I bought this book many years ago and for a while believed that SuperSlow (TM) was the ultimate training protocol. Now I believe that it is just one of many effective training techniques. I also believe that if Hutchins would combine SuperSlow with undulating periodization, also refered to as nonlinear periodization by Fleck & Kraemer in their book Optimiizing Strength Training, he could get many more converts. Charles Poliquin is of the opinion that for advanced trainees using the same loading (percentage of 1RM) will have a plateau effect within six workouts. So, insead of using SuperSlow only for moderate weights, workouts can be alternated using heavier weights with fewer reps per set in one workout and moderate weights in the next workout. The use of heavy weights requires more than one set though. It seems that no matter what training speed one uses there seems to be a minimum amount of work to achieve a training effect. I tried SuperSlow with undulating periodization as an experiment and made good progress for several weeks. I still use SuperSlow for about 20% of my workout, but also have discovered that maximal static holds are very effective too. I know that there are those who advocate training fast, but even Fleck and Kraemer recommend that speed or power workouts make up less than half the training time. Besides, if speed and rate of force development are important, then free weighta really aren't the best option. Isokinetic machines (Minigym), springs, jump bands, and marine pushups, medicine balls, modified Smith machines, some bodyweight exercises, etc. are better choices. Hutchins' book might be overkill if you just want the rudiments of SuperSlow. I kept mine for a while as a historical document. It still might be an interesting purchase just to read from the master himself. The bottom line, I think, is that SuperSlow can be very effective for building strength and size. SuperSlow has its detractors and it's not the only game in town. I'd really like to see Hutchins add undulating periodization to SuperSlow. I'd also like to see some rigorous studies comparing SuperSlow to other protocols. Most studies so far have been flawed. Some people will not like SuperSlow -- especially as a steady diet, but for a lot of others I think it is worth a trial. Training can get boring. A few Superslow sets can add variety.


1) The biggest critique I have is that transitions from poses are too aggressive and, in many cases, FAR too quick. This could very easily result in stabilizer injury with those healing from core, back, spine or neck injuries or those who don't have the best core strength to begin with. The example that comes to mind is in the 'Sweat" workout. The rapid change from low lunge into a one-foot balanced runner caused an injury for me the first week, and just again today after 6 weeks. If you have ANY history of car crash with spinal involvement, low back problems, abdominal surgery, or core weakness, you MUST listen to your body carefully during these workouts. The modifications are helpful, but they simply decrease the impact of the position once you are in them. The quick transitions in PiYO keep heart rates up, but they also jeopardize the safety of joints or muscles that are a) fatigued from participating and b) unstable due to weakness. Adapt and SLOW DOWN when needed. Better to do 2 sets safely than 4 sets and getting hurt.

Although there is evidence of Pilates teaching standing exercises at Jacob’s Pillow,48 YouTube [Internet]. Difusión de Pilates. Joseph Pilates holistic video (1932). 2014 Dec 14 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=BynuIO3smSI. [Google Scholar] he excluded standing exercises from his 34 exercise Contrology home routine, in contrast to the documented repertoires of Checkley,9 Checkley E. A natural method of physical training. New York (NY): William C. Bryant & Co.; 1890. [Google Scholar] Müller,15 Müller JP. My system. London: Link House; 1904. [Google Scholar] Randell,25 Randell M. Training for childbirth from a mother's point of view. 4th ed. London: J. & A. Churchill Ltd.; 1949. [Google Scholar] Vaughan,47 Youtube [Internet]. Vaughan, K. Childbirth as an athletic feat (1939). 2009 Feb 23 [cited 2015 Aug 30]. Available from: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=g9wRBWDxReY. [Google Scholar] and Morris33 Morris M. Basic physical training. London: Heinemann; 1937. [Google Scholar] that were dominated by standing exercises. He explained: ‘Note that all the exercises are performed while you are in a sitting or reclining position. This is done to relieve your heart from undue strain as well as to take advantage of the more normal (original) visceral organs.’46 Pilates J, Miller WJ. Return to life through Contrology. Nevada: Presentation Dynamics; 1945. [Google Scholar]


This section outlines the shared characteristics of the six aforementioned MMB pioneers. They all elaborated in length on their philosophy and exercises from a personal perspective, leading to a similar notion that the innate ability to stand and move harmoniously as a normal manner provides multiple advantages. These include physical and mental health, reduced movement-based symptoms, prevention and optimal injury and sickness recovery, enhanced physical performance, retention of the natural human form, and the ability to control the harmonious body rather than acquired movement impairments.
Studies show that with fibromyalgia, the initial rise in oxidative stress will begin to decrease as you continue your workout; however, with CFS, prolonged exercise can increase the oxidative stress and the associated pain. This is where you might feel malaise after exercise as well. You can see why it is necessary to start slow and work up with consistency. Having severe M.E. myself, I know it can be done and it does take persistence. 

Endurance performance (i.e. exercise duration > 1 min) is extensively studied in exercise physiology using cycling and/or running exercise (e.g. [1–4]). Despite being close to real competition events by involving the whole-body, the use of cycling and/or running exercise presents some important limitations to understand the role of the central nervous system (CNS) in the regulation of muscle fatigue and endurance performance. Indeed, as whole-body exercise involves greater systemic responses than isolated exercise [5], it is difficult to interpret some specific experimental manipulations aiming to understand CNS processes regulating muscle fatigue and endurance performance (e.g. manipulation of III-IV muscle afferents [6, 7]). Furthermore, due to the need to transfer the participant from the treadmill/bicycle to the ergometer, the true extent of muscle fatigue at exhaustion is underestimated [8], leading to inconclusive results on how peripheral (i.e. fatigue produced by changes at or distal to the neuromuscular junction [9]) and central (i.e. decrease in maximal voluntary activation level [9]) components of muscle fatigue might interact between each other’s (for review see [2, 9]). Therefore, due to the aforementioned limitations, the development of a new exercise model is required to better investigate the CNS processes regulating endurance performance.
Go online for more information, recommends certified personal trainer Paula Zurowski. Web sites like collagevideo.com or Zurowski's exercisevideosreviews.com offer detailed descriptions and ratings of fitness videos. Collage even offers a one-minute clip of most videos, so you can get a feel for the level of the workout and whether you're going to like the instructor.
Yoga is appropriate for individuals of all ages and fitness levels. Those who are seeking a workout that increases their mind, body and spiritual awareness will find yoga to be a good fit for them. Those who wish to increase their fitness level at a slower pace may find that yoga is perfect for them, although the physical intensity is just as high as in many other exercise methods. Yoga exercises utilize a variety of muscle groups at the same time, so an entire body workout is often achieved during each class. Yoga is effective in toning muscles without creating a bulky look.
Vinylcise has been historically neglected, and probably for good reason: it's terrible, and not very effective—at least not since we've had visual media alternatives. Can you imagine trying to follow along to an audio-only workout? At any rate, these workout records first appeared in the early 1920s, and were usually accompanied by a paper foldout with exercise diagrams (see the image). The earliest of these records appear to be the set of five Wallace Reducing Records released in 1920-1922 by the Wallace Institute of Chicago and pressed by Columbia Records. These records were marketed towards women, aiming to help them "get thin to music." Other exercise records of the 1920s included Victor Records for Health Exercises, released in 1922, the Battle Creek Sanitarium Health Ladder, directed by John Harvey Kellogg and released by Columbia Records in 1923, and Walter Camp's Daily Dozen, released in 1924.

I've been strength training for over 15 years now. In college, between martial arts and four months of lifting weights for 6 hours per week I gave myself overuse injuries in my shoulders and knee. I've tried everything, including Mike Mentzer's books, Arnold Schwarzennegger's Bodybuilding Bible, Stuart McRobert's Beyond Brawn, Sisco and Little's Power Factor Training, routines from Men's Health, Flex, and Muscle & Fitness magazines - you name it. Super Slow (and its cousins Slow Burn and Power of 10) are the ONLY form of exercise I can handle for more than two months without having those pains flare up with a vengeance and force me to quit. I've done Super Slow for years without the slightest ache except for normal muscle soreness.
Training to Failure. During most lifts with a moderately heavy weight, the set is completed before failure is reached. Muscles feels taxed, the sweating has begun, a few more sets are rocked, and we move on to the next exercise. This is a great way to get stronger, but is taking a set to failure an even better way? Yes and no Muscle Activation strategies during strength training with heavy loading vs. repetitions to failure. Sundstrup, E., et al. 1 National Research Center for the Working Environment, Copenhagen, Denmark 2, Institute of Sport Science and Clinical Biomechanics, University of Southern Denmark, Odense, Denmark 3Department of Occupational and Environmental Medicine, Bispebjerg University Hospital, Copenhagen, Denmark. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research. 2012 Jul;26(7):1897-903.. While training to failure — lifting until the body can't do a single more rep — recruits more muscle and triggers the body to release more strength-building hormones, it’s most effective if a very high percentage of a one rep max can be performed The application of training to failure in periodized multiple-set resistance exercise programs. Willardson, J.M. Physical Education Department, Eastern Illinois University, Charleston, Illinois 61920, USA. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research; 2007 May;21(2):628-31. The mechanisms of muscle hypertrophy and their application to resistance training. Schoenfeld BJ. Global Fitness Services, Scarsdale, New York, USA. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research; 2010 Oct;24(10):2857-72.. Also, sets to failure increase the opportunity for overtraining and injury, so it’s best to use this technique only occasionally and with a spotter.
At the end of each pregnancy journey, you’re greeted by the mother of all marathons and we want to help you prepare for your birth experience in the best possible ways. Our Bloom classes as well as our 1:1 foundational crash courses were designed with empowerment in mind. We can’t promise you’ll find gentle workouts behind our studio door [you’ve got a marathon to train for] but we can promise that each workout will give you the safest, most effective, mind + body focused workout you’ll find in the prenatal world. Our workouts will make you sweat, challenging you both mentally and physically, while we integrate our signature techniques seamlessly into each exercise you move through. Think of it as childbirth education meets a safe sweat session gifting you tools to be used time and time again.

Eight healthy and moderately active (a minimum of 2 h of aerobic activity per week) adults (mean ± SD; age: 22 ± 2 yrs, height: 171 ± 8 cm, weight: 69 ± 8 kg, 5 males and 3 females) volunteered to participate in this study. None of the subjects had any known mental or somatic disorder. Each subject gave written informed consent prior to the study. Experimental protocol and procedures were approved by the local Ethics Committee of the School of Sport and Exercise Sciences, University of Kent at Medway (Ethic clearance Prop97_2013_14). The study conformed to the standards set by the World Medical Association Declaration of Helsinki “Ethical Principles for Medical Research Involving Human Subjects” (2008). All subjects were given written instructions describing all procedures related to the study.
Dewayne Riggins, celebrity trainer and Founder and CEO of Inspirational Fitness, says you can work your quads and glutes with reverse lunges—30 seconds on each leg. How to do them: Stand in an upright position and then step back with one leg; bend knees as low as you can. Drop your back knee to one inch off the ground or as low as you can and be sure front knee is not leaning over the foot. Repeat with the other leg.

The physical benefits of Pilates include an increase in muscle strength and tone without creating bulk. The increase in deep core muscle strength helps to make your abdominal muscles look tight and toned. It also improves your flexibility and posture, which can decrease your chances of injuring yourself. Pilates is also effective in easing chronic lower back pain and preventing future back pain and injuries.
Hold off on buying that gym membership! These workout DVDs are a great alternative for busy women who still want to get toned. Just pop one of these DVDs into your computer or television when you get home and see how much easier it is to integrate working out into your everyday schedule. From yoga to strength training, there's a workout for everyone.
The MMB exercises are not pathology orientated or sport specific, rather all exercises are recommended for everybody, whether they are injured, healthy, or a competitive athlete; the ability to perform the exercises represents the normal. The exercises and sequence do not change, besides the difficulty levels which are adjusted according to the individual level of practice. The MMB progressions occur when the exercises become easier and eventually autonomous and harmonious, ensuring the short- and long-term benefits of practice. Harmonious breathing and relaxation techniques are employed in every exercise repetition. Furthermore, there is the recommendation to train daily in relaxed environments, with abundant fresh air and appropriate sunlight levels and to bath regularly. Studio training is recommended for beginners, people with ailments or performing athletes.
What Does the Workout Focus on? – This goes along with matching the exercise video to what you want to work on in your fitness goals. Make sure the exercise video you choose will help you reach the fitness goals you have. For example, if one of your goals is to work on getting flatter abs and there is not an abs exercise on the whole video, this is a major fitness goal that goes untouched. With the variety of exercise videos on the market today, you will be able to find an exercise video that helps you reach your goals.
^ Jump up to: a b c d Basso JC, Suzuki WA (March 2017). "The Effects of Acute Exercise on Mood, Cognition, Neurophysiology, and Neurochemical Pathways: A Review". Brain Plasticity. 2 (2): 127–152. doi:10.3233/BPL-160040. Lay summary – Can A Single Exercise Session Benefit Your Brain? (12 June 2017). A large collection of research in humans has shown that a single bout of exercise alters behavior at the level of affective state and cognitive functioning in several key ways. In terms of affective state, acute exercise decreases negative affect, increases positive affect, and decreases the psychological and physiological response to acute stress [28]. These effects have been reported to persist for up to 24 hours after exercise cessation [28, 29, 53]. In terms of cognitive functioning, acute exercise primarily enhances executive functions dependent on the prefrontal cortex including attention, working memory, problem solving, cognitive flexibility, verbal fluency, decision making, and inhibitory control [9]. These positive changes have been demonstrated to occur with very low to very high exercise intensities [9], with effects lasting for up to two hours after the end of the exercise bout (Fig. 1A) [27]. Moreover, many of these neuropsychological assessments measure several aspects of behavior including both accuracy of performance and speed of processing. McMorris and Hale performed a meta-analysis examining the effects of acute exercise on both accuracy and speed of processing, revealing that speed significantly improved post-exercise, with minimal or no effect on accuracy [17]. These authors concluded that increasing task difficulty or complexity may help to augment the effect of acute exercise on accuracy. ... However, in a comprehensive meta-analysis, Chang and colleagues found that exercise intensities ranging from very light (<50% MHR) to very hard (>93% MHR) have all been reported to improve cognitive functioning [9].
Want to target the upper back without a reformer? Lie face down on a mat with your feet together. Raise your head and chest slightly, and extend your arms perpendicular to your body, palms down. Exhale and sweep the arms back as you lift your chin and chest higher. Keep your waist on the mat and use your upper back muscles to bring your arms closer to your body. Return to starting position. Do five reps.
The other important part? It has to be tough — 85% or more exertion for 30-seconds to one minute, followed by a 10-second rest. Or, as Heather Tyler, an NSCA-certified personal trainer and owner of Simply Fit LA wrote to me in an email, “you know that feeling like you’ve run up five flights of stairs, your heart’s pounding in your ears, you’re dripping sweat and you sound like a donkey wheezing?”
The Pull-up is performed by hanging from a chin-up bar above head height with the palms facing forward (supinated) and pulling the body up so the chin reaches or passes the bar. The pull-up is a compound exercise that also involves the biceps, forearms, traps, and the rear deltoids. A chin-up (palms facing backwards) places more emphasis on the biceps and a wide grip pullup places more emphasis on the lats. As beginners of this exercise are often unable to lift their own bodyweight, a chin-up machine can be used with counterweights to assist them in the lift.
Selection bias may limit generalizability to other populations of older adults since the included participants in the Generation 100 study were healthier, more educated and more physically active than nonparticipants [19]. However, our study population was diverse and included both healthy as well as older adults with comorbidities, and both inactive and very active older adults were included. The findings in the present study are based on a very large data material, and represent the most comprehensive data material on exercise patterns among older adults to date.
Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.1 article “Mechanisms and Mediators of the Skeletal Muscle Repeated Bout Effect” from author Rob Hyldahl. Skeletal muscle adapts to exercise-induced damage by orchestrating several but still poorly understood mechanisms that endow protection from subsequent damage. Known widely as the repeated bout effect, we propose that neural adaptations, alterations to muscle mechanical properties, structural remodeling of the extracellular matrix, and biochemical signaling work in concert to coordinate the protective adaptation.

Various weighted dumbbells. Some exercises require heavier weights, while others will need lighter weights or none at all. Try to have a range of dumbbells: a light set (3 to 5 pounds for women, 5 to 8 pounds for men), a medium set (5 to 10 pounds for women, 10 to 15 pounds for men), and a heavy set (10 to 20 pounds for women, 15 to 30 pounds for men).

The baseline characteristics of the study participants are presented in Table 1. No differences between the training groups existed at study entry. In both groups, men spent more hours in sedentary behavior and had significantly higher weight, height, and VO2peak compared to women. Contrary, more women than men performed at least 30 min of daily physical activity (Table 1). The included participants had higher VO2peak (11%) compared to those with no exercise logs. They also had higher VO2peak (17%) and height (1.7%) compared to dropouts, but a lower BMI (3.7%) (p < 0.05). A higher proportion of the included participants performed 30 min of daily physical activity compared to the dropouts (77.3% vs. 66.1%, p < 0.05).
I purchased Insanity a few years back and only lasted for 3-4 workouts. The workouts were too difficult for me and although I enjoyed it, I just failed to commit to it. Fast forward to July of this year..... I am not even sure why I attempted it again, but I am glad I did. First things first; this program is physically challenging to the point that I would recommend anyone going into it be cleared by their doctor BEFORE starting. Seeing a physician after you've injured yourself is the equivalent of closing the barn after the horses got out! There, it's been said. Now on to my review of this product.

This is the first review to have focused on exercise as an add-on strategy in the treatment of MDD. Our findings corroborate some previous observations that were based on few studies and which were difficult to generalize.41,51,73,92,93 Given the results of the present article, it seems that exercise might be an effective strategy to enhance the antidepressant effect of medication treatments. Moreover, we hypothesize that the main role of exercise on treatment-resistant depression is in inducing neurogenesis by increasing BDNF expression, as was demonstrated by several recent studies.


To strengthen and tone your abs, Marks says to go with V-Ups. Here’s his instruction: Begin lying on your back with your legs straight and arms extended overhead. Engage your core by pressing your lower back into the ground. Keeping your legs and arms straight, simultaneously lift your legs and torso up, reaching your hands toward your feet. Your body will form a “V.” Slowly lower to the starting position. And if you want an added challenge? Dempsey says “don’t let your arms and legs rest on the ground in between reps.” Ouch! If you’re working this hard (even for just 30 seconds!) don’t undo your efforts by making any of these 30 Flat-Belly Mistakes Women Make.

Video Abstract for the ESSR 45.4 article “Mechanisms Associated With Physical ActivityBehavior: Insights From Rodent Experiments” from authors Michael D. Roberts, Gregory N. Ruegsegger, Jacob D. Brown, and Frank W. Booth. Dopaminergic signaling differences in the nucleus accumbens (NAcc) seemingly predispose rats to adopt different physical activity behaviors. Physical activity behavior also may be regulated through peripheral mechanisms (i.e., muscle and fat derived as well as hormonal signals). We hypothesize that physical activity behavior is regulated by the convergence of central and peripheral mechanisms onto the NAcc.


Physical exercise is important for maintaining physical fitness and can contribute to maintaining a healthy weight, regulating digestive health, building and maintaining healthy bone density, muscle strength, and joint mobility, promoting physiological well-being, reducing surgical risks, and strengthening the immune system. Some studies indicate that exercise may increase life expectancy and the overall quality of life.[10] People who participate in moderate to high levels of physical exercise have a lower mortality rate compared to individuals who by comparison are not physically active.[11] Moderate levels of exercise have been correlated with preventing aging by reducing inflammatory potential.[12] The majority of the benefits from exercise are achieved with around 3500 metabolic equivalent (MET) minutes per week.[13] For example, climbing stairs 10 minutes, vacuuming 15 minutes, gardening 20 minutes, running 20 minutes, and walking or bicycling for transportation 25 minutes on a daily basis would together achieve about 3000 MET minutes a week.[13] A lack of physical activity causes approximately 6% of the burden of disease from coronary heart disease, 7% of type 2 diabetes, 10% of breast cancer and 10% of colon cancer worldwide.[14] Overall, physical inactivity causes 9% of premature mortality worldwide.[14]

^ Jump up to: a b c Cox EP, O'Dwyer N, Cook R, Vetter M, Cheng HL, Rooney K, O'Connor H (August 2016). "Relationship between physical activity and cognitive function in apparently healthy young to middle-aged adults: A systematic review". J. Sci. Med. Sport. 19 (8): 616–628. doi:10.1016/j.jsams.2015.09.003. PMID 26552574. A range of validated platforms assessed CF across three domains: executive function (12 studies), memory (four studies) and processing speed (seven studies). ... In studies of executive function, five found a significant ES in favour of higher PA, ranging from small to large. Although three of four studies in the memory domain reported a significant benefit of higher PA, there was only one significant ES, which favoured low PA. Only one study examining processing speed had a significant ES, favouring higher PA.

Add tai chi to your exercise routine. Tai chi is a Chinese martial art that involves sequences of slow movements. It can help improve your balance, flexibility, and concentration, and it’s a good way to manage stress. Since it’s a low impact form of exercise, it’s a good option if you’re elderly, have a history of medical issues, or have recently suffered an injury.[28]
Did you know that there are actually four types of exercise, all of which serve varied purposes? Everyone knows that routine exercise is very important for healthy adults for varied functions, including bone and muscle strength, weight-loss or weight maintenance, heart health and even cognitive health. But there are four different types of exercise: Aerobic (or endurance), strength, flexibility and balance.
Data were analysed using three different methods: visual inspection, parametric statistics and calculation of sensitivity for both OTS and NFO detection. Because the sample size was rather small (ie, maximal 5 for each group), data were first inspected visually. Parametric statistics and sensitivity calculation were used to support conclusions from visual inspection of the data. For the purpose of visual inspection, we created graphs with averages and SE for both the OTS and the NFO groups.

Also important to know is how to determine how much weight you should use. Start with a light weight and perform a set. Continue adding weight until you can do the desired number of reps with good form, which includes moving slowly enough that you're using muscle—and not momentum—to lift the weight. The last rep should be difficult, but not impossible, and you should be able to keep good form while doing it.


Major findings: Within a few decades of the turn of the 20th century, a cluster of mind–body exercise methods emerged from at least six pioneering founders: Checkley, Müller, Alexander, Randell, Pilates, and Morris. Each was based upon a similar exercise philosophy and similar functional movement-harmonizing exercises. This renaissance of independent mind–body schools occurred in parallel with the demise of the 18th and 19th century gymnasium Physical Culture movement and the concurrent emergence of bodybuilding and strength training. Even though mostly forgotten today, Western mind–body exercise methods enjoyed celebrated success during the first half of the 20th century, were hailed by medical and allied health practitioners and practiced by millions from society’s elite to deprived minorities.
What Does the Workout Focus on? – This goes along with matching the exercise video to what you want to work on in your fitness goals. Make sure the exercise video you choose will help you reach the fitness goals you have. For example, if one of your goals is to work on getting flatter abs and there is not an abs exercise on the whole video, this is a major fitness goal that goes untouched. With the variety of exercise videos on the market today, you will be able to find an exercise video that helps you reach your goals.
Do you have any health or physical limitations to consider? If you have back problems, knee issues, arthritis, high blood pressure, asthma, or any kind of health or physical limitations, you need to consider these when looking at the array of exercise videos on the market. There are some that will push you to the very edges of your limits and others that can accommodate a necessity for lower impact and a slower pace yet are still effective. Ignoring health problems or physical limitations is very dangerous. Asking your doctor for any restrictions before shopping is a plus as well.
Mice having access to activity wheels engaged in voluntary exercise and increased their propensity to run as adults.[150] Artificial selection of mice exhibited significant heritability in voluntary exercise levels,[151] with "high-runner" breeds having enhanced aerobic capacity,[152] hippocampal neurogenesis,[153] and skeletal muscle morphology.[154]
VO2peak improved in overweight and obese males (pre and post values in L/min, respectively; W = 3.2 ± 0.6 vs. 3.7 ± 0.5, p < 0.001; O = 3.6 ± 0.6 vs. 3.8 ± 0.6, p = 0.013) as well as in overweight females (2.0 ± 0.3 vs. 2.3 ± 0.4, p < 0.001). VO2peak in the first ventilatory threshold (VT1) increased for all 4 interventions in males (p < 0.05), except for S in the obese group (1.6 ± 0.2 vs. 1.7 ± 0.3, p = 0.141). In females, it increased in E (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.4 ± 0.3, p < 0.001), SE (0.9 ± 0.2 vs. 1.2 ± 0.4, p = 0.003), and PA (0.9 ± 0.1 vs. 1.2 ± 0.2, p = 0.006) in overweight groups. Time-to-exhaustion improved in all subjects except for females in PA group (15.7 ± 0.3 min vs. 15.9 ± 0.3 min, p = 0.495).
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