The OLDE protocol and neuromuscular function tests were performed on a Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer (CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). The axis of the dynamometer was aligned with the knee axis, and the lever arm was attached to the shank with a strap. Two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Full description of the OLDE protocol can be found in Pageaux et al. [8]. Briefly, this protocol allows isolating the knee extensor muscles during a dynamic exercise involving an active isotonic knee extension (from 10 deg to 90 deg, 0 deg = knee fully extended) and a passive knee flexion. The passive flexion angular velocity was set up at 300 deg/s automatically cushioned by the dynamometer for safety purposes. Due to this cushion, the passive knee flexion angular velocity was ~ 180 deg/s. According to a previous study [8], a cadence of 50 contractions per minute (cpm) was chosen (knee extension angular velocity ~ 106°/s). Subjects maintained a cadence of 50 cpm at all visits via the use of a metronome. Power output produced by the subject was controlled according to the formula:


The severity of angina and the effects of therapeutic interventions in patients with coronary artery disease have been assessed by determining changes in both exercise performance and the triple product (TP) of heart rate, systolic pressure, and ejection time occurring at angina. However, the validity of conclusions based on such changes is uncertain since the effects of different exercise protocols on these variables have not been determined. Twelve patients with angina were studied during upright bicycle exercise; repeated bouts of exercise using a standard protocol of 20-w increments every three minutes produced no consistent changes in TP at angina. When exercise began 20 to 60 w above the work load of the standard protocol that produced angina, exercise capacity was reduced (average 1'40'' vs. 4'40'', P < 0.001), and triple product at angina exceeded control anginal values (average 4,840 vs. 4,150, P < 0.001). In the control studies nitroglycerin (TNG) and carotid sinus nerve stimulation (CSNS) enabled patients to exercise to a higher level, although the triple product at angina was unaltered. However, at the higher work load TNG and CSNS exerted only minimal effects on exercise capacity, indicating that if the work load is excessive, a reduction in myocardial oxygen consumption produced by a therapeutic intervention may be comparatively minor so that a potentially salutary effect would be masked. We conclude that work loads causing angina in less than three minutes cannot reliably be used for studying the effects of therapy. However, if progressive work loads are chosen which cause angina in the control studies in three to six minutes, exercise capacity and triple product at angina provide important information about the efficacy and mechanism of action of a therapeutic intervention.
Whether you’re a beginning exerciser who needs help getting started or someone who wants to add some spice to your fitness routine, our ACE Exercise Library offers a variety of movements to choose from. Browse through total-body exercises or movements that target more specific areas of the body. Each comes with a detailed description and photos to help ensure proper form.

I have used the standard protocol (10 seconds plus or minus two for both concentric and eccentric contractions) of this method, although sometimes I prefer going a bit faster such as 4/4, 6/6 or 8/8 seconds respectively. It is not easy and even a bit painful to do a single set of each exercise and "inroad" the muscles. Moving from machine to machine between exercises with no rest, one experiences tremendous cardio-respiratory workload (experiences counterpulsation due to very large venous return to the heart) and some feel extreme fatigue when finished. A workout can last as little as 10-12 minutes, based on 5 basic compound exercises (ie: ankle raise, trunk extension, squat, shoulder or chest press, pulldowns), and personally, I found I needed 2 workouts/week in order to achieve the strength gains I desired. Some think only one session per week is needed and I believe this is a personal and time management choice.
In both groups, men had a significantly higher proportion of sessions at a gym compared to women (Fig. 6). Contrary, women had a higher proportion of sessions at a sports facility compared to men. In the MCT group, men had a significantly higher proportion of sessions outdoors compared to women, while the opposite was observed in the HIIT group (Fig. 6).

We spent 41 hours on research, videography, and editing, to review the top selections for this wiki. If you're looking to get in the best shape of your life without putting up with crowded gyms, expensive memberships, or accidentally lying in pools of other people's sweat, then these exercise DVDs will take your fitness game to the next level. The workouts are not easy, but when you see that six-pack staring back at you in the mirror, you'll definitely know they're worth it. When users buy our independently chosen editorial picks, we may earn commissions to support our work. Skip to the best workout dvd on Amazon.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 46.3 article “The Microvasculature and Skeletal Muscle Healthin Aging” from authors Rian Q. Landers-Ramos and Steven J. Prior. Aging and aging-related declines in physical activity are associated with physical and metabolic impairments. Skeletal muscle capillarization is reduced in sedentary older adults, may contribute to impairments in skeletal muscle, and is modifiable by exercise training. This article examines the hypothesis that preservation of skeletal muscle capillarization is essential to maintain metabolism, fitness, and function with aging.

Individual and group time to exhaustion duration are presented Table 2. Time to exhaustion duration ranged from 3.94 to 9.44 min (S1: 6.07 ± 1.71 min, S2: 5.59 ± 0.99 min, S3: 6.23 ± 1.68 min) and did not differ between sessions (P = 0.156). Individual and group CV are presented in Table 2. The ICC was 0.795 (0.493, 0.950). The typical error of measurement was 0.30 min and the smallest worthwhile change was 0.28 min. Bland-Altman plots for raw and log transformed data are presented in Fig 3. LOA was equal to 15.59.
Katy Fraggos, co-Owner and Head Trainer at Perspirology, says you can work your triceps, core, hip flexor, working leg quadriceps, and supporting leg hamstring in just 30 seconds a day with this move. “Start with your hands behind your back on the floor with fingertips pointed in. Working leg lifted with flexed foot. Butt is off the floor,” she says. “When elbows are bent, the knee is pulled into the chest. Arms will straighten as leg kicks outward to the front of the body in a ‘pumping’ action.” Try to complete as many as possible in 30 seconds and then if you have extra time, repeat for 30 seconds with the opposite leg lifted.
Exercise was defined as planned, structured activities, for instance going for walks, skiing, swimming and doing sports, but also as unplanned activities that the participants experienced as exercise. The participants were asked to fill in exercise logs immediately after each exercise session they performed throughout the year and send them to the research center either in prepaid envelopes monthly, or to use internet-based forms following each exercise session [21]. Exercise frequency was calculated as the mean number of sessions reported per week during the year. To assess intensity of exercise the participants reported their subjective RPE on a Borg scale ranging from 6 to 20 [20]. The participants were asked to report the mean intensity level during the exercise session. Ratings from 6 to 10 were classified as low intensity, 11 to 14 as moderate intensity, and 15 to 20 as high intensity. Duration of exercise was measured with a 4-point scale: less than 15 min, 15–29 min, 30 min to 1 h, and more than 1 h. Less than 15 min and 15–29 min was combined due to a low response rate on these response options (1.1 and 8.7% of the total number of exercise sessions, respectively).
Physiological, psychological and EMG responses to the time to exhaustion tests are presented Figs 4 and 5. Leg RPE (Fig 4A), leg muscle pain (Fig 4B) and heart rate (HR, Fig 4C) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Cadence during the time to exhaustion decreased over time (P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for these aforementioned parameters are presented Fig 5. EMG RMS of the VL (Fig 5A), VM (Fig 5B), RF (Fig 5C) and the sum of these muscles (Fig 5D) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for EMG parameters are presented Fig 5. Blood lactate concentration increased (from 1.3 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and blood glucose concentration decreased (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 4.4 ± 0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.001) over time.
The simplest way to workout at home is to use your own body. There are a variety of effective body weight exercises that can help you build strength, endurance and burn calories. The downside is that, without added resistance, it's tough to work hard enough to really challenge your body and burn calories. One way around that problem? Circuit training. By going from one exercise to the next, without little or no rest, you keep your heart rate up, burn more calories and get the most out of your exercise time.
All six MMB pioneers expected near magical effects from the regular non-exhausting practice of their exercise regimes. This promised a lifetime of optimal health, beauty, and strength for the body and mind. Further, expected benefits include improved quality and efficacy of daily activities, looking and feeling good, making life itself easier and more pleasurable with a disappearance or reduction of symptoms while improving postures. This leads to increased self-esteem, reduced health costs, and the expectation of a longer and high-quality life. It is interesting to note that all six MMB pioneers enjoyed long and fruitful lives that reflect this philosophical model within real life examples: Checkley died in 1925 at 78; Müller in 1938 at 72; Alexander in 1955 at 86; Randell in 1974 at 99; Pilates in 1967 at 87; and Morris in 1980 at 89.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 44.3 article Peripheral Blood Flow Regulation in Human Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome from author Jacqueline K. Limberg. Both obesity and metabolic syndrome are important cardiovascular disease risk factors. In this review, we explore the hypothesis that young obese adults and adults with metabolic syndrome exhibit alterations in blood flow regulation that occur before the onset of overt cardiovascular dysfunction.
A pair of small hand-weights adds punch to a Pilates workout at home. For this move, imagine you are twirling the weights like sparklers on the Fourth of July. Stand with the weights held at your thighs. Turn them slightly in to face each other and make eight small circles. Each circle should be a little higher until the hands are overhead. Make eight circles in the opposite direction as you lower the arms. Repeat 2-3 times.
I created The Bloom Method with a desire to empower women before, during and after pregnancy. As a Pre & Postnatal Exercise Specialist, Core Rehabilitation Specialist and Pre and Postnatal Holistic Health Coach, I strive to provide women with empowering tools to help support your pregnancy, empower you during birth, prevent common pregnancy-related issues such as Diastasis Recti, Pelvic Floor Incontinence, and Prolapse. My clients that have experienced my methods experience a quicker healing phase post-baby.
One way repeated ANOVA was used to compare pre-exercise neuromuscular parameters between sessions (S1, S2 and S3). As no pre-exercise (pre) neuromuscular parameters differed between sessions (except EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s), all pre-exercise parameters (except EMG RMS RF at 60 deg/s) were averaged. Neuromuscular parameters were then analyzed with one-way repeated measures ANOVA (time: pre, exhaustion, P20 and P40). Significant effect of time was explored with planned comparison (pre vs exhaustion, exhaustion vs P20, P20 vs P40) adjusted with Holm-Bonferonni correction. Cohen’s effect size f(V) was also calculated.
I've been strength training for over 15 years now. In college, between martial arts and four months of lifting weights for 6 hours per week I gave myself overuse injuries in my shoulders and knee. I've tried everything, including Mike Mentzer's books, Arnold Schwarzennegger's Bodybuilding Bible, Stuart McRobert's Beyond Brawn, Sisco and Little's Power Factor Training, routines from Men's Health, Flex, and Muscle & Fitness magazines - you name it. Super Slow (and its cousins Slow Burn and Power of 10) are the ONLY form of exercise I can handle for more than two months without having those pains flare up with a vengeance and force me to quit. I've done Super Slow for years without the slightest ache except for normal muscle soreness.
Take the stairs. You know, some people pay to use stairs (read: they buy a stair stepper machine), so if you work or live above the first floor, consider using your stairs as a privilege. Using the stairs is great cardiovascular exercise, and also tones your calves, hamstrings, glutes, quadriceps, and abs. Next time you're about to take the elevator or escalator, take the stairs instead. If you have some time to spare, take an extra trip up and down. Or, try a stair-based workout like this one.

Physiological, psychological and EMG responses to the time to exhaustion tests are presented Figs 4 and 5. Leg RPE (Fig 4A), leg muscle pain (Fig 4B) and heart rate (HR, Fig 4C) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Cadence during the time to exhaustion decreased over time (P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for these aforementioned parameters are presented Fig 5. EMG RMS of the VL (Fig 5A), VM (Fig 5B), RF (Fig 5C) and the sum of these muscles (Fig 5D) increased over time (all P < 0.001). Planned comparisons for EMG parameters are presented Fig 5. Blood lactate concentration increased (from 1.3 ± 0.5 to 6.0 ± 1.1 mmol/L, P < 0.001) and blood glucose concentration decreased (from 5.3 ± 0.5 to 4.4 ± 0.3 mmol/L, P = 0.001) over time.


If you ask most busy people why they don’t exercise, by far the most common reason is that that they “don’t have time.” The effort of putting on workout clothes, going to the gym and showering is simply too onerous to fit in. Even the idea of a boring home workout or a 30-minute exercise tape can feel like too much of a commitment when we’re late for work or for a date.

The OLDE protocol and neuromuscular function tests were performed on a Cybex NORM isokinetic dynamometer (CMSi, Computer Sports Medicine Inc., Stoughton, USA). The axis of the dynamometer was aligned with the knee axis, and the lever arm was attached to the shank with a strap. Two shoulder harnesses and a belt across the abdomen limited extraneous movement of the upper body. Full description of the OLDE protocol can be found in Pageaux et al. [8]. Briefly, this protocol allows isolating the knee extensor muscles during a dynamic exercise involving an active isotonic knee extension (from 10 deg to 90 deg, 0 deg = knee fully extended) and a passive knee flexion. The passive flexion angular velocity was set up at 300 deg/s automatically cushioned by the dynamometer for safety purposes. Due to this cushion, the passive knee flexion angular velocity was ~ 180 deg/s. According to a previous study [8], a cadence of 50 contractions per minute (cpm) was chosen (knee extension angular velocity ~ 106°/s). Subjects maintained a cadence of 50 cpm at all visits via the use of a metronome. Power output produced by the subject was controlled according to the formula:
To qualify for inclusion, studies had to be level 1 or level 2 (randomized controlled trials); had to compare rehabilitation interventions, such as exercise or manual therapy, with other treatments or placebo; had to include validated outcome measures of pain, function, or disability; and had to be limited to individuals with diagnosed impingement syndrome. Impingement syndrome was determined by a positive impingement sign per Neer or Hawkins criteria, or both. Articles were excluded if they addressed other shoulder conditions (eg, calcific tendinosis, full-thickness rotator cuff tears, adhesive capsulitis, osteoarthritis), addressed postoperative management, were retrospective studies or case series, or used other outcome measures.

Before anyone’s crowned Cap’n Crunch, remember form is key. Lie on your back with the knees bent and feet flat on the floor. With hands behind the head, place the chin down slightly and peel the head and shoulders off the mat while engaging the core. Continue curling up until the upper back is off the mat. Hold briefly, then lower the torso back toward the mat slowly.
When visual inspection gave an indication for group differences, parametric statistical analyses were performed through ANOVA with repeated measures with one withinsubjects factor (post-values for first and second exercise test) and one between-subjects factor (NFO or OTS) or through an independent samples t test. Those analyses were performed in SPSS V.15.0. Sensitivity was also calculated for these variables by dividing the number of correct OTS or NFO diagnoses by hormonal analysis by the total number of OTS or NFO diagnoses according to the consensus statement.1 Sensitivity was presented as a ratio. The denominator varies because of random missing values.
At the end of each pregnancy journey, you’re greeted by the mother of all marathons and we want to help you prepare for your birth experience in the best possible ways. Our Bloom classes as well as our 1:1 foundational crash courses were designed with empowerment in mind. We can’t promise you’ll find gentle workouts behind our studio door [you’ve got a marathon to train for] but we can promise that each workout will give you the safest, most effective, mind + body focused workout you’ll find in the prenatal world. Our workouts will make you sweat, challenging you both mentally and physically, while we integrate our signature techniques seamlessly into each exercise you move through. Think of it as childbirth education meets a safe sweat session gifting you tools to be used time and time again.
Vinylcise has been historically neglected, and probably for good reason: it's terrible, and not very effective—at least not since we've had visual media alternatives. Can you imagine trying to follow along to an audio-only workout? At any rate, these workout records first appeared in the early 1920s, and were usually accompanied by a paper foldout with exercise diagrams (see the image). The earliest of these records appear to be the set of five Wallace Reducing Records released in 1920-1922 by the Wallace Institute of Chicago and pressed by Columbia Records. These records were marketed towards women, aiming to help them "get thin to music." Other exercise records of the 1920s included Victor Records for Health Exercises, released in 1922, the Battle Creek Sanitarium Health Ladder, directed by John Harvey Kellogg and released by Columbia Records in 1923, and Walter Camp's Daily Dozen, released in 1924.

PiYo isn't like standard Pilates and yoga classes that make you hold long, intense poses, or lead you through dozens of repetitive, microscopic core movements. PiYo speeds everything up—including your results—by introducing you to dynamic, flowing sequences that can burn serious calories at the same time as they lengthen and tone your muscles and increase your flexibility.
Aerobic exercise induces mitochondrial biogenesis and an increased capacity for oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria of skeletal muscle, which is one mechanism by which aerobic exercise enhances submaximal endurance performance.[98] [92][99] These effects occur via an exercise-induced increase in the intracellular AMP:ATP ratio, thereby triggering the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) which subsequently phosphorylates peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), the master regulator of mitochondrial biogenesis.[92][99][100]
Doonya describes itself as “your at-home solution for fun dance-fitness!” Bring the energy and dance of Bollywood straight to your living room with this cardio workout. With loads of energy, Doonya co-founders Kajal Desai and Priya Pandya give you a taste of their high-powered dance routines with this four-minute video that’ll leave you sweating in no time. You’ll definitely need some coordination to complete this routine, but it’s great for beginners.
Data were analysed using three different methods: visual inspection, parametric statistics and calculation of sensitivity for both OTS and NFO detection. Because the sample size was rather small (ie, maximal 5 for each group), data were first inspected visually. Parametric statistics and sensitivity calculation were used to support conclusions from visual inspection of the data. For the purpose of visual inspection, we created graphs with averages and SE for both the OTS and the NFO groups.
Often, when you watch someone lifting weights in a gym, you’ll notice they’re essentially “throwing” the weights up and “dropping” the weights down more than actually “lifting” or “lowering” the weights. They’re allowing certain aspects of physics (momentum, inertia, and gravity) to do much of the work for them instead of truly engaging, and therefore stimulating their muscles. Unfortunately their “perceived” goal is to make the weight move, but the real goal in weight training isn’t just moving the weight; the goal is to fatigue and challenge the targeted muscles. Depending on the specific exercise and range of movement involved, we instruct our clients to take approximately 10 seconds to lift the weight and another 5-10 seconds to lower the weight. By moving slowly, you’re not allowing inertia to carry the weight up or using gravity to let the weight crash down during the lowering phase of the movement. This enhanced and more complete muscle fiber stimulation ensures that you’re not simply “spinning your wheels.” This high-quality exercise stimulus will lead to greater results far quicker than more traditional lifting methods.
Rock climbing is one of the most physically challenging sports, testing strength, endurance, flexibility, and stamina. Good climbers have to build and maintain each of these assets. This is revised and updated edition of the classic book, Conditioning for Climbers, provides climbers of all ages and experience with the knowledge and tools to design and follow a comprehensive, personalized exercise program.
^ Jump up to: a b Kyu, Hmwe H; Bachman, Victoria F; Alexander, Lily T; Mumford, John Everett; Afshin, Ashkan; Estep, Kara; Veerman, J Lennert; Delwiche, Kristen; Iannarone, Marissa L; Moyer, Madeline L; Cercy, Kelly; Vos, Theo; Murray, Christopher J L; Forouzanfar, Mohammad H (9 August 2016). "Physical activity and risk of breast cancer, colon cancer, diabetes, ischemic heart disease, and ischemic stroke events: systematic review and dose-response meta-analysis for the Global Burden of Disease Study 2013". BMJ. 354: i3857. doi:10.1136/bmj.i3857. PMC 4979358. PMID 27510511.
In her hilarious, naked, and explicitly honest anecdote, she described her aversion to most fitness regimens ("I can't run because I piss myself . . . and fart at the same time"), her DVD workout — "Charlotte's 3-Minute Belly Blitz" — and her complete surprise at the intensity of the routine ("THAT'S the f*cking WARMUP?"). To be honest, most of us have been there, so this is pretty damn relatable.
Contrary to popular belief, most injuries in a gym or not caused by “too much weight” (although it is certainly possible). Most gym-related injuries are caused by too much FORCE, not too much weight. Remember: F=MxA (Force = Mass x Acceleration). If you can reduce the Acceleration, you will reduce the Force that your body is exposed to. This greatly reduces the risk of injury. It isn’t necessarily the weight that causes injury, but the person’s “behavior” with the weight that determines the level of safety. With slow motion exercise, we lift and lower weight so deliberately, so slowly, our protocol is one of the safest resistance training programs available.
If you’ve ever skipped a workout because you’re just too sore from a previous one (hey, these videos are tough!), you’re definitely not alone. That’s why we love this easy-to-follow routine. It features exercises that stretch and strengthen your muscles simultaneously so you give your body the chance to recover—without skipping a workout altogether. That’s what we consider a win-win.
4) The schedule of workouts, while ideal for those in good shape, is a bit too aggressive for most. Your muscles NEED rest (and proper nutrition) to recover and become stronger. The calendar given provides only 1 day per week to rest. You may find you need more, especially early on while you are using and building new muscles. Modifiy and listen to your body accordingly.
The effects of exercise training appear to be heterogeneous across non-mammalian species. As examples, exercise training of salmon showed minor improvements of endurance,[155] and a forced swimming regimen of yellowtail amberjack and rainbow trout accelerated their growth rates and altered muscle morphology favorable for sustained swimming.[156][157] Crocodiles, alligators, and ducks showed elevated aerobic capacity following exercise training.[158][159][160] No effect of endurance training was found in most studies of lizards,[158][161] although one study did report a training effect.[162] In lizards, sprint training had no effect on maximal exercise capacity,[162] and muscular damage from over-training occurred following weeks of forced treadmill exercise.[161]
What type of exercise do you enjoy? – Do you love to dance? Do you like ballroom moves or hip hop? Do you enjoy martial arts inspired moves like kickboxing? Do you prefer walking? There are so many varieties of exercise videos available that you can find many that cater to the type of exercise you like to do. Don’t get locked into only one form though because learning something new can keep you from getting workout burnout. This is one of the reasons a popular exercise series called P90X3 is so popular. Every day you will have a new form of exercise to look forward to.
In extreme instances, over-exercising induces serious performance loss. Unaccustomed overexertion of muscles leads to rhabdomyolysis (damage to muscle) most often seen in new army recruits.[88] Another danger is overtraining, in which the intensity or volume of training exceeds the body's capacity to recover between bouts. One result of detrimental overtraining is suppressed immune function, with an increased incidence of upper respiratory tract infection (URTI). An increased incidence of URTIs is also associated with high volume/intensity training, as well as with excessive exercise (EE), such as in a marathon.[89] Marathon training requires the runner to build their intensity week to week which makes them more susceptible to injury the more they increase their mileage. A study shows that in the last 10–15 years up to 90% of marathon runners have suffered a physical injury from their training.[90]
When visual inspection gave an indication for group differences, parametric statistical analyses were performed through ANOVA with repeated measures with one withinsubjects factor (post-values for first and second exercise test) and one between-subjects factor (NFO or OTS) or through an independent samples t test. Those analyses were performed in SPSS V.15.0. Sensitivity was also calculated for these variables by dividing the number of correct OTS or NFO diagnoses by hormonal analysis by the total number of OTS or NFO diagnoses according to the consensus statement.1 Sensitivity was presented as a ratio. The denominator varies because of random missing values.

The main aim of this study was to test the reliability of a novel OLDE protocol performed at high intensity (workload fixed at 85% peak power output [22]). Isokinetic muscle fatigue and its recovery up to 40 s post exercise were also measured. Subjects visited the laboratory on four different days. During the first visit, subjects were familiarized with the OLDE protocol (see One Leg Dynamic Exercise for more details), and performed after 30 min recovery an incremental test to measure peak power output. After 30 min recovery following the incremental test, subjects were familiarized with neuromuscular testing (see Neuromuscular Function Tests for more details) and the time to exhaustion test. As suggested by Andersen et al. [10], torque and electromyographic (EMG) feedback were used to ensure a quick and reliable familiarization to the novel OLDE protocol. Each of the following three visits (reliability sessions) consisted of completion of the time to exhaustion test with neuromuscular testing pre and post-exercise. An overview of these three sessions can be seen in Fig 1.


After 5 min warm up at 20% of peak power output, subjects performed a time to exhaustion at 85% of peak power output. Exhaustion was defined as a decrease in cadence below 40 cpm for a duration ≥ 10 s or when the subject voluntarily stopped. Subjects were not aware of the time elapsed during the time to exhaustion test. Verbal encouragements were provided by an experimenter naïve of time to exhaustion during the previous sessions.
“Everyone can dance! Just embrace your style! And, if it’s for fitness, well, the point is to get you moving, not to be a professional! So, if you’re sweating and having a good time, you’re doing it right!” says Blogilates creator Cassey Ho. In this video, she takes you through a step-by-step, 14-minute dance cardio workout, complete with instructions. This video is great for those who need a bit of extra guidance. After you’ve learned the exercises, you may even be able to take a few of these moves to the floor.

A Polar (www.polar.fi) heart rate monitor (belt and watch) is used to measure heart rate continuously. A transmitter belt is fastened around the chest while the watch is held by a nearby observer. If at any time during the experiment the heart rate exceeds the predetermined ceiling (85% of age-predicted max heart rate) the experiment should be stopped immediately.

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