Many exercise protocols are in use in clinical cardiology, but no single test is applicable to the wide range of patients' exercise capacity. A new protocol was devised that starts at a low workload and increases by 15% of the previous workload every minute. This is the first protocol to be based on exponential rather than linear increments in workload. The new protocol (standardised exponential exercise protocol, STEEP) is suitable for use on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer. This protocol was compared with standard protocols in 30 healthy male volunteers, each of whom performed four exercise tests: the STEEP treadmill and bicycle protocols, a modified Bruce treadmill protocol, and a 20 W/min bicycle protocol. During the two STEEP tests the subjects' oxygen consumption rose gradually and exponentially and there was close agreement between the bicycle and the treadmill protocols. A higher proportion of subjects completed the treadmill than the bicycle protocol. Submaximal heart rates were slightly higher during the bicycle test. The STEEP protocol took less time than the modified Bruce treadmill protocol, which tended to produce plateaux in oxygen consumption during the early stages. The 20 W/min bicycle protocol does not take account of subjects' body weight and consequently produced large intersubject variability in oxygen consumption. The STEEP protocol can be used on either a treadmill or a bicycle ergometer and it should be suitable for a wide range of patients.

Circuit Training. Some gyms are set up to move people from machine to machine or exercise to exercise with little rest. This keeps the heart pumping and the muscles working. Work at each station for 30 to 45 seconds, or a certain number of reps, and keep the rest periods short, just the time it takes to walk from station to station. Like with supersets, this method combines the benefits of strength training and a bit of cardio at the same time Similarity in adaptations to high-resistance circuit vs. traditional strength training in resistance-trained men. Alcaraz, P.E., Perez-Gomez, J., Chavarrias, M., et al. Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, San Antonio Catholic University of Murcia, Murcia, Spain. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research; 2011 Sep;25(9):2519-27. Physical performance and cardiovascular responses to an acute bout of heavy resistance circuit training versus traditional strength training. Alcaraz, P.E., Sanchez-Lorente, J., Blazevich, A.J. Kinesiology and Biomechanics Laboratory, Department of Physical Activity and Sport Sciences, Universidad Católica San Antonio de Murcia, Guadalupe, Murcia, Spain. Journal of Strength and Conditioning Research; 2008 May;22(3):667-71.. It's easy to do a simple circuit at home, too: Lunges from wall to wall, sit ups in front of the TV, incline push ups on the coffee table, lateral hops over the sleeping puppy — work hard, move quick, get fit!
Fortunately, recent scientific studies have shown that Ubiquinol CoQ10 and PQQ supplementation will protect the mitochondria and reduce high levels of oxidative stress. With less mitochondrial fatigue, tolerable exercise can be had by the CFS/ME person.  Please also check the supplement page as I also use PQQ for oxidative stress along with Ubiquinol. 
Founder Ken Hutchins' SuperSlow has been 'managed' by unscrupulous business partners, into a commercial entity bearing little resemblance to his original intention, (& no involvement with Mr Hutchins himself, nor any of his original associates). The -real- SS was revolutionary for its time, but Hutchins' new textbook, "The Renaissance of Exercise, a Vitruvian Adventure", is the result of his ongoing refinements over the past 18 years. Rather than pay over a $150 for the supposed historic value of a slim, soft-cover, dog-eared $10 book & it's relatively primitive ideas, get the new hard-cover textbook./It seems that one of the main criticisms os The Manual is "too much information". True, for a casual reader.The fact is, ANY exercise protocol is simple enough to write up on one or two pages: How many sets. How many reps. How many exercises. How often. About 10 exercise technique descriptions: Done. It's the precise whys, hows, & special cases that take a book to fulfill.
Fit septuagenarians may even need to be held back: “Strength training is super empowering,” she says. “And people get excited when they see and feel the results. I have older clients doing multiple timed sets of kettlebell swings. One older client biked 2,700 miles in 50 days. It takes a little longer, but they can reach really impressive levels of fitness.”

^ Jump up to: a b c d Ranjbar E, Memari AH, Hafizi S, Shayestehfar M, Mirfazeli FS, Eshghi MA (June 2015). "Depression and Exercise: A Clinical Review and Management Guideline". Asian J. Sports Med. 6 (2): e24055. doi:10.5812/asjsm.6(2)2015.24055. PMC 4592762. PMID 26448838. Keeping in mind that exercise shows no medication side effects such as withdrawal symptoms (20), weight gain, dry mouth or insomnia (21), but shows potential health benefits such as weight reduction, it is highly recommended to use exercise as an adjunctive treatment for depression (22). New findings confirm that exercise can be recommended as a first-line treatment for mild to moderate depression; as an adjunct to medications (23); as an alternative to cognitive behavioral therapy (11); and in preventing depression in clinical as well as healthy populations (24–26). ... Although recent findings have shown that exercise can decrease depressive symptoms, there are still many questions and limitations to wider application of exercise in depression. For instance, there are deficiencies in methodological planning such as uncontrolled nonrandomized trials, small sample sizes, inadequate allocation concealment, lack of intention-to-treat analyses, non-blinded outcome assessments, and inclusion of subjects without clinical diagnosis that limit the interpretability of research outcomes (53).
Exercise is any bodily activity that enhances or maintains physical fitness and overall health and wellness.[1] It is performed for various reasons, including increasing growth and development, preventing aging, strengthening muscles and the cardiovascular system, honing athletic skills, weight loss or maintenance, and also for enjoyment. Many individuals choose to exercise outdoors where they can congregate in groups, socialize, and enhance well-being.[2]
To shake up your strength workout, replace the everyone-does-'em moves (crunches, etc.) with this fresh routine created by Dixon. Do this series two to three times per week, alternating with cardio days; you'll start to see results in as little as two to three weeks. Each move hits the same major muscle groups as the old standbys, but challenges them more, giving you a stronger, sleeker body in the same amount of time. So it's efficient—in the best way possible.
The VE group consisted of 8 women and 12 men (age 69.6 ± 3.9 years; weight 70.7 ± 12.1 kg; height 161.3 ± 6.9 cm). The control group consisted of 6 women and 14 men (age 71.2 ± 3.7 years; weight 76.1 ± 12.3 kg; height 167.5 ± 9.8 cm). Only 20 subjects of the VE group and 8 of the control group correctly completed the trials (see Figure 1 and Limitation of the Study paragraph). Adherence to protocol of the VE group was checked daily by our motor scientist by means of a daily record where he noted the week and participation number, the mean HR of the sessions, the type of exercises, and the number of repetitions per set carried out. During the training period, no adverse events such as dizziness, musculoskeletal pain, or cardiovascular issues were recorded. After 12 weeks, there were significant improvements in strength, flexibility, balance, and agility tested by SFT. T0-T1 differences are shown in Figures ​Figures22 and ​and3.3. Namely, 5 tests out of 6 showed significant improvement: Chair Stand (T0 12.4 ± 2.4; T1 13.5 ± 2.6, p < 0.01), Arm Curl (T0 14.2 ± 3.6; T1 16.6 ± 3.6, p < 0.01), 2 min step (T0 98.2 ± 15.7; T1 108.9 ± 16.2, p < 0.01), Chair Sit-and-Reach (T0 −9.9 ± 7.7 cm; T1 1.7 ± 6.3 cm, p < 0.01), and Back Scratch (T0 −15.8 ± 10.9 cm; T1 −8.4 ± 13.1 cm, p < 0.01). Conversely, the 8-foot up and go test (T0 6.5 ± 7.6 sec; T1 4.5 ± 0.6 sec, p > 0.05) showed no significant statistical difference due to a high SD in T0 assessment.
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