Did you know that there are actually four types of exercise, all of which serve varied purposes? Everyone knows that routine exercise is very important for healthy adults for varied functions, including bone and muscle strength, weight-loss or weight maintenance, heart health and even cognitive health. But there are four different types of exercise: Aerobic (or endurance), strength, flexibility and balance.

Personal trainer James Shapiro has a tough yet effective way to get your triceps toned and defined with “body weight skull crushers.” He says to “start in a pushup position either on the floor or on an incline. Have your hands inside shoulder width and fingers point straight ahead of you. Focusing on only bending from your elbows—which should remain tucked into your sides and not flared out—go down feeling the stretch and focus on your triceps.”
Your body clock, that is. Try to work out at the time you have the most energy, suggests Jason Theodosakis, MD, exercise physiologist at the University of Arizona College of Medicine. If you're a morning person, schedule your fitness activities early in the day; if you perk up as the day goes along, plan your activities in the afternoon or evening.
This gymnastics move is for the advanced CrossFitter. Hailing from gymnastics, the ring muscle-up is one of the hardest moves a CrossFitter can complete. HOW TO DO IT: Start with either a false grip or regular grip. For the false grip, hook your wrists into the ring. This position, while uncomfortable, shortens the lever of the arm, creating less distance for you to travel. Most CrossFitters kip this move because of its degree of difficulty, but it can be done strict as well. Swing your body back to gain momentum and thrust your hips into the air while pulling with all your upper body strength (similar to a pull-up) so that the body raises to ring height or above. Always keep the rings as close to your body as possible to have the most control and strength on the rings. Once you are at ring height, quickly push your head and chest through the rings into a dip position. Then push up out of the dip position with a kip from the legs or from strict strength. MUSCLES USED: Back, shoulders, core and triceps.
Flexibility is a factor in yoga, but it is not a necessary for beginner classes. Continued practice over time will increase your agility and flexibility. You can see positive results over time even if you only attend an hour a week, but attending classes around 2-3 times per week will help you experience the most benefits. Yoga classes usually last around an hour from warm-up to cool down.
The Canadian Society for Exercise Physiology has published "The Canadian Physical Activity, Fitness & Lifestyle Approach", which details fitness assessment protocols. One such protocol, the mCAFT, is designed to give information about the aerobic fitness of a person, while using minimal equipment. The subject works by lifting its own body weight up and down double steps (40.6 cm in height total) while listening to set cadences from a compact disc. The end-stage of the age and gender specific stepping rate requires 85% of the age-predicted maximum heart rate. The heart rate increases approximately in a linear fashion from 50% to 100% of maximal oxygen intake. The heart rate does not decrease significantly during the first fifteen seconds of recovery. Thus, one can predict an aerobic fitness using the heart rate right after exercise of a known sub-maximal rate of working.
(2) Active Phase (between 60% and 84% HRR). Continuous dynamic and interval training mode exercise involving large muscle activities with an increasing level of difficulty and intensity. Subjects began with a short walk, alternated with various step exercises (e.g., both side and forward-backward step up and down on the platform, with alternate footsteps). Then, they went on performing alternate upper-limb lifts (while keeping inferior limbs flexed) and lower limb flexions and extensions (knee lifts, both side and forward-backward leg lifts, and leg curls), as a sort of brief and easy sequence to be repeated for a fixed time. Integrated multiple plane exercises for upper and lower limbs using elastic resistances (Xertube®) completed the last part of the Active Phase. To reach the goal of gradually augmenting the intensity of the program, the coach continuously checked the HRR level of subjects who were progressively increasing the duration and the number of exercises. The resistance of the elastic bands was also increased by one level (from very light to medium) every 4 weeks.
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