Making older adults exercise and keeping them in exercise programs is a major challenge. Understanding how older adults prefer to exercise may help developing tailored exercise programs and increase sustained exercise participation in ageing populations. We aimed to describe exercise patterns, including frequency, intensity, type, location and social setting of exercise, in older adults instructed to follow continuous moderate-intensity training (MCT) or high-intensity interval training (HIIT) over a one-year period.
In recent years, the simple exercise DVD has morphed into a complete “home fitness system,” offering multiple discs with up to a dozen workouts that are combined in very prescriptive ways. They come complete with diets, making them more like plans than just exercise routines. And they cost a lot more than the $10 or $12 you’d spend on a workout DVD. It has been almost a decade since P90X, the leader of the trend, came on the market. The craze shows no sign of slowing down, so we decided to find out whether four leading DVD systems were worth it.

Leslie of Fightmaster Yoga teaches hatha yoga for beginners, yoga for energy, yoga for reducing stress, meditation yoga, yoga workouts for strength, yoga for office workers... in other words, she offers a BIG selection of yoga classes! She is a knowledgeable instructor and is an excellent communicator, which makes her classes especially easy for beginners to follow.

If you’ve ever skipped a workout because you’re just too sore from a previous one (hey, these videos are tough!), you’re definitely not alone. That’s why we love this easy-to-follow routine. It features exercises that stretch and strengthen your muscles simultaneously so you give your body the chance to recover—without skipping a workout altogether. That’s what we consider a win-win.

Major findings: Within a few decades of the turn of the 20th century, a cluster of mind–body exercise methods emerged from at least six pioneering founders: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris. Each was based upon a similar exercise philosophy and similar functional movement-harmonizing exercises. This renaissance of independent mind–body schools occurred in parallel with the demise of the 18th and 19th century gymnasium Physical Culture movement and the concurrent emergence of bodybuilding and strength training. Even though mostly forgotten today, Western mind–body exercise methods enjoyed celebrated success during the first half of the 20th century, were hailed by medical and allied health practitioners and practiced by millions from society’s elite to deprived minorities.
Pilates, yoga and barre all provide an effective workout from which you will see positive physical results. All will help to sculpt and tone your muscles and improve your overall health. Maybe you want to increase your flexibility or cardiovascular endurance, or perhaps you want to tone your muscles without bulking up or you’re favoring a past or present injury. Maybe you want to improve your core strength and posture. An awareness of your present fitness levels and future goals can help you decide which workout method will benefit you the most.
Our findings show that older adults are able to perform both MCT and HIIT without strict supervision. Furthermore, older adults randomized to MCT versus HIIT have different patterns of exercise type and location of exercise, while there are no differences in social setting of exercise. The observed sex differences were the same in both training groups. Clinicians and researchers might capitalize on our findings when planning future exercise interventions targeting older adults. Our findings may also provide important information for future public health initiatives in order to provide tailored exercise recommendations.
Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.
Now that you understand the vast amount of categories available to you, you can start narrowing the field of choices down by looking at the specifics of exercise videos and deciding which ones will be something you will not only enjoy but continue to use long term. If you are starting out as a beginner to exercise, then you should expect to upgrade your exercise videos as your fitness levels increase. You don’t have to stay with a beginner video when your fitness level advances to intermediate or advanced. Below are some factors to look at when looking at individual videos.
Description. The patient put one hand over the same shoulder with the palm touching the back and reached down the back. He/she placed the other hand up the back from the waist with the palm facing outwards. Pointing the middle fingers of each hand towards each other, patient tried to touch the fingers of each hand in the middle of the back. The number of inches (centimeters) between the extended middle fingers was measured. The test was always done with the right hand over the shoulder and the left behind the back.
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