induced increases in brain monoamines (norepinephrine and serotonin) may also contribute to increased expression of hippocampal BDNF [194]. In addition, other growth factors—insulin-like growth factor-1 (IGF-1) and vascular endothelial growth factor—have been shown to play an important role in BDNF-induced effects on neuroplasticity [33,172,190,192], as well as exerting neuroprotective effects of their own [33,214,215], thereby contributing to the beneficial effects of exercise on brain health.
Multiple new, yet generally typical MMB methods originated after 1950, including the Feldenkrais Method;51 Reese M [Internet]. A biography of Moshe Feldenkrais. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.feldenkrais.com/moshe-feldenkrais. [Google Scholar] the modern form of Calisthenics;52 Ozer Kaya D, Duzgun I, Baltaci G, Karacan S, Colakoglu F. Effects of calisthenics and Pilates exercises on coordination and proprioception in adult women: a randomized controlled trial. J Sport Rehabil. 2012;21(3):235–43. [Google Scholar] Gyrokinesis and Gyrotonic by Horvath;53 Gyrotonic and Gyrokinesis [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.gyrotonic.com. [Google Scholar] Gaga by Naharin54 Gaga [Internet]. 2015 Aug 28 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://gagapeople.com/english/about-gaga/. [Google Scholar] and CoreAlign55 The CoreAlign [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/education/corealign/index.html. [Google Scholar] and Human Harmony by Hoffman.56 Human Harmony Training [Internet]. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.fffforlife.com/#!human-harmony-training/c66t. [Google Scholar] In recent decades, many allied health professionals and therapists have embraced the MMB concepts as an integral part of their practice and detailed in mainstream scientific literature their research findings on its effectiveness.57–59 Wells C, Kolt GS, Marshall P, Hill B, Bialocerkowski A. Effectiveness of Pilates exercise in treating people with chronic low back pain: a systematic review of systematic reviews. BMC Med Res Methodol. 2013;13:7. Available from: http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3563510/10.1186/1471-2288-13-7
Jump up ^ Blondell SJ, Hammersley-Mather R, Veerman JL (May 2014). "Does physical activity prevent cognitive decline and dementia?: A systematic review and meta-analysis of longitudinal studies". BMC Public Health. 14: 510. doi:10.1186/1471-2458-14-510. PMC 4064273. PMID 24885250. Longitudinal observational studies show an association between higher levels of physical activity and a reduced risk of cognitive decline and dementia. A case can be made for a causal interpretation. Future research should use objective measures of physical activity, adjust for the full range of confounders and have adequate follow-up length. Ideally, randomised controlled trials will be conducted. ... On the whole the results do, however, lend support to the notion of a causal relationship between physical activity, cognitive decline and dementia, according to the established criteria for causal inference.
In the present study, we measured muscle endurance by completion of time to exhaustion tests where the subject has to maintain a fix workload for as long as possible. All time to exhaustion tests lasted less than ten minutes, confirming that OLDE was performed at high intensity. The duration of the time to exhaustion tests in the present study is in accordance with previous studies using the same exercise on a different ergometer [11, 17, 18]. Relative reliability refers to the degree to which individuals maintain their position in a sample with repeated measurements [30]. The ICC value of 0.795 can be interpreted as a questionable reliability (ICC < 0.8), close to the threshold for good reliability (0.8 < ICC < 0.9) [19]. However, as no consensus really exists on threshold to interpret ICC results [31], the practical significance of its value has to be determined with caution by the readers according to their future use of the present protocol. Absolute reliability refers to the degree to which repeated measurements vary for individuals [30]. Traditionally, time to exhaustion tests are known to present a greater CV (CV > 10%) than time trials (i.e. subjects has to perform the greater amount of work possible in a fixed time/distance; CV < 5%) [20]. Interestingly, in our study the CV is below 10%, confirming the great reliability of our novel high intensity OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance, this despite the small sample size, chosen to be in accordance with previously published studies using the same protocol [8, 11, 17]. This great reliability is confirmed by the typical error of measurement value of 0.30 min, corresponding to 5% of the averaged performance value. Finally, as the typical error of measurement value was slightly above the smallest worthwhile change calculated (0.28 min), it is unlikely that our novel high intensity OLDE protocol can be used to detect small differences in performance.
The hypothalamus is under the control of several “higher” brain centres and several neurotransmitters 13 known to play a major role in various neuroendocrine and behavioural functions, for example, activation of the HPA axis, feeding and locomotion.14 Therefore, the typical HPA axisrelated hormones cortisol, adrenocorticotrophic hormone (ACTH), prolactin (PRL) and human growth hormone (GH) were targeted in the present study.
Jump up ^ Gomez-Pinilla F, Hillman C (January 2013). "The influence of exercise on cognitive abilities". Compr. Physiol. 3 (1): 403–428. doi:10.1002/cphy.c110063. ISBN 9780470650714. PMC 3951958. PMID 23720292. Abundant research in the last decade has shown that exercise is one of the strongest promoters of neurogenesis in the brain of adult rodents (97, 102) and humans (1,61), and this has introduced the possibility that proliferating neurons could contribute to the cognitive enhancement observed with exercise. In addition to BDNF, the actions of IGF-1 and vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) (54) are considered essential for the angiogenic and neurogenic effects of exercise in the brain. Although the action of exercise on brain angiogenesis has been known for many years (10), it is not until recently that neurovascular adaptations in the hippocampus have been associated with cognitive function (29). Exercise enhances the proliferation of brain endothelial cells throughout the brain (113), hippocampal IGF gene expression (47), and serum levels of both IGF (178) and VEGF (63). IGF-1 and VEGF, apparently produced in the periphery, support exercise induced neurogenesis and angiogenesis, as corroborated by blocking the effects of exercise using antibodies against IGF-1 (47) or VEGF (63).
There are two other studies that have measured prolactin in relation to overtraining. Lehmann et al23 showed that an increase in training volume, rather than intensity, led to more symptoms associated with overtraining. They also observed a close-to-significant exercise-induced decrease in plasma prolactin in the increased intensity group but no change because of increased volume. Budgett et al24 observed a more marked plasma prolactin response to a neuroendocrine challenge in athletes with unexplained underperformance syndrome. They also observed a higher resting plasma prolactin in unexplained underperformance syndrome athletes than healthy controls. These authors also state that prolactin could prove useful in monitoring the individual response to training and recovery.
One remedy for the exercise doldrums is to keep exploring new types of movement, even if you’re already committed to a particular form of exercise. Novel activities — dance, martial arts, outdoor exercise — can work wonders for your brain, your mood, and your fascia. Massage, Rolfing, Feldenkrais, foam rolling, and other bodywork modalities can keep these tissues supple, too, so you can continue to move well, and without pain, for decades to come.
Pilates uses your body weight for resistance and focuses on working both small and large groups of muscles. Over time, core strength, flexibility and muscle tone will begin to increase. Maximum results are achieved by working out at least 3 days a week. Pilates is not an aerobic exercise method, so it’s best to combine it with a few days of cardiovascular exercise. Although the movements are small and slow, Pilates provides an intense full-body workout.
If sit-ups give you a sore neck, try this alternative. Lie flat with the end of a resistance band or towel tucked under the center of your back. Bend your knees and grab the other end of the band above your head. Inhale and use your ab muscles to slowly peel your body up, letting your head rest against the band. Exhale and return to the starting position. Do five reps, making sure your abs do all the work.
Aerobic exercise also helps relax blood vessel walls, lower blood pressure, burn body fat, lower blood sugar levels, reduce inflammation, boost mood, and raise "good" HDL cholesterol. Combined with weight loss, it can lower "bad" LDL cholesterol levels, too. Over the long term, aerobic exercise reduces your risk of heart disease, stroke, type 2 diabetes, breast and colon cancer, depression, and falls.
Exercise and physical activity fall into four basic categories—endurance, strength, balance, and flexibility. Most people tend to focus on one activity or type of exercise and think they’re doing enough. Each type is different, though. Doing them all will give you more benefits. Mixing it up also helps to reduce boredom and cut your risk of injury.
Raphael AJ. Natural childbirth in twentieth century England; PhD thesis. London: Queen Mary University of London; 2010.  To create the method, Randell, (whose brother Francis William Randell and wife Jessie experienced two failed births in 1907 and 1913)24 Wildings & Thurleys, Cantophers & McConnells [Internet]. Hatches, matches and dispatches only. 2008 Nov 11 [cited 2015 Sep 23]. Available from: http://website.lineone.net/~hstjw/p32.htm#i549. [Google Scholar] was inspired by Ling’s philosophy and exercises of preventative medicine.22 Polden M, Mantle J. Physiotherapy in obstetrics and gynaecology. 2nd ed. Oxford: Butterworth Heinemann; 2004. [Google Scholar] Her repertoire included full-body movement exercises in the lying, sitting, and standing positions.25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] The objectives of the pre-natal exercises were ‘to improve the physical and mental well being of the patient – encourage a cheerful and confident outlook towards her confinement and so to help herself effectively during labour’. Pre-natal training included education, stretching, relaxing, and deep breathing with many free arm movements to improve circulation. The daily home exercises were designed to improve muscle tone, increase flexibility, and control of movement. The post-natal exercises were designed to improve the condition of relaxed muscles, in particular the abdominal muscles, so that the figure is restored to normal after confinement.26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar] As a reflection of the women’s suffrage movement, Randell encouraged female students to use their knowledge and healthy physical ability to gain self-empowerment and help others to do the same. She encouraged women to teach spouses to perform and to teach the exercises calmly and confidently; to reinforce the teamwork between parents and to be of practical assistance during childbirth.25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar]
Physical activity is beneficial for young people, who are naturally primed to soak up its rewards. The reality is that the majority of today’s youths, however, fall into one of two camps: Either they are athletes, engaging in one or many sports (as well as auxiliary training such as weightlifting and agility work, which can help create lifelong fitness habits) or they are sedentary.
FEDERAL LAW PROHIBITS ANYONE BUT REGISTERED USERS WITH HEARING LOSS FROM USING INTERNET PROTOCOL (IP) CAPTIONED TELEPHONES WITH THE CAPTIONS TURNED ON. IP Captioned Telephone Service may use a live operator. The operator generates captions of what the other party to the call says. These captions are then sent to your phone. There is a cost for each minute of captions generated, paid from a federally administered fund. No cost is passed on to the CapTel user for using the service. (v5.4 7-18)
"Consider this: Dr. Kenneth Cooper (author of Aerobics, The New Aerobics, Aerobics for Women), the U.S. Air Force Cardiologist who coined the term 'aerobics" (meaning a form of exercise) and has promoted their use for over 25 years, now admits that he was wrong! According to Dr. Cooper, further research has shown that there is no correlation between aerobic endurance performance and health, longevity, or protection against heart disease. He will admit, however, that such activities do carry with them a great risk of injury. Further, he admits that gross-overuse activities such as running are damaging to the body." – Ken Hutchins, SuperSlow Exercise Guild
To qualify for inclusion, studies had to be level 1 or level 2 (randomized controlled trials); had to compare rehabilitation interventions, such as exercise or manual therapy, with other treatments or placebo; had to include validated outcome measures of pain, function, or disability; and had to be limited to individuals with diagnosed impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome was determined by a positive impingement sign per Neer or Hawkins criteria, or both. Articles were excluded if they addressed other shoulder conditions (eg, calcific tendinosis, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, adhesive capsulitis, osteoarthritis), addressed postoperative management, were retrospective studies or case series, or used other outcome measures.

During your workout you have “target” heart rate zones that are expressed as a percentage of your max heart rate. For low-intensity cardio, you want to aim for 60 to 70 percent of your max heart rate, for moderate-intensity cardio the goal is 70 to 85 percent, and for high-intensity cardio, 85 percent or above. This can help you see if you’re really working as hard as you think you are and adjust as needed to make sure you’re hitting your workout goals. Here’s how to calculate your max and target heart rate zones.


Between August 2012 and June 2013, all men and women born between years 1936 to 1942 (aged 70–77 years), with a permanent address in the municipality of Trondheim, Norway, were invited to participate in a randomized controlled trial, the Generation 100 study. The primary aim of Generation 100 is to determine the effect of five years of exercise training on morbidity and mortality. The Generation 100 study protocol and study sample characteristics have been published previously [19].
Sometimes the terms 'dynamic' and 'static' are used.[citation needed] 'Dynamic' exercises such as steady running, tend to produce a lowering of the diastolic blood pressure during exercise, due to the improved blood flow. Conversely, static exercise (such as weight-lifting) can cause the systolic pressure to rise significantly, albeit transiently, during the performance of the exercise.[8]

The bent-over row is performed while leaning over, holding a weight hanging down in one hand or both hands, by pulling it up towards the abdomen. This is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. The torso is unsupported in some variants of this exercise, in which case lifting belts are often used to help support the lower back.
Planning and preparation are important when you're getting started with exercise, but to be successful, you also need momentum—and the more you can create, the easier it is to stay motivated. The best way to build and maintain momentum is with action. While it's great to ponder your weight-loss goals, think about motivation, and work on your commitment to exercise, there's something to be said for just doing it—before too much contemplation drains your energy. It's easy to spend too much time researching, reading, and exploring rather than actually doing the exercise.
One of the easiest parts of starting an exercise program is deciding to do it. Usually there's something inspiring you to make a change: Maybe you tried on a pair of jeans that were too tight or there's an upcoming event—a reunion, wedding, or party—where you're going to see people you haven't seen in a while. Whatever it is, you're motivated, you're excited, and the fantasy of a new, slimmer you is enough to inspire you.
Workouts are an extremely efficient experience for our clients. You will be in and out in less than 30 minutes. You will come in no more than twice per week. Don't worry, that's all the time we need to target all major muscle groups and the cardiovascular system. Our instructors set up the equipment, keep detailed notes, and guide our clients through every step of the workout.
This move requires a great deal of strength, balance and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: Start by standing on one leg. The opposite leg can be held out in front of your body with your hands on the non-working leg. Think about rooting your foot into the ground while you squat down and back so that the glutes pass below parallel. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves.

The snatch is one of the two current olympic weightlifting events (the other being the clean and jerk). The essence of the event is to lift a barbell from the platform to locked arms overhead in a smooth continuous movement. The barbell is pulled as high as the lifter can manage (typically to mid [ chest] height) (the pull) at which point the barbell is flipped overhead. With relatively light weights (as in the "power snatch") locking of the arms may not require rebending the knees. However, as performed in contests, the weight is always heavy enough to demand that the lifter receive the bar in a squatting position, while at the same time flipping the weight so it moves in an arc directly overhead to locked arms. When the lifter is secure in this position, he rises (overhead squat), completing the lift.
At the twilight of his career, despite his personal success and loyal group of followers, Pilates was disappointed his philosophy was not adopted by all. However, a group of his followers became recognized mind–body educators in their own right. His dream was realized by them in the 1980s, when Contrology moved into and has since remained within mainstream acceptance and popularity as ‘Pilates.’39,42 Balanced Body, Inc. [Internet]. Origins of Pilates. 2015 Aug 30 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.pilates.com/BBAPP/V/pilates/origins-of-pilates.html.
For today's workout, you'll go through the following eight yoga poses, holding each for 3 to 5 breaths. Do the workout anytime you like—it will refresh you in the morning and help you unwind before bed. Take your time when performing each exercise and focus on your breath: Breath in and out through the nose, taking the air in through the back of your throat. Do each pose at least once, twice or more if you have time.

Also, my favorite workouts might not be yours. “It's like asking someone for the best musician, or the best craft beer,” says Daniel Freedman, co-founder of online fitness site, BurnAlong. He recommends trying several of the apps out to see which one works best for you. “Who is going to inspire you?” Freedman says, “find who you'll stick with week in and week out.”
Another very important brain area that mediates, and in turn is affected by the stress response, is the hippocampus.27 The consequences of impaired regulation of cortisol secretion are manifold, ranging from effects in peripheral tissues (eg, osteoporosis) to changes in the central nervous system.28 Most of the effects seen in chronic stress situations can be explained by the occupation of the two glucocorticoid receptors in the brain. In normal situations, the mineralocorticoid receptor will be occupied, whereas the glucocorticoid receptor has lower affinity for the natural ligand corticosterone (cortisol) than the mineralocorticoid receptor and is extensively activated only after stress and at the peaks of the circadian rhythm. One of the main functions of glucocorticoid receptors is to normalise brain activity some hours after an organism has been exposed to a stressful event and to promote consolidation of the event for future use.25 28 To this purpose, corticosteroids feed back in precisely those circuits that are initially activated by the stressor and are enriched in glucocorticoid receptors: limbic forebrain neurons and the paraventricular nucleus of the hypothalamus.
The Bloom Method is for every woman preparing for pregnancy, currently expecting, or even years postnatal. A variation of our techniques can be beneficial to everyone regardless of your fitness level or the vision you have for your birth. The Bloom Method is here to support each of you during your life-altering experience while providing you with simple and effective techniques that you can apply to your life no matter what your day to day looks like. We make it easy and doable for you, so that you can focus on being a mother, a friend, a partner and anything else life demands of you. We’ve got you’re back and your core for that matter, trust us, after all, this entire mehthod was created with you in mind.
Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
^ Jump up to: a b Wilkinson DJ, Hossain T, Hill DS, Phillips BE, Crossland H, Williams J, Loughna P, Churchward-Venne TA, Breen L, Phillips SM, Etheridge T, Rathmacher JA, Smith K, Szewczyk NJ, Atherton PJ (June 2013). "Effects of leucine and its metabolite β-hydroxy-β-methylbutyrate on human skeletal muscle protein metabolism" (PDF). J. Physiol. 591 (11): 2911–2923. doi:10.1113/jphysiol.2013.253203. PMC 3690694. PMID 23551944. Retrieved 27 May 2016.
Doonya describes itself as “your at-home solution for fun dance-fitness!” Bring the energy and dance of Bollywood straight to your living room with this cardio workout. With loads of energy, Doonya co-founders Kajal Desai and Priya Pandya give you a taste of their high-powered dance routines with this four-minute video that’ll leave you sweating in no time. You’ll definitely need some coordination to complete this routine, but it’s great for beginners.
Angular velocity of the pre and post isokinetic maximal voluntary contraction (MVC) of the knee extensors (KE) tests were randomized between sessions (60-100-140 deg/s, 100-140-60 deg/s or 140-60-100 deg/s). One isometric MVC of the knee flexors was also performed pre and post exercise, 20 s following completion of the last KE MVC. Post tests were performed either shortly after exhaustion (13 ± 4 s), 20 s following exhaustion (P20) or 40 s following exhaustion (P40).

One almost overall finding, at least in endurance and strengthendurance athletes having OTS, is a diminished maximal lactate concentration, whereas submaximal values remain unchanged or slightly reduced.10 12 This is confirmed in the present study where OTS patients did not reach maximal lactate concentrations above 8 mmol l−1. Two out of the four NFO patients did not reach [La]max of 8 mmol l−1 at the first exercise test either (for one patient [La]max was missing). Thus, although low [La]max has frequently been described as a diagnostic marker for OTS, from these results, it does not seem sensitive enough to distinguish OTS from NFO.
This study was supported by grants from the Liaison Committee for education, research and innovation in Central Norway, The K.G Jebsen Foundation for medical research and the Research Council of Norway. The funding organizations had no role in the design and execution of the study, in the collection, analysis, and interpretation of the data, or in the preparation, review or approval of the submitted manuscript.
Each reliability session took place on a Monday, Wednesday and Friday morning at the same time and within the same week. All subjects were given written instructions to drink 35 ml of water per kilogram of body weight, sleep for at least 7 h, refrain from the consumption of alcohol, and avoid any vigorous exercise the day before each visit. Participants were also instructed to avoid any caffeine and nicotine for at least 3 h before testing. Finally, subjects were instructed to consume a set breakfast (2 slices of toast spread with margarine or butter, 250 ml of orange juice, and a banana) 1 h before all testing sessions. At each visit to the lab, subjects were asked to complete a pre-test checklist to ascertain that they had complied with the instructions given to them, and were asked to report any pain or soreness experienced in their leg (to check for the presence of previous session-induced muscle damage). None of our subjects reported leg muscle pain or soreness at the beginning of each session.
The most important thing you need is you. Just grab a yoga mat, water, and towel and find a space wide enough to take a step in each direction. The PiYo 60-Day Calendar comes with the program and strategically lays out your workout schedule to keep you progressing each week as you build your strength, flexibility, and stamina. The Get Lean Eating Plan gives you a simplified approach to clean and lean eating designed to fit your lifestyle.
“The best exercise you can do if you only have 30 seconds each day is to learn and practice diaphragmatic breathing,” explains Carla Chickedantz, a personal trainer with Crunch gyms. “Diaphragmatic breathing is the most basic, original strength building technique that each and every human uses to build core strength as a newborn baby. As adults, we lose this skill and rely on auxiliary muscles in the chest, shoulders, and neck for respiration. This causes all sorts of problems. During our workouts, we often focus on the front, back and sides of the core, and neglect the top and bottom. Yes, the core is like a canister with the diaphragm at the top and pelvic floor at the bottom.”
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
×