It takes the gastrointestinal tract about 3 to 4 hours to completely digest a full meal. Note too that the digestion phase varies between what you are eating -- for example if you ate a banana, you can exercise after 30 minutes or 1 hour after eating it but if you ate a steak, it would take you about 3 hours before it would be good to begin exercise. That said, most people find that eating trail mix mid-hike doesn't prevent them from continuing to walk, as human beings were built to eat and move.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.

Along with prenatal vitamins and regular doctor’s appointment, The Bloom Method should be an essential part of your prenatal experience. Brooke’s knowledge and passion for pre and postnatal health and wellness is unmatched. Thanks to the regular workouts and the prenatal exercises that Brooke taught me, I feel amazing. The Bloom Method is a fundamental investment in baby and mommy’s health.

We not only offer a superior training protocol, SMX also uses state-of-the-art training tools. The majority of our equipment is MEDX Rehabilitative Exercise Equipment, one of the most respected and technologically-advanced fitness, sports, and medical/rehabilitation equipment brands. MedX products are developed through decades of experience and millions of dollars in independent, university-based research. MedX equipment achieves training efficiency through resistance curves matched to tested and proven strength profiles. They operate at a very low level of friction and offer a choice of resistance in 2-pound increments, ensuring a weight that is just right – not too heavy and not too light – for rapid and steady progress. We have also incorporated select Nautilus equipment. Nautilus is considered the gold standard in fitness and a cornerstone of the modern commercial gym.
(3) Recovery Phase (<60% HRR). Postural control and spine mobility exercises in a quadrupedal position with the platform support, exercises of static balance over either 4 or 2 supports, eyes either open or closed, and with core muscle activation. The latter phase also included various poststretch exercises to restore the preexercise muscle length.

ShapeFit.com is dedicated to providing health and fitness information to people so they can live a healthy lifestyle. ShapeFit has thousands of pages of fitness content with fun and interactive tools to help our visitors lose body fat, build lean muscle and increase their energy levels. We wish you great success in reaching your health and fitness goals!


^ Jump up to: a b c Paillard T, Rolland Y, de Souto Barreto P (July 2015). "Protective Effects of Physical Exercise in Alzheimer's Disease and Parkinson's Disease: A Narrative Review". J Clin Neurol. 11 (3): 212–219. doi:10.3988/jcn.2015.11.3.212. PMC 4507374. PMID 26174783. Aerobic physical exercise (PE) activates the release of neurotrophic factors and promotes angiogenesis, thereby facilitating neurogenesis and synaptogenesis, which in turn improve memory and cognitive functions. ... Exercise limits the alteration in dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra and contributes to optimal functioning of the basal ganglia involved in motor commands and control by adaptive mechanisms involving dopamine and glutamate neurotransmission.
More recently, exercise was regarded as a beneficial force in the 19th century. After 1860, Archibald MacLaren opened a gymnasium at the University of Oxford and instituted a training regimen for 12 military officials at the university. This regimen was later assimilated into the training of the British Army.[145] Several mass exercise movements were started in the early twentieth century as well. The first and most significant of these in the UK was the Women's League of Health and Beauty, founded in 1930 by Mary Bagot Stack, that had 166,000 members in 1937.[146]
Pilates, yoga and barre all provide an effective workout from which you will see positive physical results. All will help to sculpt and tone your muscles and improve your overall health. Maybe you want to increase your flexibility or cardiovascular endurance, or perhaps you want to tone your muscles without bulking up or you’re favoring a past or present injury. Maybe you want to improve your core strength and posture. An awareness of your present fitness levels and future goals can help you decide which workout method will benefit you the most.
Stability moves train your core to stay strong and steady. They also target your transverse abdominis, the deep ab muscle that does a 360 around your waist and draws it in, says Brent Brookbush, president of the Brookbush Institute of Human Movement Science in New York City. Try this stabilizer: Hold a dumbbell in your right hand and balance on your left leg. Squat on your left leg as you lower the weight toward your left foot. (More moves to try: grab a Bosu ball and challenge your core with this stability workout. Or you can snag one of these balance boards to work on your core as you watch your favorite TV show.)
“I always tell people that you want to learn why you’re doing something—knowing a bunch of moves doesn’t matter as much when don’t you know how to implement them,” explains Cori Lefkowith, Orange County-based personal trainer and founder of Redefining Strength. So even if you’ve got planks and push-ups down, understanding what’s really going on while you’re training can help you reach your goals faster. We’ve decoded 25 common fitness terms for you so that you can work out with confidence and get the most out of your fitness routine.
You’ll begin the program with a full-body training split, meaning you’ll train all major bodyparts in each workout (as opposed to “splitting up” your training). Train three days this first week, performing just one exercise per bodypart in each session. It’s important that you have a day of rest between each workout to allow your body to recover; this makes training Monday, Wednesday and Friday—with Saturday and Sunday being rest days—a good approach.
In London, the Medical Officer of Thorpe Coombe maternity hospital approved and implemented the St Thomas method in 1940, presented as ‘Training for Childbirth - and After.’26 Wellcome Library [Internet]. Rodway H. Training for childbirth - and after (1940). 2015 Sep 24 [cited 2015 Oct 3]. Available from: http://wellcomelibrary.org/player/b16729006#?asi=0&ai=0. [Google Scholar] There was also interest from the USA, but this option did not materialize.29 Sydney Morning Herald [Internet]. Thomas BM: Obituary (1940). 2014 Oct 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.tiveyfamilytree.com/Barbara-Mortimer-Thomas-Death-Article-SMH-11-9-1940.htm. [Google Scholar]

Walking was the most common exercise type in both training groups (Fig. 3). Compared to HIIT, MCT had a significantly higher proportion of sessions with walking and resistance training. Contrary, compared to MCT, HIIT had a higher proportion of sessions with cycling, combined endurance and resistance training, other types of endurance training (e.g. aerobic, treadmill), jogging, swimming and dancing. There were no group differences regarding cross-country skiing and domestic activities (e.g. housework, gardening) (Fig. 3).
So you think you can't dance? Now you can—and get "a good cardio workout," one reviewer said, to boot. You'll quickly love the hip-hop mix that makes up the 45-minute sesh in Groov3's Dance Sweat Live. The easy-to-learn choreography is broken down step-by-step for newbies before each sequence, "which allows you to gain confidence in your dancing as if nobody's watching" but hustles along so that "you're sweating" by the time you get into the rhythm.
^ Jump up to: a b Cooney GM, Dwan K, Greig CA, Lawlor DA, Rimer J, Waugh FR, McMurdo M, Mead GE (September 2013). "Exercise for depression". Cochrane Database Syst. Rev. 9 (9): CD004366. doi:10.1002/14651858.CD004366.pub6. PMID 24026850. Exercise is moderately more effective than a control intervention for reducing symptoms of depression, but analysis of methodologically robust trials only shows a smaller effect in favour of exercise. When compared to psychological or pharmacological therapies, exercise appears to be no more effective, though this conclusion is based on a few small trials.
Pharmacologic beta-adrenergic blockade reduces maximal heart rate (HR) during exercise but variable results have been reported for minute ventilation (VE), CO2 output (VCO2), and O2 uptake (VO2). A total group of 19 subjects with mild asthma was studied. We studied 16 subjects from the group who received placebo or pindolol, a beta-adrenergic antagonist, during 1-min incremental exercise on a ... [Show full abstract]Read more
The goal in training competitive athletes is to provide training loads that are effective in improving performance. At some stages during the training process, athletes may experience an unexplainable decrease in performance. This might happen when prolonged excessive training takes place concurrent with other stressors and insufficient recovery. This unexplainable performance decrements can result in chronic maladaptations that can lead to the overtraining syndrome (OTS). A keyword in the recognition of OTS might be “prolonged maladaptation” not only of the athletic performance but also of several biological, neurochemical and hormonal regulation mechanisms. When athletes deliberately use a short-term period (eg, training camp) to increase training load, they can experience short-term performance decrement, without severe psychological or lasting other negative symptoms.1 2 This functional over reaching (FO) will eventually lead to an improvement in performance after recovery. However, when athletes do not sufficiently respect the balance between training and recovery, non-functional over-reaching (NFO) can occur.1 2 At this stage, the first signs and symptoms of prolonged maladaptation such as performance decrements, psychological disturbance (decreased vigour, increased fatigue) and hormonal disturbances are present, and the athlete will need weeks or months to recover. The distinction between NFO and OTS is very difficult and will depend on the clinical outcome and exclusion diagnosis.
One way repeated ANOVAs (time: isotime from first to seventh minute and exhaustion) were used to test the time course of EMG RMS for all muscles, leg RPE, leg muscle pain and heart rate. Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (1st minute vs other time points, exhaustion vs other time points) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction.
3.  Move v-e-r-y s-l-o-w-l-y but smoothly. "Explosive" movement is not only nonproductive, but also dangerous. Plus, moving slowly eliminates momentum, which ensures constant muscle loading. Make a movement last about ten seconds. (A chin-up should take about ten seconds from the lowest to the highest point, and then another ten seconds from the highest to the lowest point. Same goes for a push-up.) There is nothing to be gained from fast movements. Moving slowly prevents injury. (There are over 30 million exercise related injuries annually in this country; most of these can no doubt be attributed to high-force movement.) Keep your movements low-force and high-intensity. An analogy: If you attempt to lift your car quickly, you will likely injure yourself even if using proper form. If you try lifting it slowly and intensely, your chances of injury are nil. Think of how you drive your car over speed bumps... fast will cause damage to the car's suspension, slow will not.

Ken Hutchins' analysis is not just book theory; it is based on real experience training many, many thousands of subjects over a span of decades. He trained everyone from amateur and professional level athletes and bodybuilders to little old ladies with osteoporosis and also a great many genetically normal/average folks. He assisted Arthur Jones and Ellington Darden at Nautilus Sports Medical Industries where he first refined the Superslow method during a 5 years long clinical trial, the Nautilus Osteoporosis Study at The University of Florida Medical School in Gainesville (the study is mentioned in chapter 8 of the 1990 edition of "The Nautilus Book" by Ellington Darden, a book I highly recommend for beginning HIT practitioners). Hutchins' writing is as dry and clinical as one would expect to find in any textbook about medicine or engineering. It is also filled with rich insight into the intellectual processes and long history of carefully controlled experiments at Nautilus (and later Hutchins' own facilities) that brought Ken Hutchins to his current level of knowledge. His understanding of anatomy, biology, physics, engineering, psychology, history and sociology are all put to good use in this book and should enthrall any reader that possesses solid critical-thinking skills. Understanding the arguments for a distinction of "Exercise vs. Recreation", "The First Definition of Exercise" and "Requirements for Functional Ability" are crucial for everyone that cares even the slightest about the subject of human health, fitness, longevity or quality of life. These are not trivial matters.
I recommend the Swanson Enhanced Pqq with Ubiquinol CoQ10 for a good and yet cost effective quality. Another high quality brand is Life Extension at a higher cost usually. These are the two brands we have used and I do believe Swanson is the best in quality and cost, however, if you are already using Co-Q10 Ubiquinol in another brand, that is great, continue doing what works. 

Exercising stock options should not be a passive event that happens after a given amount of time. It's rather like playing a hand of cards: if your plays are strategic, you'll probably "know when to hold them and when to fold them." Many alternatives and trade-offs need to be considered. But, as always, rules, requirements, and regulations govern this area, and this is where we begin.
Sensitivity of ACTH and PRL for the detection of OTS was four out of four and five out of five, respectively (table 2; cutoff, 200% at the second exercise test) and for the detection of NFO was four out of five and three out of three, respectively. Sensitivity of cortisol (cutoff, 200% at the second test) and GH (cutoff, 1000%) for the detection of OTS was four out of five and two out of five, and for the detection of NFO, one out of five and two out of four, respectively (table 2).
Your body clock, that is. Try to work out at the time you have the most energy, suggests Jason Theodosakis, MD, exercise physiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. If you're a morning person, schedule your fitness activities early in the day; if you perk up as the day goes along, plan your activities in the afternoon or evening.
Flexibility is a factor in yoga, but it is not a necessary for beginner classes. Continued practice over time will increase your agility and flexibility. You can see positive results over time even if you only attend an hour a week, but attending classes around 2-3 times per week will help you experience the most benefits. Yoga classes usually last around an hour from warm-up to cool down.

We were looking for something a bit more 'sophisticated' than the brightly colored tiles for our living room area where the kids play and we entertain. They are good quality, and because they are reversible, we were able to design more of a 'rug' look, rather thana being stuck with the regular checkerboard pattern with std tiles. These are a great value!
Exercise is a key part of staying healthy, but figuring out how to get more active can be tough. If you’re not used to physical activity, start slow. Go for 10 to 15 minute walks, and work your way up to briskly walking or jogging for 30 minutes daily. Try adding strengthening exercises 2 or 3 days per week, and consider boosting your flexibility with yoga or Pilates classes. Whenever you work out, always listen to your body’s limits, and ask your doctor for advice if you have a history of any medical issues.

It’s not an exact science, but when you hear the term plyometric, you can go ahead and think jumping and breathlessness. Examples would include squat jumps, box jumps, broad jumps, and burpees. One of the main purposes of these explosive exercises is increasing power, says Laferrera. Having more power means you can recruit muscle fiber faster and more efficiently, which pays off when you’re moving heavy objects or working on sprinting drills in the gym, adds Lefkowith. Plus, because these moves get your heart rate up, they’re big calorie-burners. Here are seven plyometric moves you can do at home.
The overhead squat requires strength and flexibility. HOW TO DO IT: You can take the bar from a squat rack by snatching it overhead or by cleaning and jerking it. The arms should be wider on the bar, very similar to a snatch grip. The feet should be a little outside of shoulder-width. Brace your core, and send your butt back into a squat position while keeping your arms locked overhead. A good cue to think of is “show me your pits” or bending the bar, which automatically externally rotates the shoulders and locks them into a strong position. Once you have reached below parallel, drive your knees out, squeeze your glutes and stand the bar back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings, calves, core, shoulders and back.
Rock climbing is one of the most physically challenging sports, testing strength, endurance, flexibility, and stamina. Good climbers have to build and maintain each of these assets. This is revised and updated edition of the classic book, Conditioning for Climbers, provides climbers of all ages and experience with the knowledge and tools to design and follow a comprehensive, personalized exercise program.
Exercise Videos and DVDs are a popular way people work out every day. There are a massive amount of exercise videos available that target all kinds of fitness goals. Trying to figure out which exercise videos are the best can be a real challenge. Our information can help. With all of the choices available is very easy to get overwhelmed and frustrated when you’re trying to figure out which videos are going to give you the results you are looking for. We’ve done a lot of research on the internet and studied professional fitness individuals and have compiled an exercise videos review that will take the guesswork out of which videos are the best and will help you narrow down the choices and decide on videos that will help you reach your goals.
The second aim of this study was to describe the isokinetic muscle fatigue induced by high intensity OLDE and its recovery. Firstly, the absence of isometric KF MVC torque decrease confirms that our exercise only solicits the knee extensors and does not involve the knee flexors. Secondly, EMG RMS measured during KE MVCs shortly after exhaustion and during the recovery period was not altered by high intensity OLDE, confirming the results of a previous study [8]. Therefore, as a decrease in knee extensors force production capacity can be observed without concomitant changes in EMG signal, our data combined with the data of a previous study [8] suggest that EMG signal cannot be used to investigate dynamic exercise-induced muscle fatigue. The lack of changes in EMG signal is likely to be caused by a potentiation of the maximal evoked muscular wave (M-wave) induced by high intensity OLDE [8]. Finally, according to our hypothesis, isokinetic KE MVC torque quickly recovered and plateaued after exhaustion (within ~ 30 s at 60 and 100 deg/s, and within ~ 50 s at 140 deg/s). This quick recovery in torque production capacity is likely to be associated with recovery in both central and peripheral fatigue. This assumption is supported by one previous study in our laboratory demonstrating that not only peripheral and central fatigue, but also cortical and spinal excitability recovered shortly after exhaustion [8]. Froyd et al. [32] also demonstrated a significant recovery in skeletal muscle function within 1–2 minutes after completion of a one-leg isokinetic time trial performed at high intensity. Taking all together, these results demonstrate that to fully appreciate the extent of neuromuscular alterations induced by high intensity dynamic exercise, assessment of muscle fatigue must be performed within 30 s of cessation of the exercise.
In the present study, we measured muscle endurance by completion of time to exhaustion tests where the subject has to maintain a fix workload for as long as possible. All time to exhaustion tests lasted less than ten minutes, confirming that OLDE was performed at high intensity. The duration of the time to exhaustion tests in the present study is in accordance with previous studies using the same exercise on a different ergometer [11, 17, 18]. Relative reliability refers to the degree to which individuals maintain their position in a sample with repeated measurements [30]. The ICC value of 0.795 can be interpreted as a questionable reliability (ICC < 0.8), close to the threshold for good reliability (0.8 < ICC < 0.9) [19]. However, as no consensus really exists on threshold to interpret ICC results [31], the practical significance of its value has to be determined with caution by the readers according to their future use of the present protocol. Absolute reliability refers to the degree to which repeated measurements vary for individuals [30]. Traditionally, time to exhaustion tests are known to present a greater CV (CV > 10%) than time trials (i.e. subjects has to perform the greater amount of work possible in a fixed time/distance; CV < 5%) [20]. Interestingly, in our study the CV is below 10%, confirming the great reliability of our novel high intensity OLDE protocol to measure muscle endurance, this despite the small sample size, chosen to be in accordance with previously published studies using the same protocol [8, 11, 17]. This great reliability is confirmed by the typical error of measurement value of 0.30 min, corresponding to 5% of the averaged performance value. Finally, as the typical error of measurement value was slightly above the smallest worthwhile change calculated (0.28 min), it is unlikely that our novel high intensity OLDE protocol can be used to detect small differences in performance.
In summary, if you're only interested in a basic understanding of HIT methodology and where much of it originated I would suggest starting with a far less technical book. I suggest starting with the last published edition of Ellington Darden's "The Nautilus Book" and perhaps "Total Fitness: The Nautilus Way". If you like what you read and want to dig a little deeper into the evolution of HIT read Darden's more recent book, "The New High Intensity Training: The Best Muscle-Building System You've Never Tried". If the gears in your head are in high gear after that and you really want to get DEEP into what evolved from the original Nautilus protocol _then_ you go for "Superslow" or preferably "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume 1". When your grasp of all the aforementioned material is truly solid then move on to Doug McGuff's writing. McGuff's ideas do not surpass or supplant Hutchins' but rather sharpen the points with brilliant thoughts and clinical observations from a medical physician's perspective. Doug McGuff, MD published his "Ultimate Exercise: Bulletin #1" in the late 90's and later updated that with "Body by Science: A Research Based Program to Get the Results You Want in 12 Minutes a Week", both of which are hugely valuable contributions to the literature on HIT methodology and philosophy. His article about "Stoicism in Training" is critical reading.
If you don't have access to weights, then you can perform resistance exercises utilizing just the weight of your own body. These types of exercises include pull ups, push ups, crunches, squats, and lunges. If you'd like to find a well designed workout using body weight resistance, try the Slow Burn Fitness Revolution, which relies on slow movements to really increase intensity as you perform isotonic exercises.
Wildman S. Kafka's Calisthenics. Slate [Internet]. 2011 Jan 21 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: http://www.slate.com/articles/life/fitness/2011/01/kafkas_calisthenics.html.  He was conferred a knighthood by the King of Denmark in 1919 and his work was granted patronage by the Prince of Wales in 1925.15,16 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904.
Olympic soccer medalist and Fit As A Pro star Lauren Sesselmann is a big fan of the “running pyramid” for 30 seconds. “It’s a mix of cardio and balance that works your whole body. You count from one to ten then ten back down to one with high knees until 30 seconds is up,” she says. “Aim to get your knees up to hip height. Raise right knee, pause. Then raise left knee, followed quickly by the right knee and pause with the right knee still up high. Then do three knees fast and pause.” Continue till you’ve done ten high knees and then back it down to the beginning. The pause will allow you to work on your balance because you are landing quickly with one knee in the air and one the leg on the ground.
Continuous aerobic exercise can induce a transient state of euphoria, colloquially known as a "runner's high" in distance running or a "rower's high" in crew, through the increased biosynthesis of at least three euphoriant neurochemicals: anandamide (an endocannabinoid),[73] β-endorphin (an endogenous opioid),[74] and phenethylamine (a trace amine and amphetamine analog).[75][76][77]
The bench press or dumbbell bench-press is performed while lying face up on a bench, by pushing a weight away from the chest. This is a compound exercise that also involves the triceps and the front deltoids, also recruits the upper and lower back muscles, and traps. The bench press is the king of all upper body exercises and is one of the most popular chest exercises in the world. It is the final exercise in 'The big 3'.
The severity of angina and the effects of therapeutic interventions in patients with coronary artery disease have been assessed by determining changes in both exercise performance and the triple product (TP) of heart rate, systolic pressure, and ejection time occurring at angina. However, the validity of conclusions based on such changes is uncertain since the effects of different exercise protocols on these variables have not been determined. Twelve patients with angina were studied during upright bicycle exercise; repeated bouts of exercise using a standard protocol of 20-w increments every three minutes produced no consistent changes in TP at angina. When exercise began 20 to 60 w above the work load of the standard protocol that produced angina, exercise capacity was reduced (average 1'40'' vs. 4'40'', P < 0.001), and triple product at angina exceeded control anginal values (average 4,840 vs. 4,150, P < 0.001). In the control studies nitroglycerin (TNG) and carotid sinus nerve stimulation (CSNS) enabled patients to exercise to a higher level, although the triple product at angina was unaltered. However, at the higher work load TNG and CSNS exerted only minimal effects on exercise capacity, indicating that if the work load is excessive, a reduction in myocardial oxygen consumption produced by a therapeutic intervention may be comparatively minor so that a potentially salutary effect would be masked. We conclude that work loads causing angina in less than three minutes cannot reliably be used for studying the effects of therapy. However, if progressive work loads are chosen which cause angina in the control studies in three to six minutes, exercise capacity and triple product at angina provide important information about the efficacy and mechanism of action of a therapeutic intervention.
No one said it was going to be easy.........There is no doubt however, it could have been a lot easier , had it not been for the likes of Clegg, Blair and Heseltine trying to interfere and prevent the process of our leaving.......They have repeatedly tried , to put one obstacle after another in the way of Britain's departure, in a blatant attempt to stop the process......Clegg and his pals,would not recognise real democracy if they fell over it in the street..........

The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.

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