Jane Fonda’s Original Workout. The original. The classic. The one and only. Jane Fonda! Throwback your fitness routine (and break out the leg warmers!) with a workout video from this ‘80s exercise genius. Fonda will take you through aerobics, strength, and flexibility movements with options for beginners and advanced. The video is available for $9.99.
SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine web site. Michael R. Bracko, EdD, FACSM, chairman, American College of Sports Medicine's Consumer Information Committee. Rita Redberg, MSc, chairwoman, American Heart Association's Scientific Advisory Board for the Choose to Move program. Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief exercise physiologist, American Council on Exercise. Stephanie Siegrist, MD, orthopedic surgeon, Rochester, N.Y. Sal Fichera, exercise physiologist; owner, Forza Fitness, New York.
Back in mid-century America, you did old-style sit-ups, which were once regarded as the gold standard of iron-gut, military discipline. Maybe they still are, so if your idea of "manly" is messing up your lower back, go for it. But few fitness trainers recommend old-style sit-ups, though there are some re-conceptualized versions of them that might work for you.
Several exercises from Week 1 are carried over to Week 2, but one move is added to each bodypart routine—with the exception of abs—so you can train all muscle groups more completely from multiple angles. Chest, for example, includes two exercises: One is a compound movement (dumbbell bench press) that involves multiple joints (both the shoulder and elbow) to work the largest amount of muscle possible, and the other is an isolation exercise (dumbbell flye) that involves only one joint (shoulder) and targets the pecs to a greater extent. (When doing presses for chest, the deltoids and triceps are involved to a degree, meaning presses don’t isolate the pecs as much as flyes do.)
Upgrading physical fitness is a metabolically expensive process that requires sufficient time. After a "request" that adaptive changes be made, the human body needs recovery time to effect those changes, and for repair and replenishment. Exercising too often serves only to interrupt the recovery phase, further drain bodily resources, and hinders improved physical fitness. Exercising once every seven days is enough exercise to improve and maintain your level of fitness. More is not necessarily better when it comes to exercise... more is better when it comes to recovery. Think about it, since you don't know the precise moment recovery is completely finished, you will work out again either before recovery is done or after it is done. Common sense would dictate that it's better to wait until recovery is definitely finished before another intense workout is performed, which means you should be working out after you're done recovering. If you work out a few days before you should have, you will interfere with your recovery. If you work out a few days after you could have, you will not lose anything you've gained thus far.

Whenever I’m feeling overwhelmed and super busy, the first thing that always falls off my schedule is hitting the gym—even though I know making the extra time to sweat it out will make me feel better and more centered. But I’ve realized that you can always find a way to prioritize the things that matter, even if you have to get creative with the way you fit them in.
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
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