Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This… CONTINUE READING

Publications, establishment recognition, and public support followed the success. In 1932, Fairbairn was elected President of the Royal College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists.31 Fairbairn JS. Obituary. BJOG: An International Journal of Obstetrics and Gynaecology. 1944;51:152–6.10.1111/bjo.1944.51.issue-2[Crossref] [Google Scholar] In 1936, Morris (in collaboration with Randell) published ‘Maternity and Post-Operative Exercises,’ that illustrated exercises for pregnant and puerperal women and those who had been operated on. The book emphasized breathing, relaxation, conscious training of the pelvic floor muscles, and re-establishing good posture.32 Morris M. Maternity and post-operative exercises. London: Heinemann; 1936. [Google Scholar] A year later, Morris published ‘Basic Physical Training’ for the general public, dedicated to ‘all those who, realising the inter-dependence of mental and physical well-being, are working to raise the standard of health.’33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] In 1939, Randell published her seminal textbook ‘Training for Childbirth - From the Mothers Point of View’ which described her philosophy in detail with related anatomy and pathology and exercise descriptions and instructions.25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] This was followed up in 1949 with ‘Fearless Childbirth’, a practical manual for mothers-to-be.34 Randell M. Fearless childhood. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1953. [Google Scholar]

The bench press or dumbbell bench-press is performed while lying face up on a bench, by pushing a weight away from the chest. This is a compound exercise that also involves the triceps and the front deltoids, also recruits the upper and lower back muscles, and traps. The bench press is the king of all upper body exercises and is one of the most popular chest exercises in the world. It is the final exercise in 'The big 3'.
Exercising looks different in every country, as do the motivations behind exercising.[2] In some countries, people exercise primarily indoors, and in others, people primarily exercise outdoors. People may exercise for personal enjoyment, health and well-being, social interactions, competition or training, etc. These differences could potentially be attributed to geographic location, social tendencies, or otherwise.
There are two other studies that have measured prolactin in relation to overtraining. Lehmann et al23 showed that an increase in training volume, rather than intensity, led to more symptoms associated with overtraining. They also observed a close-to-significant exercise-induced decrease in plasma prolactin in the increased intensity group but no change because of increased volume. Budgett et al24 observed a more marked plasma prolactin response to a neuroendocrine challenge in athletes with unexplained underperformance syndrome. They also observed a higher resting plasma prolactin in unexplained underperformance syndrome athletes than healthy controls. These authors also state that prolactin could prove useful in monitoring the individual response to training and recovery.

Physical activity is beneficial for young people, who are naturally primed to soak up its rewards. The reality is that the majority of today’s youths, however, fall into one of two camps: Either they are athletes, engaging in one or many sports (as well as auxiliary training such as weightlifting and agility work, which can help create lifelong fitness habits) or they are sedentary.
The purpose of this paper is to investigate the history, origins, and influences of Western MMB training, to raise healthcare stakeholders’ awareness of this type of training and to initiate the consideration of official acceptance of MMB methods as an independent exercise category alongside aerobic training and weightlifting. This would provide decision-makers and individuals with new tools to prescribe optimal exercise combinations for remedial purposes, prevention of pathologies, and obesity as well as general health and performance enhancement. Significantly, these are the major factors that facilitate a regular active lifestyle.
Also important to know is how to determine how much weight you should use. Start with a light weight and perform a set. Continue adding weight until you can do the desired number of reps with good form, which includes moving slowly enough that you're using muscle—and not momentum—to lift the weight. The last rep should be difficult, but not impossible, and you should be able to keep good form while doing it.

Although there is research concluding the effectiveness of the Alfredson protocol, some individuals find the completion of 180 repetitions of exercise daily to be difficult to achieve.  A study in the February 2014 issue of the Journal of Orthopaedic and Sports Physical Therapy indicated that a modified version of the Alfredson protocol with a "do as much as tolerated" approach achieved similar positive results as the full 180 repetition protocol.

SOURCES: American College of Sports Medicine web site. Michael R. Bracko, EdD, FACSM, chairman, American College of Sports Medicine's Consumer Information Committee. Rita Redberg, MSc, chairwoman, American Heart Association's Scientific Advisory Board for the Choose to Move program. Cedric Bryant, PhD, chief exercise physiologist, American Council on Exercise. Stephanie Siegrist, MD, orthopedic surgeon, Rochester, N.Y. Sal Fichera, exercise physiologist; owner, Forza Fitness, New York.


Recruitment criteria were one or both of sedentariness and dysmetabolism. Thus, we selected subjects who were not physically active or involved in any exercise program; that is, they had a sedentary lifestyle. Moreover, before entering the study, they were carefully screened for metabolic problems which attested a dysmetabolic status, as increased levels of plasma glucose, free fatty acids, triglyceride, and urate in fasting state. Both criteria were verified by means of family doctor databases of subjects.
×