The Bloom Method is a unique system that is based on solid evidence compiled by our founder through her years of working individually with thousands of women in pregnancy, early post birth and well into motherhood. The Bloom Method combines cutting edge-core techniques, breathing practices, functional [mom] movements, strength training, Lagree [pilates] based moves, HiiT [for postnatal moms] and groundbreaking philosophies into one life-changing exercise method. 
Many exercise videos will make unrealistic guarantees in terms of the results you can expect to see. Beware of these because they can set you up for a real disappointment. A good example of this is a program that claims you can get “ripped” in 30 days. Well, this might be true IF you are only toning up and don’t have weight to lose. For anyone who has got pounds to lose, they finish the 30 days and are still not “ripped” because those claims did not apply to anyone who has weight to lose.
How would you like to get more out of your workouts? If your main goal is to burn fat, many traditional exercises and training styles may not be the best route for you. Typically when I'm at the gym and I look around I see a bunch of people doing exercises that don't really match up with their goals. If you're trying to get some bigger biceps you shouldn't be on the eliptical doing hours of cardio and conversely if you're trying to lose some weight and burn some belly fat you shouldn't be smashing out set after set of bicep curls. Exercises and training styles are like tools and before you just assume that watching one or two rocky movies is all the knowledge you need on exercising let's make sure that you've chosen the right tool for the job or I should for your goal. If your goal is to lose belly fat I hate to break it to you, but there is no exercise that can directly target the fat on your belly, but there are plenty of exercise methods that can indirectly burn the fat from your belly, and in this video I'll be going over ten of these methods....These training methods will help you burn more fat during & after your workout. Let's start with the very first one & that's peripheral heart action training. This is my favorite way to do all my weight training workouts, and I highly suggest that if you're trying to lose some belly fat you incorporate this style of training right away. In general your workouts for the week should be a mixture of some more aerobic & some more anaerobic workouts, meaning some of them will be geared more towards lifting heavy weights & others should be geared towards improving your cardiovascular function. But what you'll notice is that during your heavy weight training days, you wind up taking longer breaks & not breathing quite as heavy. Sometimes after some weight training workouts besides the soreness that you might feel in your muscles you may not feel like you worked out at all. So that's where peripheral heart action training comes into play. It helps incorporate an element of cardio into your weight training workout without you having to sacrifice the amount of weight your lifting. So you won't get weaker, but you'll be able to burn much more calories & accomplish much more in a shorter period of time. The best way to do this is by combining an upper body & a lower body movement into one set. For example you can combine a bench press with a squat. So you would do six to eight reps on the bench press & then right away with no break you would do squats for six to eight reps. You would perform both of these exercises with a heavy weight load & you would only take a break after completing both of them. With peripheral heart action training what you're doing is taking the blood that your heart would normally just have to pump to your chest & arms if you were just doing bench press by itself & what your doing is your forcing your body to pull & pump all that blood back down to your legs right after your set of bench without any break or recovery. This makes your heart work much harder allowing you to get your heart rate & breathing rate higher & this will burn more calories & fat in the process. Now let's say that you don't want to work legs & upper body in the same day you want to focus on each on separate days. Well the good news is that peripheral heart action training doesn't only work only if you combine an upper & a lower body movement. It'll also work if you combine two movements that work opposing muscle groups. For example if you combine chest & back movements together with no break. Or if you do quad & hamstring movements together with no break your heart will still have to work much harder to push the blood from the anterior part of your body to the posterior part of your body. So peripheral heart action training try it out. The second exercise style that can help you burn a lot more belly fat is known as cardio acceleration training. We actually have a whole hour long class at our gyms dedicated to this type of training because it's so effective. Once again it involves super setting two exercises. Except this time instead of doing two weight training exercises back to back we're combining a weight training exercise with a cardio exercise with no break. So an example of this would be to perform a set of barbell squats with heavy weight for let's say six to ten reps & then immediately with no break once you rack the bar you go right into high knees for thirty to forty five seconds. Then take a break & repeat for three to four sets
'Time exposed' to training, in both the intervention and control arms of the study, was defined as the length of time an individual spent in training with his or her original training group free of AKP. Patients were thus censored at the point they were removed from training (various time-points through the 14-week training period). Participants who successfully completed training with their original troop were censored at the point of exit (14 weeks). There was no follow-up after the 14-week point.
One way repeated ANOVA was used to compare pre-exercise neuromuscular parameters between sessions (S1, S2 and S3). As no pre-exercise (pre) neuromuscular parameters differed between sessions (except EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s), all pre-exercise parameters (except EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s) were averaged. Neuromuscular parameters were then analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA (time: pre, exhaustion, P20 and P40). Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (pre vs exhaustion, exhaustion vs P20, P20 vs P40) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction. Cohen’s effect size f(V) was also calculated.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.4 article “Mechanisms Associated With Physical ActivityBehavior: Insights From Rodent Experiments” from authors Michael D. Roberts, Gregory N. Ruegsegger, Jacob D. Brown, and Frank W. Booth. Dopaminergic signaling differences in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) seemingly predispose rats to adopt different physical activity behaviors. Physical activity behavior also may be regulated through peripheral mechanisms (i.e., muscle and fat derived as well as hormonal signals). We hypothesize that physical activity behavior is regulated by the convergence of central and peripheral mechanisms onto the NAcc.

The plank is a yoga position that is basically a push up at the top of the action; you're suspending your body in a straight line from your toes while holding your body at an incline with your arms pressing straight up from the ground. Better yet, you're squeezing your abdominal muscles while you're holding the position. This works the transverse abdominis, the deepest-lying of the abdominal muscles. Though not visible, strengthening it will enhance your core stability and posture, both of which add to the effect of an upright profile.


Athletic trainers and physical therapists play important roles in the management of individuals with RCIS. When caring for this patient population, an athletic trainer or physical therapist performs a comprehensive initial examination. Information obtained from the examination is used, in part, to (1) identify impairments believed to be contributing to the individual's pain and functional limitations and (2) develop an impairment-based rehabilitation program. We believe that the prescription of specific evidence-based interventions designed to address the relevant contributory factors might be more appropriate than administering the same exercise program to everyone with RCIS. Ideally, individuals with RCIS would be classified into impairment-based subgroups and prescribed interventions specific to that subgroup. Although no treatment classification for patients with RCIS exists, this approach has been used to treat individuals with low back pain and has resulted in superior outcomes when compared with a general treatment approach.2
From the data mentioned previously, it can be concluded that in NFO and OTS, the neuroendocrine disorder is a hypothalamic dysfunction rather than a malfunction of the peripheral hormonal organs29 and that the distinction between NFO and OTS can be characterised by hypersensitivity versus insensitivity of glucocorticoid receptors. The interactive features of the periphery and the brain could be translated into possible immunological, psychological and endocrinological disturbances.
Given that "Superslow" is long out-of-print and much more research and refinement has occurred since the early 1990's I am hesitant to recommend it to anyone other than hardcore collectors of bodybuilding or exercise related ephemera. Ken Hutchins recently updated the entire Superslow manual and further elaborated on many more topics by publishing "The Renaissance of Exercise: A Vitruvian Adventure Volume I" (2011) which is only available via mail-order and not in retail stores. It doesn't even have an ISBN number inside. But "The Renaissance of Exercise" will give you the majority of chapters from the original SuperSlow technical manual in a much more durable hardcover textbook format. It is 320 pages of no-holds-barred Ken Hutchins simply telling the truth about what he has learned after 35 years spent rigorously studying exercise. Considering current prices of some used copies of "Superslow" for sale here on Amazon you might as well spend the $150 with the folks at RenEx and you'll get _WAY_ more for your money. You can also read some of those chapters/articles for free on the RenEx website or at Hutchins' website called SuperSlow Research Zone.
In the realm of fitness, three-month workout programs dominate the landscape. You’ve even seen plenty of them in our magazine over the years. Are they effective? Absolutely. But we’re going to let you in on an interesting secret: It doesn’t necessarily take 8 or 12 weeks to get your feet wet in the gym. Not that you’ll be a seasoned vet after four weeks, but if you can just get that first month under your belt, you’ll get yourself over the proverbial hump, where so many fail and give up, and set the stage for a lifetime of muscle gains.
Hormonal responses to the two exercise bouts are presented in fig 4A–D. Visual inspection led to the conclusion that there are no differences in relative cortisol response between the NFO and the OTS group. ACTH, PRL and GH responses are higher in the NFO group compared with the OTS group, especially in the second exercise bout. However, the SE of GH in the NFO group was probably too large to draw clear conclusions. Indeed, the main effect of group gave an F ratio of F1,7=1.4 for GH. For ACTH and PRL, F ratios were F1,7=5.1 and F1,6=14.7, both significant at p<0.05, confirming larger responses for the NFO group. Visual inspection led to the conclusion that this larger response was much more pronounced after the second exercise bout. Indeed, parametric results pointed in the direction of an interaction effect between test and group for ACTH and PRL (F1,7=4.1; p=0.084; F1,6=4.0; p=0.092).
That chronic office slump is a sign that your abs are snoozing; just look at your belly. "Posture is underrated and underutilized when it comes to working our abs," Richey says. His trick: Draw your belly button in as you lift your pelvic floor, as if you were doing a Kegel, to coax your core muscles to start firing together. "Soon, you won't have to consciously think about it," he says. You can do this belly button–pelvic floor "link" several times throughout the day (holding for up to 30 seconds each time) as you're sitting at your desk, in the car, or waiting in line somewhere. (Take the next step in straightening up by tackling this posture workout.)
The aim of this study was to assess the effects of vigorous exercise on functional abilities by means of a Senior Fitness Test (SFT) in a group of elderly adults. Twenty healthy and inactive people performed vigorous exercise (VE: 12 men and 8 women, aged 69.6 ± 3.9 years). At the beginning of the study (T0) and after 3 months (T1), each subject's functional ability was tested for muscular strength, agility, cardiovascular fitness, flexibility, and balance. The VE was designed with continuous and interval exercise involving large muscle activities. Functional exercises were performed between 60% and 84% of heart rate reserve (HRR) for a duration of 65 minutes. Five out of the 6 SFTs performed were found significantly improved: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4, T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6, T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7, T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm, T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm, T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Our results suggest that a high intensity protocol and functional exercises can improve functional mobility and muscle endurance in those over 65 years of age. SFTs are an effective method for assessing improvements in the functional capacity of elderly adults.
×