Dancer, choreographer, stunt woman and fitness expert Kelly Connolly says you can shrink your waist in 30 seconds a day with “salsa swivels.” “It’s no secret that dancing is a great way to trim down and tone without even realizing you’re exercising,” she says. “The high energy and twisting motions of Salsa dancing can have a significant impact on your body while giving you some new moves to take to the dance floor.”
One of the rotator cuff strengthening exercises proposed by Kuhn is scaption performed with the thumb down or up. Clinically, this exercise is called the empty-can (thumb-down) or full-can (thumb-up) exercise. When prescribing this strengthening exercise, one should consider the effect that upper extremity position has on the tissues located in the subacromial space. Yanai et al4 showed that impingement forces on the rotator cuff tendons under the coracoacromial ligament were greater with the empty-can exercise than with the full-can exercise. Therefore, the full-can exercise is more appropriate for this patient population.

I saw the commercial for this program a few years ago on TV and laughed when it came on. I thought it was just another one of those infomercials that advertised something unattainable and absolutely ridiculous. Who could possibly get ripped by working out in their living room for an hour a day? Well, let's fast forward 3 years later to 2011 and I certainly wasn't laughing anymore. During my college years I managed to pack on 50 pounds of extra weight that needed to come off. So, I went on a diet and started working out at the local gym. Well, that whole gym thing didn't last long. Between gas prices and the membership cost, I just wasn't feeling it. While venting to one of my friends, he suggested that I do P90x. Needless to say he received an eyebrow raise from me. Fast forward another 2 weeks later ... full review

The link between physical health and exercise (or lack of it) was further established in 1949 and reported in 1953 by a team led by Jerry Morris.[147][148] Dr. Morris noted that men of similar social class and occupation (bus conductors versus bus drivers) had markedly different rates of heart attacks, depending on the level of exercise they got: bus drivers had a sedentary occupation and a higher incidence of heart disease, while bus conductors were forced to move continually and had a lower incidence of heart disease.[148]
Trainer Natalie Uhling is all about the tried and true burpee for full body conditioning in 30 seconds—though she recommends three sets of 30-second burpees with a 15-second break between sets. For “quality” burpees, she says to do the following: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart and a slight bend in your knees; make sure that you are not pushing through the toes of your feet but you are starting centered. As you jump, remember to land softly because you want to protect your joints. When you make your way down to the plank position, make sure your core is protected, that means keep your hips square and your butt out of the sky.
It is well known that exercise in the older population may prevent several diseases [1–4]. Reduced physical activity impairs the quality of life in elderly people with Alzheimer's Disease [4], Parkinson's Disease [5], and Depressive Disorders [6]. Moreover, musculoskeletal, cardiopulmonary, and cerebrovascular decline are associated with poor physical fitness because of the cumulative effects of illness, multiple drug intake, fatigue, and bed rest [7, 8]. The effects of physical activity and exercise programs on fitness and health-related quality of life (HRQOL) in elderly adults have been widely studied by several authors [9–11]. De Vries et al. [11] conducted a meta-analysis focusing on elderly patients with mobility problems and/or multimorbidity. Eighteen articles describing a wide variety of actions were analyzed. Most used a multicomponent training program focusing on the combination of strength, balance, and endurance training. In 9 of the 18 studies included, interventions were supervised by a physical therapist. Intensity of the intervention was not reported and the duration of the intervention varied from 5 weeks to 18 months. This meta-analysis concluded that, considering quality of life, the exercise versus no-exercise studies found no significant effects. High-intensity exercise appears to be somewhat more effective in improving physical functioning than low-intensity exercise. These positive effects are of great value in the patient population but the most effective type of intervention remains unclear. Brovold et al. [7] recently examined the effects of high-intensity training versus home-based exercise programs using the Norwegian Ullevaal Model [12] on a group of over-65-year-olds after discharge from hospital. These authors based their study on the Swedish Friskis-Svettis model [13] which was designed by Johan Holmsater for patients with coronaropathy to promote their return to work and everyday activities and improve their prognoses. This model includes three intervals of high intensity and two intervals of moderate intensity, each one lasting for 5 to 10 minutes. Included in each is coordination. Exercises consist of simple aerobic dance movements and involve the use of both upper and lower extremities to challenge postural control [13]. Exercise intensity was adjusted using the Borg Rating of Perceived Exertion (RPE) Scale. Moderate intensity was set between 11 and 13, and high intensity was set between 15 and 17 on the Borg Scale.
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