This research has revealed a forgotten chapter in recent history of physical rehabilitation, medicine, and sports. Independent MMB methods have enjoyed celebrated success since 1890 and the exercises have changed the lives of millions of individuals, from common citizens to athletic performers, celebrities and Royalty. The MMB methods have provided immense personal hope and also national pride, however, to date, they have not been communally recognized as an official clinical tool or as an independent sporting category. As the scope of this paper was limited to readily available published documents, resorting at times to third-source century-old information, it is hoped that the publication will instigate further investigations to the origins of MMB methods and the general history of movement-harmonizing exercises. As the six MMB pioneers were presented in this paper as part of a broad historic movement, it is expected that future research will expose multiple other like-minded exercise methods that were developed during the same era and in similar circumstances. This will provide current MMB educators and practitioners with a wealth of information and new angles of approach that remain applicable today. To support the official healthcare identification of MMB methods as an independent activity category besides aerobic training and weightlifting, high quality research through both prospective randomized and blinded investigations along with subsequent systematic reviews and meta-analysis will eventually be required. Standardized baseline measures and criteria will be needed with external standards including functional status outcomes and appropriate statistical analysis. As an independent category, the communal value of MMB methods can be validated scientifically and accepted as evidence-based healthcare.
Jump up ^ Rhodes, J. S; Van Praag, H; Jeffrey, S; Girard, I; Mitchell, G. S; Garland Jr, T; Gage, F. H (2003). "Exercise increases hippocampal neurogenesis to high levels but does not improve spatial learning in mice bred for increased voluntary wheel running". Behavioral Neuroscience. 117 (5): 1006–16. doi:10.1037/0735-7044.117.5.1006. PMID 14570550.
^ Jump up to: a b c Cox EP, O'Dwyer N, Cook R, Vetter M, Cheng HL, Rooney K, O'Connor H (August 2016). "Relationship between physical activity and cognitive function in apparently healthy young to middle-aged adults: A systematic review". J. Sci. Med. Sport. 19 (8): 616–628. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2015.09.003. PMID 26552574. A range of validated platforms assessed CF across three domains: executive function (12 studies), memory (four studies) and processing speed (seven studies). ... In studies of executive function, five found a significant ES in favour of higher PA, ranging from small to large. Although three of four studies in the memory domain reported a significant benefit of higher PA, there was only one significant ES, which favoured low PA. Only one study examining processing speed had a significant ES, favouring higher PA.

Jumping is the purest form of explosiveness. In this move, the athlete starts from the ground and jumps onto a box of a certain height – start with a lower height box and build your way up. HOW TO DO IT: Start with your feet shoulder-width apart, and drop down to a quarter squat. Then, drive your arms up as they explode out of the quarter squat and onto the box. Once your feet land on the top of the box, you open your hips and stand up. To repeat, you can “plyo” the jump by rebounding immediately off of the ground. An alternate way of completing repeated box jumps is to step down off of the box before jumping back up. MUSCLES USED: Glutes, quads, hamstrings and calves.
Drop Sets. Drop sets can be performed with any exercise that involves moving weight around, like squats or the bench press. You have performed ten bench presses and couldn't possibly do eleven. Re-rack the weight and have a partner take off ten pounds or so, then perform as many reps as possible at that new weight. It's even easier to use dumbbells and simply move to smaller and smaller bells, set to set. Three total drop sets is the norm, do this to infinity and beyond and you may be way too sore the next day.
(2) Active Phase (between 60% and 84% HRR). Continuous dynamic and interval training mode exercise involving large muscle activities with an increasing level of difficulty and intensity. Subjects began with a short walk, alternated with various step exercises (e.g., both side and forward-backward step up and down on the platform, with alternate footsteps). Then, they went on performing alternate upper-limb lifts (while keeping inferior limbs flexed) and lower limb flexions and extensions (knee lifts, both side and forward-backward leg lifts, and leg curls), as a sort of brief and easy sequence to be repeated for a fixed time. Integrated multiple plane exercises for upper and lower limbs using elastic resistances (Xertube®) completed the last part of the Active Phase. To reach the goal of gradually augmenting the intensity of the program, the coach continuously checked the HRR level of subjects who were progressively increasing the duration and the number of exercises. The resistance of the elastic bands was also increased by one level (from very light to medium) every 4 weeks.
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